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Ghoste
11-18-2005, 21:17
Just wondering how much interest some of you fine folks have in the Emerald Isle offerings?
I like to keep a few around for a change every now and again. Currently, my favourite non bourbon pour is Bushmills black label.

CrispyCritter
11-18-2005, 22:15
Black Bush is a very good choice indeed. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/drink.gif It's almost too easy-drinking. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/falling.gif

The others I've had, and have also liked quite well have been Redbreast 12yo, and Connemara (in both the standard and cask-strength offerings).

Redbreast is the only example I know of the traditional Irish pot-still whiskey (mash of malted barley and unmalted grains, distilled entirely in pot stills) that is (a) currently in production and (b) affordable. It's one of Irish Distillers' products.

Connemara, from Cooley, is a pot-stilled single malt (100% malted barley), and the malt is peated. If you like peated Scotches, give it a try.

Another interesting tidbit: Bushmills has been spun off from the Irish Distillers Group - it's part of Diageo now, with Pernod Ricard holding on to IDG and the Midleton distillery. Cooley is still the only true independent in Ireland, though - that after a long period where IDG had a complete monopoly on Irish whiskey production.

Hedmans Brorsa
11-19-2005, 04:47
Redbreast is the only example I know of the traditional Irish pot-still whiskey



There is also Green Spot. Basically, this is a younger version of Redbreast (no age statement, though.) with less sherry input which gives the whiskey opportunity to display some herbal/vegetable characteristics.

At some stage, the brand was made exclusively for a liquor store in Dublin but in recent years it has cropped up in a lot of places, including Swedish state controlled liquor shops, indicating perhaps a change.

There was also, produced in conjunction with the Millenium celebrations, a Jameson 15yo. Becoming extremely scarce (not to mention expensive) it reminded me a lot of Redbreast, only difference being more traces of refined oak.

Ghoste
11-19-2005, 06:17
I have some of the Redbreast around here too. That's been my second choice of late. I had some Tullamore Dew a while back that I liked quite well too but haven't been able to find it again.
I'm going to have to try the older Jameson's if I can find some. We have some regular Jameson's here and my wife prefers that.

kbuzbee
11-19-2005, 14:57
Yeah, same here. We had an Irish tasting last St Patrick's day. Jameson, Red Breast, Bushmill's 16yo...

The concensous was for the Bushmill's 16 yo. Very tasty when you want to go that way (which I haven't in some time)

Ken

gr8erdane
11-20-2005, 00:59
My experience has been mostly in the Bushmills. I have std Bush, Bushmill's Millenium Malt and Redbreast behind my bar but have had the Black Bush and 10 yr Single Malt Bush and have enjoyed them all. I have been rather stingy on the MM which is very good but I really do like the Redbreast from time to time as a change from bourbon.

Ghoste
11-20-2005, 08:00
I like that idea of an Irish whiskey tasting in March. I may have to collect a couple more samples over the winter and do that.

AVB
11-20-2005, 18:17
Not a big fan of Irish but I do like Bushmill's Millennium Malt. It's getting pretty expensive now though. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif

brockagh
11-21-2005, 01:00
Pure pot still Irish, for me, is the greatest of all whisk(e)y. They have made it a little lighter over the last 20 years, though, and I don't think it's as good as it once was.

Remaining whiskey from old, not closed distilleries like the Jameson Bow Street, Powers John's Lane, Tullamore and Midleton show just how good this kind of whiskey can be. All of these labels are still being produced, but from the new Midleton Distillery.

Anyway, in my opinion, some great Irish whiskeys are:

Redbreast
Green Spot
Jameson 12
Powers 12
Powers Gold Label
Jameson 18
Jameson Gold
Bushmills Millennium
Bushmills Select Casks - Carribean Rum

Edward_call_me_Ed
11-21-2005, 03:47
Hi Hedmans,


There is also Green Spot. Basically, this is a younger version of Redbreast (no age statement, though.) with less sherry input which gives the whiskey opportunity to display some herbal/vegetable characteristics.




I have wanted to try the Red Breast for a while now. It is a little bit expensive, I don't remember the price for a bottle when I have seen it but it was somewhere in the range of two good bottles of bourbon and the bourbon has always won out. So Far. I have seen it in one bar, but they wanted 12 bucks for a shot and I think that place gives stingy shots. Not that they short you, but 30, 31 ml isn't much whiskey when you are paying 12 bucks. I may ask my favorite bar to stock some. They will probably do it and they will give me more than my money's worth.

I didn't know that Green Spot was young Red Breast. I occasionally see it. Next time I will check the price and maybe buy a bottle.

Ed

barturtle
11-21-2005, 06:33
That seems kind of excessive for Redbreast, I believe I paid abound $40 for my last bottle in KY. It's quite nice, with a very lively palate, but I don't think $12 a shot is quite worth it.

Edward_call_me_Ed
11-21-2005, 07:32
Hi Barturtle,
The price you paid for a bottle is close to what I saw at the liquior store here. They always say, "Try it in a bar before you shell out for a bottle." That rarely works for me. In Japan when I see something like Red Breast in a bar I think, "Hmm. Two or Three shots and I could buy the bottle. I had better buy the bottle." That is not true of every bar here but is true of most of them that stock things you can't find in the supermarket.
Ed

Hedmans Brorsa
11-21-2005, 10:22
I have wanted to try the Red Breast for a while now. It is a little bit expensive, I don't remember the price for a bottle when I have seen it but it was somewhere in the range of two good bottles of bourbon



In Sweden Redbreast goes for approximately the same price as EC 12, i.e. a good price.

Be sure to try Green Spot if you can find it. If forced to choose I would opt for Redbreast but GS offers an interesting variation on the theme.

Ghoste
11-21-2005, 19:08
You guys in the US are lucky. I pay the same for my bourbon as I do for Red Breast.

Edward_call_me_Ed
11-21-2005, 19:29
Where are you Ghoste?
Ed

Ghoste
11-22-2005, 02:57
Ontario, Canada.

Edward_call_me_Ed
11-22-2005, 03:52
Thanks,
I have heard from friends in Canada about the high prices whiskey drinkers have to put up with. How is the selection where you are?
Ed

Ghoste
11-22-2005, 18:14
Not that good. Not for bourbon anyway. Fortunately, I only live about 45 minutes from Detroit so I get over there frequently. I try and pick up something whenever I can. I wish we had some real selection though so I could partake in some of the BOTM selections.

wku88
11-25-2005, 20:36
Interesting thread. I had the opportunity to ask a true Irishman The Question:
Bushmills, or Jameson?
Bush was his answer, and I concur, but I have been known to swig Jameson's on occaision.

ThomasH
11-28-2005, 15:21
Try Tullamore Dew 12yr,Jamesons 12yr. or powers blended Irish.All are excellent whiskies. tullamore 12 is my favorite.

brockagh
11-29-2005, 03:36
Yes, the Tullamore 12 yr old is much much better than the standard Tullamore.


There's also a new Redbreast 15 yr old out bottled at 46 abv and at 46%.

Ghoste
11-29-2005, 15:46
I'll have to watch for both of those. I have the "regular" ones and I enjoy them.

brockagh
11-30-2005, 02:58
The new Redbreast is available on www.whisky.fr. (http://www.whisky.fr.)

If anyone's interested - Powers Irish Whiskey from 1960s/1970s (http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/John-Power-Son-Irish-Whiskey-7-y-o-circa-1960s-70s_W0QQitemZ6231793662QQcategoryZ1351QQrdZ1QQcmdZ ViewItem)

DrinkyBanjo
11-30-2005, 07:19
New Redbreast? Please explain!

brockagh
11-30-2005, 10:01
The standard Redbreast is bottled at 12 yrs and at 40% abv. There's a new unchillfiltered one released that's 15 years and bottled at 46%. I have not tried it, but am greatly looking forward to having some.

