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View Full Version : Do You Ever Get Tired of Bourbon?



Gillman
02-03-2006, 12:38
Well, do you?

I can honestly say, I do not. While I tend to sample a wide range of beverages on an ongoing basis bourbon will be sampled a few times per week at least.

Gary

DrinkyBanjo
02-03-2006, 12:59
No, never.

Joe_Blowe
02-03-2006, 13:22
Every once in a while I think to myself, "Gee, a glass of Teacher's would be nice right now."

And then, with the Teacher's in hand, I'll think to myself, "Wow, I coulda/shoulda had a VW, AAA, ER, a ..."

SBOmarc
02-03-2006, 14:13
A question that I face quite often from my wife, friends, co -workers, children and most of all my favorite bartenders. I have taken to answering the question in a variety of ways.

1.A wry smile with "I will let you know"

2.Not lately

3.No

and then sometimes I just give them the wry smile.

kbuzbee
02-03-2006, 14:20
Well, Gary, as you and Joe both indicate (differently) I am sometimes in the mood for something else. The occasional rum, tequila, Canadian or Scotch. Does that mean I'm tired of Bourbon? Not at all but I do enjoy a modicum of variety. I love WT KS but if that were all I had I would likely have nothing at all for days here and there. Fortunately that is not my reality and I have choices.

Ken

bulldawg
02-03-2006, 15:20
What, are you kidding?
No. However, that's not to say that I don't enjoy other beverages from time to time.

Frodo
02-04-2006, 00:15
Well said Kbuzbee!

nor02lei
02-04-2006, 02:28
Well, do you?

I can honestly say, I do not. While I tend to sample a wide range of beverages on an ongoing basis bourbon will be sampled a few times per week at least.

Gary

Gary,

Well I could say both yes or no. I could be a little tier of a specific brand some times and want another or a Tennessee or rye instead. But I am never ever tied of American whiskey in general as long as I can very between different brands and stiles due to my mood at the moment.

Leif

Chaz7
02-04-2006, 12:56
That's why God gave us scotch. And Vodka, Gin, rum and wine. But bourbon is just so approachable.

cas
02-04-2006, 15:15
There are nights when it just doesn't hit the spot.
Craig

Bamber
02-06-2006, 05:35
Well I drink Scotch or Irish, just as much as Bourbon, but it's not because I tire of Bourbon it's just nice to have some variety.

I do, however, tire of peated and heavily sherried Scotches from time to time. A trace of sulphur from an imperfect sherry butt can go from a minor irritation to a major flaw over the course of a few pours.

Good Bourbon seems so clean and pure, without any off notes to wear me down.

jspero
02-06-2006, 08:38
I haven't yet. I generally like a variety of things to drink (hard or soft). Since I've started on my bourbon odessy, I find myself drinking a lot less of the other hard drinks I used to have quite often. This may be a function of 2 things, though.

1. I'm trying to sample as many different bourbons as I can to find what I like and don't like. I was in a similar "exploritory" phase with mixed drinks until I found this board.

2. I only consume about 4 alcoholic drinks a week, usually Friday and Saturday nights, so there is not a lot of opportunity to go back to old drinks (See 1).

Once I've tried every bourbon (ha, ha!), I might go back to integrating other drinks in, but for now I'm pretty content with just bourbon.

Jay

BourbonJoe
02-06-2006, 10:04
Having over 100 different bourbons, there is a great variety from which to choose. I, too, am formulating which ones I like and dislike, but I never tire of drinking them.
Joe :usflag:

clayton
02-06-2006, 16:44
I balance my bourbon with ample doses of scotch. My consumption is weighted strongly towards bourbon, but drinking other things keeps my palate fresh and my interest in whisk(e)y stimulated.

camduncan
02-06-2006, 17:09
I never tire of bourbon - it's the only drink I like consistently.

But every now and then, I will break out the Southern Comfort for a night.. I might drink it straight, I might add some coke and ice.
On very, very rare occasions, I might have a kahlua and milk over ice at the end of a long day when I don't feel like something too strong.

ProofPositive
02-06-2006, 23:51
Having over 100 different bourbons, there is a great variety from which to choose. I, too, am formulating which ones I like and dislike, but I never tire of drinking them.
Joe :usflag:

Although I have not accumulated anywhere near as many.....yet, I do agree with Joe here - I never tire of bourbon. I have failed to ever acquire a taste or yearning for scotch, tequila or vodka. I have had a number of brief & quite enjoyable interludes with rum and gin. However, in all my experience nothing comes close to bourbon......nor ever will.

Virus_Of_Life
02-07-2006, 00:21
:skep: Absolutely not, but I'll let you know if I ever do. :grin:

I am not saying it will not happen but I just do not drink Scotch or Irish nor canadien for that matter, just too many things I didn't like in those genres. Bourbon and Rye is about all I can say I have yet to be disappointed by, of course I have not had Jim Beam Rye which I read here was nothing to write home about. WT Rye a new find for me blows my socks off! I can only imagine how VWFRR and Saz will compare...

