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cowdery
08-26-2005, 11:50
As some of you may know, George Washington, after his presidency, operated a commercial-scale distillery on his Mount Vernon estate. His estate manager was a Scot who suggested the distillery, as the farm already had a gristmill and grew all the necessary grains. The distillery operated from 1797 to 1800 and was one of the largest of its day, with five stills.

I spoke recently with Dennis Pogue, the Associate Director, Preservation, at Mount Vernon. He mentioned that Washington documented all of his farm activities thoroughly. An interesting fact he told me is that Washington sold three grades of whiskey. His "common" whiskey was double-distilled and sold for 60 cents a gallon. His higher grades were either triple- or quadruple-distilled and sold for up to $1.00 a gallon. He also flavored some of his whiskey with cinnamon.

kbuzbee
08-26-2005, 12:48
As some of you may know, George Washington, after his presidency, operated a commercial-scale distillery on his Mount Vernon estate. His estate manager was a Scot who suggested the distillery, as the farm already had a gristmill and grew all the necessary grains. The distillery operated from 1797 to 1800 and was one of the largest of its day, with five stills.

I spoke recently with Dennis Pogue, the Associate Director, Preservation, at Mount Vernon. He mentioned that Washington documented all of his farm activities thoroughly. An interesting fact he told me is that Washington sold three grades of whiskey. His "common" whiskey was double-distilled and sold for 60 cents a gallon. His higher grades were either triple- or quadruple-distilled and sold for up to $1.00 a gallon. He also flavored some of his whiskey with cinnamon.



Quadruple distilled?? Wow. Chuck were all these sold raw or were any aged?? Also, have you hear anything on the project to restore the distillery to production status???

Cheers,

Ken

chasking
08-26-2005, 14:54
I spoke recently with Dennis Pogue, the Associate Director, Preservation, at Mount Vernon.



Is he related to the Old Pogue Pogues? There sure were a whole bunch of them at Whiskeyfest.

cowdery
08-26-2005, 18:29
The reconstruction is well underway. See photo below. They expect it to be operational by 2007, I believe. The gristmill, which is operational, is in the background.

Whiskey in that era was not deliberately aged. Even with four distillations it is doubtful they got close to neutral spirits, but undoubtedly they got a cleaner distillate with each pass. Then they would flavor it with fruit, herbs or spices, hence the variety of Colonial flips, juleps, punches, etc.

Dennis may be related to the whiskey Pogues, whom he has met, but he doesn't know for sure.

bobbyc
08-26-2005, 21:29
Now that's rich, a little shade to lay those stones in! I bet the original builders never had it so cushy. Hell I didn't have any on my work. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/banghead.gif

smilindave
09-18-2005, 06:44
I picked thios up off the web a couple years ago. Thought it might be of interest to this conversation thread. Smilindav

Washington's Whiskey Recipe
Tue Oct 21, 2003 5:34 PM ET Add U.S. National - AP

By The Associated Press

The recipe, or "mash bill," calls for: 65 percent rye, 30 percent corn and 5 percent malted barley.
First, grind the grains into a coarse meal. Then, mix the rye and corn in a wood vessel called a "hog's head." Add hot and cold water, and stick your hand in the mash to make sure it isn't too hot. If it doesn't burn, the temperature is just right. Add barley and stir.
Cool the mixture down a bit more, and add yeast. Let the mixture ferment for a few days.
Pour the mixture into a copper still, and let it boil. The alcohol will vaporize and condense, flowing out of a tube, also known as a worm.
Collect the liquid and run it through the copper still one more time. After that, you'll have finished whiskey.
Washington barreled his whiskey and sold it immediately. These days, distillers age it for a few years to improve its taste.

cowdery
10-03-2005, 16:12
Taken at Mt. Vernon on September 28, 2005.

gr8erdane
10-03-2005, 20:13
Good to see George aging so gracefully.... http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/smilielol.gif

barturtle
10-03-2005, 21:15
Yes, but he really needs some new threads http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/lol.gif

cas
10-05-2005, 09:59
Not bad for someone pushing 274! I need some of that whiskey.
Craig

cowdery
11-03-2005, 13:17
The South Wall is complete. The hole in the upper-right-hand corner is where water will enter to cool the worm tubs. This is from the Mount Vernon Web Site (http://www.mountvernon.org/learn/pres_arch/index.cfm/pid/745/).

wku88
11-28-2005, 19:23
Didn't Bill Samuels, Booker (and mebbe Fred) Noe cook up a batch at Mt. Vernon a couple years ago???

barturtle
11-28-2005, 19:35
Yes, check out the link

http://www.straightbourbon.com/ubbthread...=true#Post47064 (http://www.straightbourbon.comhttp://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showflat.php?Cat=0&Board=other&Number=47064&Searchpage=1&Main=47064&Words=washington&topic=&Search=true#Post47064)

cowdery
11-29-2005, 23:55
On September 28, 2005, I attended the dedication of George Washington's reconstructed distillery at Mount Vernon in Virginia, which included rum making in an 18th center replica still, and the bottling of a unique whiskey blended at Mount Vernon. Click here to watch the slide show. (http://cowdery.home.netcom.com/mtvernon/mtvernon.htm)