CrispyCritter
12-29-2005, 22:34
The Power's Gold Label I had last night was good stuff, too. The nose seemed a bit odd, almost toast-like, but it was quite tasty. It had a smooth, honeyed quality to it, with a hint of the classic pot-still tang. I don't know how much (if any) pot-still goes into the blend, but for under $20, it's a steal.

ThomasH
12-29-2005, 22:59
Irish whiskey is awesome. Powers has quite a high pot still content and is about the best Irish whiskey in its price range. My personal favorite is Tullamore Dew 12yr. Jameson 12yr. is also very good. On the other end of the spectrum, regular Bushmills is terrible!

Thomas

DrinkyBanjo
12-30-2005, 06:21
I'm a big fan of Irish too and for Christmas I got a bottle of Connemara 12 YO. It came in a really nice wood container. Haven't tried it yet but I do like the standard and cask strength versions so I'm thinking this is going to be good too!

dougdog
12-31-2005, 09:44
Thomas,

You wrote:



On the other end of the spectrum, regular Bushmills is terrible!




You might want to try a Bushmills Single Malt rather than the blends for what is IMHO a better dram... The 10yo is OK, the 16yo is much, much better and if you can get into a bottle of the Millenium series then we got somethin' to talk about...that stuff rocks!

If you get a chance to taste any of these, I'd be interested in reading your post for the tasting notes and impressions.

Does any one get into Knappogue Castle??

Dougdog

barturtle
12-31-2005, 11:06
Outta curiosity, I thought I read something about different Millenium editions. I have a bottle of it that came from Liquor Barn in Louisville distilled in 1975. I'm guessing bottled in 1999. Was there another or am I mistaken?

Ghoste
12-31-2005, 11:21
Knappogue Castle? Bushmill's Single Malt? Man, y'all are getting a fine selection of whiskies there. I've been surprised a few times since the beginning of this thread at how much is available besides the usual Jamesons and Bushmill's white label.

dougdog
12-31-2005, 14:45
Timothy,

My current Millenium edition is from 1975 as well....bottle 32/100 from a "private cask" bottling for "Jackson's Wines and Spirits" in Moraga California. It was given to me on 3-3-05 for my birthday...but that is a long way off from my birthday...so don't know how accurate that information is. Anyway, there is not much information on the bottle for age statement or bottling dates. It is unchillfiltered but watered down to 43%. I haven't opened this bottle to taste it yet.

dougdog

AVB
12-31-2005, 14:52
From what I know the Millenium editions were made on spec for different stores and bars. My two came from Hi-Time Wine and they apparently ordered 66 bottles since I have #48 & 49 of 66. Others I've seen are X of 75 and X of 72 at different places.

66-75 bottles is 13.5-15 gallons so maynbe half a cask was the minimum order?




Outta curiosity, I thought I read something about different Millenium editions. I have a bottle of it that came from Liquor Barn in Louisville distilled in 1975. I'm guessing bottled in 1999. Was there another or am I mistaken?

barturtle
12-31-2005, 16:00
Mine is cask 83 bottle 83/101.

At 25 years old a lot would have evaporated, but I'm not sure how fast it is in Ireland(it could be faster or slower than in Scotland, but would likely be slower than KY). Also who says they use U.S. standard cask sizes(likely but not a given).

I haven't opened mine, '75 was my birth year and figure I should open it for a significant year(I was thirty this year and chose not to open for that, so it'll be a while)

AVB
01-01-2006, 07:33
Buy that birth year booze up now while you are fairly young cause it start geting REAL expensive once you get past 30. http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif

brockagh
01-01-2006, 08:35
Outta curiosity, I thought I read something about different Millenium editions. I have a bottle of it that came from Liquor Barn in Louisville distilled in 1975. I'm guessing bottled in 1999. Was there another or am I mistaken?



Happy New Year...

There was a lot of the 1975 Milennium made. It was offered to people at IR£5,000 per barrel at the time, I believe. Also, as far as I know, only one barrel of the 1975 was bottled at cask strength, which (after 24 years) was about 49% abv.

There is also a cask strength 1982 - much rarer than the 1975. These were bottled around 57% abv.

And finally, there's a 12 yr old Millennium, which is packaged quite like the Bushmills 1608.

If anyone can get their hands on the Powers 12, I recommend you get it. It's wonderful.

JeffRenner
01-02-2006, 12:52
Power's Gold Label ... I don't know how much (if any) pot-still goes into the blend



I'm sure that there is still some pot-still - that's what makes it a blend. Jim Murray wrote in his 1997 Classic Irish Whiskey that it contained an "astonishing" 70% pot still, of which an unusually high 60% was unmalted barley. He called it "a monster of a whiskey of which the nose and tastebuds can never tire," and a classic.

Power's has been my standard Irish pour, but the last couple of years I've been disappointed, as I thought the quality had slid, and I didn't replace my last bottle. As I drink more boubon and less of other whiskeys, I've just kept a bottle of Jameson 12 yo that I also had. Of course, it's nearly double the price of the Power's.

Jeff

brockagh
01-03-2006, 01:18
I have different Powers from over the last 30 or so years, and it has changed markedly over that period. In the 2006 Whisky Bible, Murray says it's back to its best. I think they're using more pot still again... The Powers 12 is my favorite whiskey at the moment.

dougdog
01-03-2006, 09:04
Jeff,

This is an interesting thread about Irish whiskies in general. I've learned a lot here.

Powers seems to get good reviews of older versions and certain newer/specific versions and I have not tasted any of them to date. I have a couple bottles in the bunker and they remain unopened. There is one in particular that might be of some small interest, I'll gather a picture and post here again.

I'm meeting with a couple of guys on Thursday 1-5-6, to review Canadian and Irish whiskies...we might even slip in a Bourbon or two, but Canadian and Irish will be the main thrust. My general Irish tasting background so far has been pretty much Bushmills products, the other being Knappogue Castle, Have I missed it or is there not much posted here regarding KC?

I've gained interest in the Powers and Jameson lines of whiskies since reading here...we'll see what unfolds in the next few days.

Dougdog

TNbourbon
01-03-2006, 15:50
Is Knappogue Castle a find? I carried a bottle of it and Clontarf Reserve (the older blend, not single-barrel) to the Festival in September and found so little interest they came back home unopened. I eventually carried them back to the store and returned them in exchange for some bourbon (naturally!). I've seen it, though, in a couple of places recently.

Ghoste
01-03-2006, 16:52
I don't know if it's a find or not but I'd like to try some and decide for myself. This has been an interesting topic. Very educational for me.
Shawn

dougdog
01-03-2006, 18:54
Tim, you asked:



Is Knappogue Castle a find?



I wouldn't go posting pictures of it unless it was a 1991 nestled in with the Bourbon finds, my Scotch teacher had mentioned on several occasions that 1991 was the best year. While on my personal hunting trips, I have found very few.

I have not done a vertical tasting of all the "current five" in a row, but I have tasted the 90 and one of the 92's. (Not sure which one it was)

I think the first release was a bottling of a 1951 distillation and it gets high marks from tasters, (I've not tasted that one)

The 5 more recent releases started with malt that was distilled in 1990, then a release of 1991, then two versions of 1992, (one bottled in 1999 and one bottled in 2000), then the 93 and this years release the 1994.

This Thursday night, (1-5-6) I plan on opening the 91 and I have a back-up 94 to compare with if we want to do a "side by side".

I was going to take a picture of my set, but have misplaced the 93 somewhere...oh well it will be the missing tooth.

BTW, I included a picture of an older bottle of Powers , gold label that I found...looks more black to me...I digress...It is tax stamped, 750ml, guessing early 80's bottling...If a guy wanted to taste Power's for the first time would this one be good or are there better ones to start with?

dougdog

JeffRenner
01-03-2006, 22:06
My general Irish tasting background so far has been pretty much Bushmills products, the other being Knappogue Castle, Have I missed it or is there not much posted here regarding KC?



A quick search shows that not much has been posted.

I have had tastes from a couple of vintages, but they were at the private BYO whisk(e)y tasting that I host in my hotel room on the first night of the American Homebrewers Association's National Hombrew Conference each June. (BTW, I gave a talk this past June with another guy on Scotch single malts vs. bourbon.)