I think liking it too much and wanting to drink it every night is more likely than tiring of it. :drinking:

ProofPositive
02-07-2006, 00:29
I think liking it too much and wanting to drink it every night is more likely than tiring of it.

Now that's what I'm talking about! You hit the nail on the head!

TMH
02-07-2006, 13:31
Yes, that's why god created other libations (SMSW, SMJW, Rum, etc.) Life's too short to only drink one type of alcohol.

JeffRenner
02-08-2006, 12:45
of course I have not had Jim Beam Rye which I read here was nothing to write home about.
You may be missing something by not trying it. It is a different kind of rye from the others - it is the distillate that comes through with far, far less of the barrel. To appreciate it, you must shift your perspective from richer ryes. It's a real favorite of mine. And I love Sazarac and VWF and the like, too.

While it is not a rich rye, it is not underaged. There is none of the feinty, raw aspect of some too-young whiskeys (two that come to mind are modern Old Crow and Stephen Foster rye). It is lean but not mean, feisty but not bitey. You know this is rye with that flinty firmness, fruit, lemon and lavender.

As I have posted elsewhere, Jim Murray's palate seems to concur with mine more often than other writers'. Here is what he says in his Whiskey Bible 2005 (again, original color and font painstakingly reproduced with n, t, f, and b standing for nose, taste, finish and balance, possible 25 points per category for 100 total):


Jim Beam Rye (93) n24 lemon zest, mint and lavender: a stunning bag of tricks; t24 early rye broadside followed by some tender fruit and oak. This battle between rock-hard rigidity and gentle fruit is astonishing; f22 long and flinty with cocoa rounding things off; b23 almost certainly the most entertaining and consistent whiskey in the entire Jim Beam armoury. A classic without doubt.

(Dave M (bluesbassman alerts me that the quote above is invisible in the red & black skin. To read it, you can change to the default skin, or just highlight it.)

In his Classic Bourbon, Tennessee and Rye Whiskey (1998), Murray calls it "The most aromatic commercial rye whiskey made today" and "This is a rye that grabs the taste-buds and refuses to let go. Absolutely superb."

To be sure, just because Murray writes it doesn't make it so, and there are whiskey writers and members of SB who disagree, but I agree with him. To ignore JB rye is to deny yourself a true sensual experience.

Considering that I have upwards of a dozen ryes in my cabinet, I guess I ought to get off the stick and rank them and post it in the other thread.

Jeff

Gillman
02-08-2006, 12:50
Great comments, Jeff.

For those who might be interested in rebarreling whiskeys (I wonder how Doug's experiments are going), Jim Beam Rye might be an excellent candidate because it is, as you noted, not heavily influenced by the barrel. So giving it some extra barrel time might "improve" it (or maybe not!). The only concern I'd have with rebarreling it is it is only 80 proof which seems a bit low for rebarreling. You could "Everclear it up" but that might ruffle some feathers around here. :)

Gary

Virus_Of_Life
02-08-2006, 23:22
OK, you've convinced me, I'll try the Jim Beam Rye. Probably would have got around to it eventually but'll now add it to this weekend's shopping list!

bluesbassdad
02-09-2006, 13:34
Gary,

Well, not yet. However, that could change, if the selection available to me were to become smaller.

Lately, as I slowly overcome the effects of a lingering head/chest cold, I've started sipping bourbon again, and I find that my preferences have changed markedly over the last three months. I hope the effect is temporary; otherwise, I'll have nearly a case of WTRR 101 to trade or give away. One glass was too much a few nights ago. WT 101 is almost unbearable. It hits my palate in a way that reminds me of the first drink of whiskey I ever had, at age 17 years (me, not the whiskey).

On the flip side, I've found that my appreciation for EWSB '93 and '94, and JB Black has increased dramatically. The same is true of Suntory Old Whisky.

My point is that no matter the state of my tasting apparatus I can always find a bourbon that I enjoy -- at least so far. Although the variation in taste profiles in bourbon may not be as great as in a certain other brown spirit, it's sufficient to keep me interested.

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

hookfinger
02-09-2006, 13:41
and then sometimes I just give them the wry smile.

You mean the "rye" smile.


I, too enjoy the Jim Beam rye. But it's like that crazy uncle you only bring 'round once in awhile. I NEVER miss a chance to pick up a couple of bottles of WT Rye any chance I get. I may drink other whiskies occasionally but then I know exactly what I have a taste for. When I just feel like a drink, more often than not it is the bourbon rack I am in front of scratching my head, undecided.

Gillman
02-09-2006, 14:55
Dave:

I think a "palate fatigue" can occur with whiskey. Also, to coin a phrase, :), familiarity can breed contempt. So the lure of the new or not-lately-sampled often is irresistable.

I agree with you on Suntory, it is a very good whisky. Suntory was founded in the 1920's and its people then went to Scotland to search out models and training. I believe the Suntory 12 year old (Royal Old I think it is called) is better than almost any Scotch blend I know in that age bracket. Probably the Suntory profile has never changed from the 20's and therefore (in a way) represents the premium end of Scots prewar whisky better than anything in the Caledonian portfolio today, at least in said age bracket.

Gary