While it is a private tasting by invitation, the invitations are liberally issued. There are usually 30 or more people (it's really crowded and hot, and gets noisy enough to sometimes bring the hotel security to ask us to pipe down) and a couple dozen bottles. The Gazebo sounds much more civilized, with more savvy participants.

When I inherited it a few years back, it was strictly a single malt occasion, but I opened it up with Redbreast the first year (along with another one of my favorites, Jim Beam Rye, just to open some eyes). I have also brought Lammerlaw malt from New Zealand, and this last year, Four Roses SB, which turned out to be absolutely extrodinary. Wish I could get more of that barrel.

So what I am saying is that after you open that stash in the photo on your other post, you will have more experience than I have. I don't remember that they stood out as extraordinary, only very nice examples of unblended Irish whiskey.

Of course, I don't remember all that much from these evenings, come to think of it. I think that in a better setting such as you will have, they might show quite nicely. I look forward to your report.

As for the older Powers, I suggest that you get a new bottling to compare it to. Considering brockagh's note that Jim Murray says it's back to form, I'd suggest making sure it is a recent bottle.

BTW, Murray was the consultant for the recent Knappogue Castle bottlings and chose the barrels to be included. I don't think the castle has anything to do directly with the whiskey. We drove into the parking lot of it in '99 and admired it, but gave the tour a pass. I think the admission price was too high or something.

Jeff

brockagh
01-04-2006, 09:57
I also have all the Knappogues, although I don't have the two versions of the 1992, only one. Some are from Cooley, some are from Bushmills, and, as you mentioned, there's some from Tullamore. There were a few of these vintages made, but they are all from 1951 now. There were 1948s given to friends. The Tullamores are pure pot stills aged about 36 yrs and are superb - these are as good as almost any Irish whiskeys you will taste. Some of this stock was also bottled by Cadenhead and there's a new one called Willy Napier.

All the other Knappogues are quite good, but not outstanding, in my opinion. Jim Murray marks them very high, needless to say, and I suspect this is because of his involvement with the brand.

Castle brands also produce the Clontarf range, which is well received, but not to my taste. I think they're all charcoal filtered and have a strong vanilla flavour.

The Powers pictured above is an old one, probably from the 1980s. It is so far removed from the current Powers that you would probably find little in common apart from the honey. It probably contains some of the old style heavier pot still whiskey from the John's Lane Distillery.

Anyway, I found it so strange that I was not sure at first, but now I love the old bottles, much more than the modern production (I'm drinking some of the old stuff now).

By the way, if anyone comes across more of the Knappogue Castle 1990, I'd love to buy some.

Regards

John

Ghoste
01-04-2006, 18:11
Interesting differences in the colors by the way Dougdog.

brockagh
01-06-2006, 11:00
Anyone interested in collecting rare pure pot still Irish whiskey might be interested in this Old Irish Gold Dublin Whiskey (http://cgi.ebay.ie/Old-Irish-Gold-Potstill-15-yr-old-Irish-Whiskey-1972_W0QQitemZ6242358531QQcategoryZ1351QQssPageNam eZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem)

DrinkyBanjo
01-06-2006, 11:43
I've had two different Knappogues and have been relatively unimpressed. I've had the 1992 (I think) that I bought about 4 or 5 years ago and now I have the current 1994. For some reason it just doesn't grab me.

Is it just me?

1holegrouper
01-06-2006, 13:17
Anyone interested in collecting rare pure pot still Irish whiskey might be interested in this Old Irish Gold Dublin Whiskey (http://cgi.ebay.ie/Old-Irish-Gold-Potstill-15-yr-old-Irish-Whiskey-1972_W0QQitemZ6242358531QQcategoryZ1351QQssPageNam eZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem)



Interesting - but I wouldn't want to spend over a hundred dollars unless I was absolutely sure that the taste was worth it. I guess it might be a good pick for a quasi-investor/collector.

brockagh
01-06-2006, 13:44
I think it's a very nice whiskey and unlike anything available today. However, I have a friend who is also a pure pot still fan who does not like the Old Irish Gold I gave him to sample. So nothing is guarenteed when it comes to taste.

If you have ever tasted the old pot still whiskeys from Bow Street or John's Lane and liked them, you'd like this.

brockagh
01-06-2006, 14:19
PS - The bottle will include a separate sample for anyone who does not want to open it.

Ghoste
01-10-2006, 03:20
I stumbled across a bottle of Jameson's 12 year old last night at the local liquor store. I'm looking forward to trying it.

Frodo
01-10-2006, 17:41
I don't think you'll be disapointed. Easy pour to appretiate. BTW, if you live in Ontario Canada, Jameson 12, Redbrest, and Black Bush are priced in the same ball park ($35-40) and are similar. The Redbrest is a straight pot-still whisky although I can barely taste it under all the sherry casking. Jameson has some pot-still, and Black Bush is a blend (without pot still I believe - not much anyway). All 3 are very sherried drams.
http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/graemlins/deadhorse.gif
Cheers

brockagh
01-10-2006, 18:49
I think Black Bush is a straight blend of 80% Bushmills malt with 20% Midleton grain.

Ghoste
01-11-2006, 18:23
I am in Ontario and it just so happens I have some B=black Bush, Redbrest and now the Jameson's 12 all together so I'll have to do a proper comparison.

Frodo
01-13-2006, 00:33
I'd like to hear your results Ghoste!

gluce
02-19-2006, 18:55
Hi All,

Well I have to say that I love my bourbon but I love that Irish too. I have tried the jameson 1780 Awesome stuff. Then I tried the Blackbush again great stuff. I then tried Bushmilss 3 wood, very good you do get some of the bourbon flavor in there, additionally you can taste some of the wood but not badly. Overall great stuff again.

I have purchased since that point, but not tried, Jameson 18 yr, Midleton Very Rare. I purchased the jameson 15 yr but I think I will save that for a very special occasion like, something special.

I will try these others when I get a chance to buy a second bottle so I will always have one in storage.

If anyone is in the KCMO area let me know and we can try it out sometime.

Regards,

George

Frodo
02-19-2006, 19:53
Hi Gluce:

I don't know how much you paid for the Jameson 15, but it's not produced anymore. Collecters have gotten into the market, and bottles go for upwards of 150 Euro I've heard ($200+ US).

If you paid a decent price for it, you may want to lay away a few more bottles of the stuff, as there's nothing else like it. Heaviest pure pot still whisky I've ever had!!

CrispyCritter
02-19-2006, 21:13
I have a bottle of Redbreast that's waiting to be opened - but I need to finish off some of my opened stuff first. I'm getting there, though!

Blackkeno
02-20-2006, 00:21
Jameson 15 is one of my favorate pure pot still Irish whiskeys. It took me about a bottle to realize I prefer it by a decent margin to Redbreast and Greenspot (both of which I love). J15 tastes older than 15yo to me. The rich wood influence works exceptionally well IMHO against the extra heavy PPS whiskey.

I would be curious to hear how much it cost and if there is more?

Thanks,
John

PS Doug found an old Jameson 15 from produced at the Bow Street distillery! A very different and I expect wonderful animal from my experience with outher Bow street pure pot still whiskeys.

brockagh
02-20-2006, 00:27
The new Redbreast 15 is as good a whiskey as has been produced in recent years. It is more sherried than the Jameson 15 and the pot still is just not quite as heavy. It would be a shame if this is a limited edition.

Hedmans Brorsa
02-20-2006, 10:18
It is more sherried than the Jameson 15 and the pot still is just not quite as heavy.

Unfortunately, that doesn´t sound like it will be up my street. I will, of course, buy it anyway. There are so few genuine pot still whiskeys around so you can´t afford to pass any one of them.

gluce
02-20-2006, 20:17
Frodo,

I just found 2 more bottles I am scooping up in the next week. $103 US.

George

brockagh
02-21-2006, 10:45
Is that for one or for them both? That's an excellent price. I can get them for 120 euro, which is considered good.

gluce
02-22-2006, 07:34
That is 103. each but I only found 2, 1 in a box and the other outside the box. This guy (Dennis) also has a lot of the van winkle 15 not the pappy 15. This is the website, http://www.oxfordwineroom.com/wineonline.asp.

When you get there click on Joyal Liquors in Rhode Island, and punch in either Bourbon or Irish etc.

He ship wherever, I live in Kansas City.

Later,

George

brockagh
02-22-2006, 09:09
Thanks for the info, Gluce.

If anyone comes across the Knappogue Castle 1990, I'd love to get some. I'll pay a good price. It's specifically the 1990 I'm after.

Frodo
02-24-2006, 14:15
Frodo,

I just found 2 more bottles I am scooping up in the next week. $103 US.

George

Lucky dog. The find of a century I say!!!!

Vange
03-02-2006, 13:12
I know they are pricey, but I am curious about them.

Knappogue Castle Whiskey 1951
Midleton Very Rare

gluce
03-02-2006, 14:30
I have recently cracked open a bottle of the Midleton 2004. It was quite good. It is aged in used American bourbon barrels. There really is no age statement but I believe somewhere I heard it was 12 or more years.

It is an excellent smooth whiskey. Irish whiskey does not seem to have the bite that American whiskey has. I love my bourbon though, it is distinctive and quite good.

I really like the Irish too. Redbreast is an excellent pure pot still Irish. Many of the others are blends but are excellent.

Getting back to the midleton, a great choice, expensive but you only share it with your friends who appreciate what you are drinking. What is great about this whiskey is it is quite Irish but has been married with American bourbon barrels. The two are a great marriage for sure.

Roughly you can find it for about 105.00 but buy a couple of bottles and make the shipping worth the trip.

Later,

George

brockagh
03-03-2006, 00:36
I have a Knappogue '51, but have not tried it. However, I have tried the Cadenhead Tullamore, which is from the same era and distillery but aged a few more years. It's superb (the 42 yr old). You probably know this already, but it's a pure pot still aged for 36 years. It's in a different category and class alltogether to the other Knappogues. There are also a few Knappogues from '48 knocking about, but these were privately bottled.

The Midleton Very Rare usually contains whiskey from 12 up to about 26 years. The 2004 is one of the best vintages I've tried.

Frodo
03-03-2006, 09:39
Good Irish whisky is really good but so pricey. I wish they'd bring the top-end prices down a notch. Until them, it's not worth it for me!!! I'll just go for Redbrest 12.

Vange
03-03-2006, 16:31
Just picked up a bottle! 2004 vintage.

Mad Mac
03-04-2006, 16:17
Connemara is my personal favorite in Irish whiskey - I am a big peat fan, so this is a treat. Their 12 yr old is very nice.

Frodo
03-04-2006, 19:21
The thing is that Conemarra is rather close to scotch. I like it myself, and would pay LCBO prices for it, but if you want a more...prototypical Irish whisky, I wouldn't think this would be it.

CrispyCritter
03-17-2006, 20:57
Well, this being St. Patrick's day, I began with a pour of Redbreast 12yo, then some Power's Gold Label, and then another Redbreast. Both are mighty good pours - but the Power's has a much better bang-for-the-buck score, even though the Redbreast has the edge in overall quality.

Just to go to something different, I'm finishing up tonight with some George Dickel #12 - it's better than I was expecting.

AJ123
03-17-2006, 21:18
I'm ending up my evening on Mar 17 with some Rebrest 12 in honor of St. Patrick's day, but I've already had 2-4 Bourbon's so I'm not sure I can appreciate the subtlety of Irish whiskey at this hour. Funny how what the order of what you drink makes a difference. This is one of my favorite and best-value Irish Whiskeys, but it tastes blah at this hour of the night after going through some of my best bourbons.



Well, this being St. Patrick's day, I began with a pour of Redbreast 12yo, then some Power's Gold Label, and then another Redbreast. Both are mighty good pours - but the Power's has a much better bang-for-the-buck score, even though the Redbreast has the edge in overall quality.

Just to go to something different, I'm finishing up tonight with some George Dickel #12 - it's better than I was expecting.

elkdoggydog
03-18-2006, 10:29
I started the day's consumption with a Johnnie Walker Gold, which is every bit as Irish as I am. This was because it was the best whiskey in the bar I was at, for I love Irish whiskey, but not Bushmills White Label. A few microbrews later on the other side of the Bay, I closed the day with a Redbreast.
I agree with those who have said that Powers is the best value. The Redbreast, though, is a great whiskey, and it's a real treat for me to have it around.

Anyone have any comments on the Bushmills SM, 10 yo? I've had it once, and I remember liking it. I was thinking of adding it to the shelf. It costs about the same as Redbreast here. Worth it?

gr8erdane
03-19-2006, 03:43
I had it once so long ago I can't remember the exact taste, but didn't object to it. Actually picked it up for a friend who is a regular Bushmills drinker. I compared the prices for the 10yr SM to Black Bush and figured the difference was little enough to go for the SM.

brockagh
03-19-2006, 06:12
It has changed a bit over the last few years, for the better, I think. There are also more changes to tweak it still, I believe.

Anyway, I always thought I didn't like it, but took a swig from a hip flask without knowing what it was and really enjoyed it.


I started the day's consumption with a Johnnie Walker Gold, which is every bit as Irish as I am. This was because it was the best whiskey in the bar I was at, for I love Irish whiskey, but not Bushmills White Label. A few microbrews later on the other side of the Bay, I closed the day with a Redbreast.
I agree with those who have said that Powers is the best value. The Redbreast, though, is a great whiskey, and it's a real treat for me to have it around.

Anyone have any comments on the Bushmills SM, 10 yo? I've had it once, and I remember liking it. I was thinking of adding it to the shelf. It costs about the same as Redbreast here. Worth it?

Frodo
03-22-2006, 09:06
Anyone have any comments on the Bushmills SM, 10 yo? I've had it once, and I remember liking it. I was thinking of adding it to the shelf. It costs about the same as Redbreast here. Worth it?

I would much prefer Blackbush, offered at roughly the same price. I found Bushmills 10yr to be light and easy-going, but not hugely interesting. Blackbush has much more flavour IMHO, mostly coming from the sherry casking I think.

Frodo
03-22-2006, 18:08
Actually tried Knappogue Castle 1994 today. Is really a small batch 8yr Bushmills aged exclusivly in boubon casks. For Bushmills fans, it's a variation on a (10yr OB) theme. For non-Bushmill fans, it might be overhyped.

DrinkyBanjo
03-23-2006, 07:25
I have found all of the Knappogues to be a bit over-hyped. The last bottle of Jameson's 12 I had purchased I didn't care for either. However, I had it in a bar recently and it was fantastic. I must pick up another bottle.

brockagh
03-23-2006, 10:00
Knappogue Castle is grand, but not brilliant by any means. The 1951 is a different story, though.

texascarl
03-26-2006, 12:46
I'm seeing a new one locally labeled as Michael Collins Irish on the shelf since St. Pat's. Supposedly from 'Irelands last independant distillery', whoever that may be. No chance to taste it yet, wondered if y'all have run on to it as well.

DrinkyBanjo
03-26-2006, 15:52
It is from Cooley, I hear the Single Malt is quite nice.

Frodo
03-26-2006, 19:25
Cooley's malts tend to be double-distilled instead of tripple-distilled like most other irish whiskies. Makes for a different flavour element. Not scotch, but far away from the likes of Bushmills IMHO...

CrispyCritter
03-27-2006, 07:02
I haven't tried either of the Collins versions (there's a single malt and a blend). However, I've had Cooley's peated Connemara single malt. If you like Islay Scotches, it's well worth getting a bottle.

Nowadays, there are three distilleries in Ireland: Cooley (independent), Midleton (Pernod Ricard), and Bushmills (Diageo, in Northern Ireland). Cooley is the newest of the three, established in 1987. Bushmills used to be controlled by Pernod Ricard, which had purchased the Irish Distillers Group - and there was a period of time where IDG had a complete monopoly on Irish whiskey. Jameson's Bow Street distillery is a museum now; the whiskey comes from Midleton.

Paulbrad25
04-02-2006, 00:35
I was recently lucky enough to be taken to Dublin as a guest of pernod-ricard during the aftermath of St Pats. On the first day I finally achieved my guinness wings which I'd been struggling for in the U.K. (we use a differant gas which makes it more bitter) and discovered Midleton's rare on the recommendation of a bar industry illuminate. I can see why they don't ship it to the U.K. if it tastes that good. costs around the same as J.W. Blue though (ouch). Still not really sold on Jamesons as the Irish Distillers prefer to produce whiskey for smoothness (i.e. blandness) and I'm a big Islay fan. I found most Irish whiskeys more akin to a mid range canadian or a Tennessee whiskey although Connemarah (scuse spelling) I also really enjoyed, comparable to Bunnahabin in some respects, though not as chocolatey. I was told later that this was a relatively new distillery designed to fill the gap in the market for a peaty Irish whiskey. (Though not really playing to the rules of Irish style whiskey production).

Fondest memories will be of drinking my first measure of Midleton to the sound of a traditional Irish 3 piece band in Temple Bar, drinking Powers gold label with dinner at the distillery and dreaming about the 1,200 euro bottle of Midleton in the wooden case in the display cabinet in the Gift shop. Happy Days.:grin: :grin: :grin: :drink: :icon_pidu:

Frodo
04-03-2006, 06:27
I found most Irish whiskeys more akin to a mid range canadian or a Tennessee whiskey although Connemarah (scuse spelling) I also really enjoyed, comparable to Bunnahabin in some respects, though not as chocolatey.

Hi Paulbrad:

Suprised that you'd compare Conemarra to Bunnahabhain. I've had about 4 expressions of the Buny, and except for one (an IB) they were pretty much bland - and I don't use that term lightly. Conemarra on the other hand I found similar to a med-high peated highland malt with something that...doesn't quite say scotch. Plenty of personality and easy to "get".

Frodo
04-03-2006, 06:34
Still not really sold on Jamesons as the Irish Distillers prefer to produce whiskey for smoothness (i.e. blandness) and I'm a big Islay fan. I found most Irish whiskeys more akin to a mid range canadian or a Tennessee whiskey...


As a description of the Irish whisky tradition, I can't argue with your thoughts here. I would disagree with the mildness = blandness position, but I respect your right to say this. If you like Islay and Bourbon, then Irish Whiskies will be a big step down in terms of general intensity I think. Nothing to rival Ardbeg or Bookers. But it does have its own charms - sounds like you found out about Middleton VR!

Paulbrad25
04-03-2006, 12:19
Hi Paulbrad:

Suprised that you'd compare Conemarra to Bunnahabhain. I've had about 4 expressions of the Buny, and except for one (an IB) they were pretty much bland - and I don't use that term lightly. Conemarra on the other hand I found similar to a med-high peated highland malt with something that...doesn't quite say scotch. Plenty of personality and easy to "get".

You're probably right, it wasn't exactly a controlled tasting and my palate was all over the place.
On the sunday we were sat in temple bar and had 11 pints of guinness :drink:and 11 measures of whisky :icon_pidu:(from a selection of over 200) and the most memorable thing about the Bunnahabhain was the taste of dark chocolate (probably enhanced by the chocolatey notes in Irish guinness), removing that and comparing it with the subsequent whiskey may be subject to a little error. I'd agree that the Connemarra was pretty unique and I'll definatley be on the look out for more, though range in Irish whisky has only just become common here since the troubles so I may have to wait awhile.
Luckily I had the Midleton VR first.http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/icons/icon12.gif

brockagh
04-03-2006, 16:14
You're probably right, it wasn't exactly a controlled tasting and my palate was all over the place.
On the sunday we were sat in temple bar and had 11 pints of guinness :drink:and 11 measures of whisky :icon_pidu:(from a selection of over 200) and the most memorable thing about the Bunnahabhain was the taste of dark chocolate (probably enhanced by the chocolatey notes in Irish guinness), removing that and comparing it with the subsequent whiskey may be subject to a little error. I'd agree that the Connemarra was pretty unique and I'll definatley be on the look out for more, though range in Irish whisky has only just become common here since the troubles so I may have to wait awhile.
Luckily I had the Midleton VR first.http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/icons/icon12.gif


Hi Paul

I'm glad you enjoyed yourself in Ireland. The Temple Bar has about the best selection of whisky to be had on the island.

I don't think the troubles would really have had an effect on what whiskeys were available in Britain, as there just wasn't a large range of whiskey produced here. The popularity of Irish whiskey is growing very fast now, so they're putting a larger variety on the selves. And then there's the emergence of the Cooley distillery.

Anyway, hopefully truely great whiskeys like the Redbreast 15 and a few others will be more widely available worldwide to give everyone a real taste of what Irish whiskey has to offer.

Nebraska
04-11-2006, 08:28
Haven't had Irish whiskey for years...and I do mean YEARS. This winter I decided to pick up a few bottles.

Had heard good things about Red Breast and I was not disappointed. I generally cannot find too great of deals around here, but the Red Breast was unexpectedly lower than I thought. Got it for $35 a bottle, which I thought was an exceptional value after tasting it!

I also picked up a bottle of Midleton very rare, but as of yet have not cracked the bottle. This was not the exceptional value the Redbreast was...lol. Of course I may have a different opionion after I actually try it!

Regards,

Mark

Paulbrad25
04-11-2006, 10:10
Haven't had Irish whiskey for years...and I do mean YEARS. This winter I decided to pick up a few bottles.

Had heard good things about Red Breast and I was not disappointed. I generally cannot find too great of deals around here, but the Red Breast was unexpectedly lower than I thought. Got it for $35 a bottle, which I thought was an exceptional value after tasting it!

I also picked up a bottle of Midleton very rare, but as of yet have not cracked the bottle. This was not the exceptional value the Redbreast was...lol. Of course I may have a different opionion after I actually try it!

Regards,

Mark

I'm jealous,

If I'd have seen the price first it might have put me off, luckily I tried it before I found out how much the measure cost me, finding it on sale the next day, i would have bought it still if i had enough money on me. Theres a more expensive one also, a vintage, I'll have to save my pocket money for the next trip.

brockagh
04-11-2006, 11:19
There's a Midleton 20th anniversary, celebrating 20 years of Midleton Very Rare, that's 2,000 euro. Madness.

The first Midleton Very Rare, the 1994, can sell for up to 1,000 euro. It can be occasionally be picked up on eBay for much cheaper,though.

Paulbrad25
04-13-2006, 10:40
Thanks for the clarification, I've just found a supplier for midleton's in the U.K. as well; Arthur Rackham Emporium, about £120 but I think I'd prefer to go back to Dublin to get my own, just for the craic.

doubleblank
05-18-2006, 08:22
I am about half way through my current visit to Ireland. I've liked the Red Breast 12yo for a long time so picked up two bottles of the 15yo. Its a real WOW of an irish whiskey. More flavor across the middle and the finish lasts forever. Much better than the Middleton's and about $40 less. The store manager believes it won't ever see wide distribution.....his shop in Dublin and a few merchants in France and Germany was his guess. Anyway, I second the notion that this is great stuff.

Randy

brockagh
05-18-2006, 14:53
I know Ally from the whiskey shop. I hope you didn't pay the tax (since you're from outside the EU). I got the impression that this whiskey is not going to be continued, but they weren't 100% sure.

If you like your whiskies, I would recommend you go to the Temple Bar, in Temple Bar. It's got probably the largest selection of whisk(e)y for sale in Ireland.

Another good place to go, if you happen to be at that end of the country, is this place in Co. Clare - http://www.irishwhiskeybar.com/location.html .

Hope you have a good trip.

Gillman
05-18-2006, 15:46
Or Mitchell and Sons in Dublin, the last retailer to offer its own pure pot still (Green Spot. I heard too they sell a special 12 year old version although I think Green Spot is best not too aged).

Gary

brockagh
05-19-2006, 00:27
Yes, the two new Green Spot special editions were produced to celebrate the shop's 200th anniversary. It's a lovely shop and very close to the Celtic Whiskey Shop - one street down.

doubleblank
05-19-2006, 09:42
Our last two nights will be near Doolin.....just a short drive from O'Loclainns. We'll definitely give it a try and report back. Thanks.

Currently enjoying some Powers 12yo....its good too.

Randy

brockagh
05-19-2006, 10:12
There's great golf around there too, if you like golf... Lahinch is the best course on the island, although many would disagree with me.

I love the Powers 12, but I think it varies from bottle to bottle.

doubleblank
05-20-2006, 02:29
I've played Lehinch before and it is great. This trip has been Port Stewart, Royal Portrush, Royal County Down, Old Head and Waterville. I'd say County Down and Portrush are Lehinch's equals....and Old Head has them all beat for scenic beauty if you get a good sunny day. Just my opinions.

Randy

brockagh
05-21-2006, 03:00
Well you've treated yourself there. Most of the people say that Portrush and Royal County Down are the best courses in the country - I haven't played them yet... I loved Old Head - we were nearly blown off the course.

I am a member of another great links - Carne in Belmullet. It wouldn't be everyones cup of tea, but some people think it's the greatest links experience on offer. Largest dunes in the country. Enniscrone is another great one.

brockagh
08-07-2006, 11:44
There are three new single cask Bushmills now available at the Celtic
Whiskey Shop in Dublin - a sherry cask, a bourbon cask and a rum cask.

They're all bottled at cask strength and are non chill filtered. The
sherry and the bourbon casks were distilled in 1993. The casks were
hand-picked by the guys in the shop, which is rate for Bushmills.

I've tasted the sherry cask and it's very very nice. The best news of
all is that they're very good value for a single cask Irish whiskey -
79.99 euro online. Might even be better value for those outside the
EU, but I don't know how these things work. Dollar is pretty weak at the moment, though.

hollywood
08-07-2006, 12:25
Isn't that what you drink when your hanging out with the irish?! (lol) H'wood

Virginia Gentleman
08-07-2006, 17:06
In November I am going to Ireland to do a whiskey tour. I am doing the public tours of Bushmills and Midleton and I have a private tour of Cooley lined up. I really want to find the Redbreast 15 year old to bring back. I imagine the Celtic Whiskey Shop in Dublin will have it.

Scott

Bob
08-07-2006, 17:54
My favorite Irish whiskey is Connemara. I love the peaty smell and taste a lot. I'm looking forward to trying the Powers, Redbreast and Green Spot when I finally get myself over to the Emerald Isle. Thought it'd happen this year, but now it looks like sometime next year. Can't wait!

Bob

brockagh
08-07-2006, 23:59
In November I am going to Ireland to do a whiskey tour. I am doing the public tours of Bushmills and Midleton and I have a private tour of Cooley lined up. I really want to find the Redbreast 15 year old to bring back. I imagine the Celtic Whiskey Shop in Dublin will have it.

Scott

Yes, the Celtic Whiskey Shop will have it. Nobody knows for sure if Irish Distillers are going to keep the Redbreast 15 going, so hopefully it will still be there.

T47
08-08-2006, 00:48
I will move my stepping out thread follow up here since it concerns Irish whiskey.
I stopped by the liquor store to check on the Bourbon supply and did not find anything I don't already have so I moved on to the Irish whiskey section. In my city Irish whiskey must sell better than Bourbon because they had a very nice selection. I picked up a bottle of Redbreast 12 and am giving it a taste.
I enjoy it very much. Very fruity nose. Very creamy with a touch of honey.
This is a very nice addition to the shelf...maybe too smooth as I move on to pour #2.
I think I will make the John Power and Son my next purchase. It seems to get some nice comments and is nicely priced.

DrinkyBanjo
08-08-2006, 19:56
Yes, the Celtic Whiskey Shop will have it. Nobody knows for sure if Irish Distillers are going to keep the Redbreast 15 going, so hopefully it will still be there.

I'll be in Ireland in September. Are there any shops or purchases I MUST make?

I have most 'standard' Irish Whiskeys and the Distillery versions available at Bushmills, Dublin, and Midleton.

Please let me know.

DrinkyBanjo
08-08-2006, 20:22
BTW, I'm doing a taste test of Jameson Gold and Jameson 18 (third edition). I think I like the Gold better. The Gold has a sweeter (maple syrup?) nose and it seems that the 18 has a small trace of an off note in the nose and taste, could it be the sherry?

That being said they both are very smooth and pleasant with a good bit of Pot Still flavor. If I had my choice I'd bring back the Gold but the 18 is a fine whiskey.

T47
08-10-2006, 21:51
I was able to pick up a bottle of the Powers Gold Label Irish Whiskey today. I found it a very nice pour...even more so being half the price of the Redbreast 12 I picked up. It had a very distinctive nose that I just could not put my finger on. It almost reminded me of Juicy Fruit gum...I know that's nuts, but that's what it brought to mind. I enjoyed the flavor. I found the Redbreast to be deeper gold in color, slightly less fruity to nose, and a deeper in flavor.
Very happy with both bottles though I still enjoy the Bourbon flavor more.

DrinkyBanjo
08-11-2006, 05:53
I started out with Irish, moved to Scotch, and now I'm into American Straight Whiskies. Where I still prefer Irish for my shot whiskey I must say I like Scotch and American better. There is plenty of good Irish out there but I don't think it holds up to the other two.

brockagh
08-11-2006, 14:53
I started with scotch and moved the other way, toward Irish especially. Unfortunately, there isn't enough variety in Irish, as it all comes from just three distilleries. That said, pure pot still Irish is the greatest whisk(e)y of them all, but that's just my opinion. It's also very hard to beat an Irish blend with a high pot still content.

T47
08-26-2006, 01:10
I have three bottles of Irish Whisky; Redbreast 12, Black Bush and Powers Gold Label. I do notice differences in the bottles, but for me they are subtle. It is probably that my taste buds are not sensitive enough.

I have found in Bourbon's a greater flavor difference in the flavor profiles. I realize that's probably because I have more Bourbon, but was wondering?

Should I be noticing a greater difference in these three bottles?

For my next bottle, here in WA. I have a few choices. Connemara Peated Single Malt, Knappogue Castle 1994, Tyrconnel Single Malt, Jameson 12 or Tullamore Dew. We have Bushmills Single Malt 16 but that's a little out of my price range for the time being. Can someone offer a recommendation for my next bottle? Will I find that Irish Whisky's are just more similar than Bourbons?

I had some Jameson at a bar but I do not recall which bottle it had, and I honestly can't recall how it's flavor compared to the three I now have.

Hedmans Brorsa
08-26-2006, 03:05
I have three bottles of Irish Whisky; Redbreast 12, Black Bush and Powers Gold Label. I do notice differences in the bottles, but for me they are subtle. It is probably that my taste buds are not sensitive enough.

I have found in Bourbon's a greater flavor difference in the flavor profiles. I realize that's probably because I have more Bourbon, but was wondering?

Should I be noticing a greater difference in these three bottles?

I think you should. Admittedly, it was some time since I had a shot of Black Bush but it should be very different from the other two.

Redbreast and Powers, althoug sharing some similar traits, I also find to be quite apart. The sherry influence is much more obvious in RB while Power´s, at least to these tastebuds, is much more, er, powerful.

brockagh
08-26-2006, 03:31
They say Powers is distillate driven, in that it's the proportion of malted and unmalted barley and the cut from the stills that gives it its character. They use older wood to mature it. It is spicier than the Jameson and the Redbreast.

Blackbush should be a lot different, although I still find it has some pot still character, even though they don't use unmalted barley in the mash. It's a straight blend between two whiskeys - 20 percent grain and 80 malt.

T47
08-27-2006, 01:03
I sat down with a neighbor and we did a little tasting of Black Bush, Redbreast 12, Powers Gold Label and Tullamore Dew.
Being absolute novices at tasting the first thing we did was pick which bottle we most wanted to drink from...our first impression and a nod to the hard working marketing folks. Turns out we both picked Black Bush. Nice tall squared off bottle that fits well in the hand.
After my wife poured them into glasses for us, we gave them a good look. We both ended up picking Redbreast, finding the dark golden color very appealing.
The nose: I ended up liking the Powers, my buddy the Black Bush. I found the Powers sweet and fruity. My buddy enjoyed the spice/woody smell of the Redbreast.
Taste: We both ended up with the Redbreast. Peppery, smoky.
Finish: We both ended up with the Redbreast here as well. The flavor really stayed on the tongue well.
So it is Redbreast 12 in our little Irish Whiskey show down. Though we enjoyed all the pours.
I can find less similarity when I tried them this way as my memory led me to believe.
I will save our note pads, and maybe in a month we can revisit and see if we can match our notes with the bottles...if we pick up the same smells and flavors.
So now I have a decision to make. If they have the Rock Hill Farms Bourbon in stock thats my next bottle. If not...can you Irish fans recommend either the Connemara Peated Single Malt the Knappogue Castle 1994, or the Jameson 12.
Thanks.
:toast:

brockagh
08-27-2006, 01:08
Knappogue Castle is ok, but not great, in my opinion.

I think Jameson 12 is super, and usually good value. I love it.

Connemara is good too, if you like peated single malts. The Cask Strength is better, I think.

T47
08-27-2006, 01:15
I am not sure about peated single malts...I have been a beer drinker most of my life and have discovered a taste for Bourbon a relatively short time ago. Now Irish Whiskey has jumped into the picture as well. My experience is quite limited. But it sounds like that might be the bottle to try if I was trying to expand my "flavor" experience.
Thanks for the info.

Bamber
08-30-2006, 04:27
.... If not...can you Irish fans recommend either the Connemara Peated Single Malt the Knappogue Castle 1994, or the Jameson 12.
Thanks.
:toast:

They're all completely different:

KC 1994 had a typical Bushmills nose and taste, but is cleaner and fresher than the 10yo or 16yo. If you don't like Bushmills avoid this.

Connemara tastes exactly like a peated Scotch, which is not too surprising as it is made exactly the same way. Lovely whiskey, but if you don't like peat forget it.

Jameson 12yo is a wonderfully complex blend, with a strong poststill influence. If you like Redbreast you should like this too. It is the only one, which 'tastes uniquely Irish' - as it contains potstill.

T47
08-30-2006, 08:54
Thanks for the info. My only "Peat" expierience is with McCarthy's Oregon Single Malt Whiskey. I tried it early on, just after discovering my enjoyment of Bourbon. I did not enjoy the smell or the flavor much. One of my friends said it is like a "peaty scotch". I think I will stay away from that one for now, thanks for the info.

Bamber
08-30-2006, 10:10
Not had the pleasure of McCarthy's Oregon Single Malt Whiskey. I've heard it is a little young and feinty. I'd think the Connemara is a lot cleaner and with respect to McCarthy's, probably better made (there I go judging a whiskey I've not sampled !)

If you're tempted by Connemara, try some Ardbeg, Lagavulin or Laphroaig in a bar. If you can cope with them, the Connemara will be easy. Ardbeg is probably closest (not that close though), but much peatier.

DrinkyBanjo
08-30-2006, 15:04
If you do not like the smell of McCarthy's at all then you most likely will not like Connemara or peated SMS.

T47
09-27-2006, 19:22
I have a buddy who is going to England in a few weeks. There is a chance he will have room in a bag to bring home a bottle of something for me, and I was thinking maybe there is a good Irish Whiskey that I can't find here in the States? Anyone know what the Duty Free might have as he is leaving?

brockagh
09-28-2006, 01:58
I think Jameson Gold is usually available at the Duty Free. There's a big World of Whisky in one of the London airports, so they should have a good range.

DrinkyBanjo
09-28-2006, 06:22
The Shannon Duty Free had a good selection of Irish. I would recommend Jameson Gold or Bushmills 1608 (I didn't see this in Shannon). They also had some Bushmills "Select Cask".

T47
09-28-2006, 20:07
Ok, one last question. Is the Jameson Gold not available in the US? And if I ask him to look for this bottle how much $$ am I talking if you know?
Thanks guys. I figure as long as the offer is out there, I should try and take advantage of it!

brockagh
09-29-2006, 00:35
It was originally made for the duty free market, so it's not supposed to be available elsewhere. I think it will cost about 40 euro, which would be about $47.

DrinkyBanjo
09-29-2006, 04:48
Jameson Gold was available in the US for a very short time. I know where there is a bottle for $75 if you want it.

PM me if you want me to pick it up.

T47
10-05-2006, 18:07
I was wondering about Bushmills Single Malt 16 Yearold? It goes for $75 here in WA. I dont spend that much very often...but once in a while I might be willing to if the money offers a unique flavor experience.
I really have enjoyed the Irish's I have had so far. I am still trying to pick up a bottle of Connemara becuase it sounds quite a bit different from the bottles I have.
Anyone have an opinion on the Bushmills?

DrinkyBanjo
10-05-2006, 19:48
I have experience with the other Bushmills. I like Blackbush better than the 10 YO Single Malt. I don't care for the 'white' bush at all. I think I had the 16 in a bar once or twice and I believe it was nice. I've never owned a bottle though.

ThomasH
10-05-2006, 20:41
I recently acquired a bottle of Bushmills 1608, which was their 12yr. old duty free only blend. Why they quit making it I'll never know. It is fabulous whiskey. I like it even better than the 16yr. old. I have never been an overly big Bushmills fan but the 1608 is plum stuff!

DrinkyBanjo
10-06-2006, 06:00
I have a litre bottle of this at home, I agree with you 100%!

Hedmans Brorsa
10-06-2006, 06:25
The 16yo Bushmills is one of the smoothest and softest whiskeys that you´re ever likely to try. It makes Auchentoschan and Glengoyne appear like Stagg! (Well, almost.)

What I enjoy most about Bushmills is how they contribute to the variety of the whisk(e)y world. Despite being single malt, it is easily distinguished from its Scotch counterparts.

Frodo
10-07-2006, 11:07
If I'm not mistaken, the 16yr Bushmills is Port-finished, so it's probably going to have a sweet taste. I had a shot once a long time ago. Vaguely remembered that it tasted good.

Keep in mind also that Bushmills is a pretty quiet dram, so a port-finished varient will probably have a heavy port flavour...

DrinkyBanjo
10-07-2006, 11:30
I believe it is three different finishes in one.

gr8erdane
10-14-2006, 03:15
The 16yo I sampled at Chicago Whiskeyfest was described as triple finished if my whiskey-clouded memory of that wonderful night hasn't totally failed me. I found it sublime and one of my favorites of the entire trip.

T47
11-13-2006, 12:38
Has anyone tried this bottle yet? I stopped into the liquor store today to pick up a bottle of Rock Hill Farms. Every time I have been in to buy the RHF something else has come home instead. I have been on a little bit of an Irish kick and saw this...but I stuck to my guns and bought the RHF.
My next Irish I was going to work for was the Bushmills 21...but most of our stores do not have it.

Joeluka
11-14-2006, 08:44
Here you go Todd....


http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthread.php?t=6021

OscarV
11-14-2006, 15:26
I have only had 2 Irish Whisky's.
Tyrconnell Single Malt which I loved, and Jameson which I thought was rather bland after the Tyrconnell.

T47
11-14-2006, 19:20
Here you go Todd....


http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthread.php?t=6021
Thanks Joe, you are better at searching than I! Looks like a bottle I will have to keep an eye out for next time...

CrispyCritter
11-14-2006, 21:20
Tyrconnell Single Malt which I loved, and Jameson which I thought was rather bland after the Tyrconnell.
Interestingly, Tyrconnell is also a Cooley product.

So far, the only Cooley whiskeys I've had have been Connemara bottlings, but I've been quite impressed by them. I'd only recommend Connemara if you like peated single malts, though.

brockagh
11-15-2006, 01:24
I have only had 2 Irish Whisky's.
Tyrconnell Single Malt which I loved, and Jameson which I thought was rather bland after the Tyrconnell.

I think Jameson is designed not to offend anyone, so it's quite mellow and not too exciting.

Tyrconnell is one of the softer malts available, but I think it's very nice, and getting better all the time as the stock they use ages.

Frodo
11-17-2006, 11:28
I have only had 2 Irish Whisky's.
Tyrconnell Single Malt which I loved, and Jameson which I thought was rather bland after the Tyrconnell.

If you're talking about the regular NAS Jameson, then I'd agree! But the Jameson 12 is a rather good "bang for your buck" whisky, and Jameson 18 is silky class IMHO.

Tyrconnell has a more forceful personality than Jameson's IMO - different flavour profile!

DrinkyBanjo
11-17-2006, 13:16
Sorry, what does NAS stand for?

T47
11-17-2006, 19:00
No Age Statement

lbacha
12-11-2006, 15:15
I recently acquired a bottle of Bushmills 1608, which was their 12yr. old duty free only blend. Why they quit making it I'll never know. It is fabulous whiskey. I like it even better than the 16yr. old. I have never been an overly big Bushmills fan but the 1608 is plum stuff!

I don't think it is discontinued, I've seen bottles of it in duty free a few months back. I do have to agree that it is a great dram, alot like the blackbush but with more potstill in it. Another great irish whiskey along the same lines is Jameson's Crested Ten. People call it an old man's whiskey but if you like pot still then you will like this. I like it better that Jameson's gold and the 18 and it is cheaper if you can find it.

Len

Vange
12-11-2006, 18:15
Is it this bottle?
Its readily avaibale in NJ

ThomasH
12-11-2006, 19:00
That bottle is the standard Bushmills white label. It is in the range of about 6 yrs. old and I have found it to be rather dull. In comparison, the 1608 is miles better!

Thomas

doubleblank
12-11-2006, 19:40
These posts make m want to revisit some of my Irish whiskeys. I think it will be some Redbreast 15......one of my favorite all time Irish....and pot still to boot.

Randy

ILLfarmboy
12-11-2006, 23:59
call me crazy but the taste of Redbreast 12 reminds me of orange lifesavers "creamsavers". I thought this was due to the sherry influence so i went out and bought a bottle of cask strength Macallan (a sherry monster) Ick! I ended up dumping it down the drain.

Vange
12-12-2006, 18:31
I am working on an Irish Whiskey feature for March 2007 just in time for St Pattys day. Here is the lineup. Let me know what you think.

Jameson 18 (fantastic)
Bushmills 21 (fantastic)
Michael Collins Single Malt
Clotarf Trinity (3 200 mls, good sampler)
Redbreat 12 (15 not avail in the states)
Knappogue castle 1951 (center piece!)
Connemara 12 (peated)
Midleton Very Rare
Tyrconnel

DrinkyBanjo
12-12-2006, 20:33
You seemed to have covered all of the 'elites' so I think you are a go!

T47
12-12-2006, 21:56
That is one heck of a line up. I have only had the Jameson and the Redbreast. I do have a newer bottle (92) of the Knappogue Castle that I have yet to open. We do have the Bushmills, Tyrconnel, and Connemara here in WA. State. I was saving up for the Bushmills, but have been sidetracked by the Fall Scotch thread. I am now leaning towards the Aberlour A'Bunadh as my next bottle. The only Scotch I have had is Glenlivet 12 and I really enjoyed it. I don't know what it is about the Aberlour...but it has it's hooks in me...I like the sound of and look of it, hopefully the taste will meet my expectations.
Back to Irish's though, I have had the Tullamore Dew (NAS) and now see a 12 Year-old on the shelf, have you tried that one? We have the Michael Collins blend on the shelf, they tell me it is only a matter of time before they pick up the Single Malt, which I look forward to trying as well. I know I really want the Bushmills 21, it's $91.95 so the moment will have to be right for me to get that one.
Looks like your buddies are going to have a sweet St. Pattys celebration!

:toast:

brockagh
12-14-2006, 03:06
I am working on an Irish Whiskey feature for March 2007 just in time for St Pattys day. Here is the lineup. Let me know what you think.

Jameson 18 (fantastic)
Bushmills 21 (fantastic)
Michael Collins Single Malt
Clotarf Trinity (3 200 mls, good sampler)
Redbreat 12 (15 not avail in the states)
Knappogue castle 1951 (center piece!)
Connemara 12 (peated)
Midleton Very Rare
Tyrconnel

That looks like a good lineup to me. I don't know if you have access to them, but Cadenhead do a 13 yo and 14 yo peated Cooley that is much better than the distillery bottling of Connemara. Also, Cooley are producing a 12 yr old Tyrconnel now. The Celtic Whiskey Shop have the Redbreast 15 and would post to America, I believe. You also wouldn't have to pay the Irish duty.

I also often see Jameson 15 for sale on ebay, and it's well worth trying. It is getting quite rare.





Back to Irish's though, I have had the Tullamore Dew (NAS) and now see a 12 Year-old on the shelf, have you tried that one? We have the Michael Collins blend on the shelf, they tell me it is only a matter of time before they pick up the Single Malt, which I look forward to trying as well. I know I really want the Bushmills 21, it's $91.95 so the moment will have to be right for me to get that one.
Looks like your buddies are going to have a sweet St. Pattys celebration!

:toast:

I personally think the Tullamore is just ok, but the 12 yr old is very nice. Kind of more like the Jameson 12.

Vange
12-14-2006, 08:04
The Jameson 15 was on my list as well as RB 15 and since they are tougher to find I had to exclude them. Although Jameson 18 is a great whiskey and a suitable replacement. I'd love to get a RB15 in and then I can speak to the RB12 as readily available in the US. Is 89.99 on the Celtic Whiskey Shop $150 USD? That doesnt seem right when RB12 is like $40 in the US.

Hedmans Brorsa
12-14-2006, 09:35
I am working on an Irish Whiskey feature for March 2007 just in time for St Pattys day. Here is the lineup. Let me know what you think.

Jameson 18 (fantastic)
Bushmills 21 (fantastic)
Michael Collins Single Malt
Clotarf Trinity (3 200 mls, good sampler)
Redbreat 12 (15 not avail in the states)
Knappogue castle 1951 (center piece!)
Connemara 12 (peated)
Midleton Very Rare
Tyrconnel

I miss Green Spot, but I guess that one is extremely difficult to find in the US. Great whiskey, though.

The 15 yo Redbreast is, in my opinion, not as good as the 12yo. A bit too raw for me. The Jameson Millenium would be a better choice but is becoming increasingly difficult to locate, nowadays.

brockagh
12-14-2006, 12:13
The Jameson 15 was on my list as well as RB 15 and since they are tougher to find I had to exclude them. Although Jameson 18 is a great whiskey and a suitable replacement. I'd love to get a RB15 in and then I can speak to the RB12 as readily available in the US. Is 89.99 on the Celtic Whiskey Shop $150 USD? That doesnt seem right when RB12 is like $40 in the US.

Yeah, it's because it's a limited edition and it's 46% abv, and the duty is very high in Ireland. You can pick it up in Germany for about 52 euro. 90 euro is about $115 to $120.

Personally, I think the Redbreast 15 is brilliant, although maybe it has a little too much sherry character. That's spliting hairs, though.

Hedmans Brorsa
12-14-2006, 13:31
re-reading my post, I realize that the verdict on Redbreast 15yo came out as more harsh than intended.

It is a very good whiskey but I don´t think that it reaches the same heights as the 12yo.

I was much more impressed by the Jameson Millenium 15yo, which in practicality, should be the same kind of whiskey, albeit with lower proof. Grab it if you can find it for a reasonable price.