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fogfrog
03-19-2006, 08:58
I drank some Chivas and liked it. Then I visited a Casino just south of Memphis and asked for a scotch while with a friend on the video poker slots. What I got was darn good and I thought it tasted a lot like the Chivas. So the next time the lady came around, I looked at the bottle and it was Cluny.

At the liquor store here in Lenexa KS, Cluny is 15.29 a 1.75L bottle so I bought one. I liked it so much I finished it and bought another. But in the meantime I tried some Famous Old Grouse and found the Grouse lacking in taste, I did not like it nearly as well as I liked the Cluny so I now am favoring the Cluny. Plus the price can't be beat.

Supposedly the Cluny is heavily malted scotch. Maybe that is why I like it. Curious if others have tried it, and if you have, do you know other scotches that have similar taste profiles to this or how would you describe the taste profile?

Some reviews I have seen on the net do not rate this scotch too highly. I wonder why I like it so much since it definitely falls in the realm of cheap stuff!

Thanks,

Paul

fogfrog
03-19-2006, 09:00
Oh, this stuff is Scotch but it is made by Heaven Hill in Kentucky. I figure they blend it up there with stuff they got from Scotland.

Frodo
03-19-2006, 18:34
Oh, this stuff is Scotch but it is made by Heaven Hill in Kentucky.

??????????????????????????????????????????

bluesbassdad
03-19-2006, 23:04
I can't furnish details, but here (http://www.heaven-hill.com/brands-scotch.html) is confirmation of fogfrog's assertion -- depending upon one's definition of "made by", I suppose.

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

Gillman
03-20-2006, 00:09
I think it is imported in bulk and bottled at HH.

Gary

Frodo
03-20-2006, 03:42
Oh, this stuff is Scotch but it is made by Heaven Hill in Kentucky.

Ah! So it's bottled by Heavan Hill, not made by them. That would make sence. I wondered about a scotch made in kentucky...

boone
03-20-2006, 03:56
Ah! So it's bottled by Heavan Hill, not made by them. That would make sence. I wondered about a scotch made in kentucky...

B :grin: I :grin: N :grin: G :grin: O

We do not create it.

Scotch is a product of Scotland, made in Scotland.

Same kinda theme as Tequila...it's a product of Mexico. Made in Mexico.


Bourbon is a product of the :grin: USA :grin: Made in the United States of America :grin:

That's the way it's supposed to be. I don't know "for sure" what would happen if someone decided to start making Tequila here in the United States, or if someone in Mexico opened a "Bourbon Distillery". I also wonder if anyone has tried this in the past? All the legal stuff about producing Bourbon became law (in the USA) back in 1964.



During prohibition, My Grandfather (Harry Beam), and Great Grandfather (Joseph L. Beam) and Uncle Otis Beam, dismantled a entire distillery, moved it to Juarez Mexico...and produced for Waterfill and Frazier :grin:

Bettye Jo

fogfrog
03-20-2006, 09:53
Bettye Jo,

So do you know about the Cluny then? I love this stuff! What is it that you put in it that makes it so good? I am curious if your other scotches from Heaven Hill are similar.

Thanks,

Paul

boone
03-20-2006, 10:11
Bettye Jo,

So do you know about the Cluny then? I love this stuff! What is it that you put in it that makes it so good? I am curious if your other scotches from Heaven Hill are similar.

Thanks,

Paul

I don't think we mess with this at all. It comes in blended...I will double check to make sure this is correct. I've asked that question many years ago...the response might need updating :grin:

You might want to try another of our products :grin: ...The Isle of Jura is a excellent Scotch, so I'm told :grin: Can't vouch from personal preference though...I'm a Bourbon Person :grin:

Click on this link to find more information about it :grin:

http://www.isleofjura.com/newjura/index.htm

bluesbassdad
03-20-2006, 10:20
I don't know "for sure" what would happen if someone decided to start making Tequila here in the United States, . . .


Bettye Jo,

I started a thread about just such a situation early last year in regard to a product initially called "Temequila", but now called "JB Wagoner's".

Although the purveyor can't call his product "tequila", he certainly uses the word at every opportunity on his website (http://www.jbwagoners.com/pages/1/index.htm) -- by way of explaining why he can't use the word on the label.

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

boone
03-20-2006, 10:55
Ya learn something everyday :grin:

Or...maybe they have yet to be discovered? Who knows?

I heard "rumor" several years ago that Mexico tried to make "Tequila" a product that can only be produced packaged and sold from Mexico...That idea "would have" closed bottling operations for Tequila in the United States...I heard there was a big "stink" over it...

I found this information on Wikipedia :grin:

On January 17 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/January_17), 2006 the United States and Mexico signed an agreement allowing the continued bulk import of Tequila into the United States. Without this agreement all tequila would have had to be bottled in Mexico. In addition to allowing bulk import, the agreement also created a “tequila bottlers registry” that identifies approved bottlers of tequila.
Other key elements of the agreement include:

A prohibition on restrictions of bulk tequila exports to the United States;
A prohibition on Mexican regulation of tequila labeling or marketing, as well as the labeling, formulation, and marketing of distilled spirits specialty products outside of Mexico;
Continuation of current practice with respect to addressing Mexican concerns regarding the manufacturing of tequila in the United States; and
Establishment of a working group to monitor the implementation of the agreement.[edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Tequila&action=edit&section=5)]

TMA

For more detail on TMA, see the entry in Tequila (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tequila_agave)

Bettye Jo

Frodo
03-21-2006, 12:53
You might want to try another of our products :grin: ...The Isle of Jura is a excellent Scotch, so I'm told :grin: Can't vouch from personal preference though...I'm a Bourbon Person :grin:

Click on this link to find more information about it :grin:

http://www.isleofjura.com/newjura/index.htm

I've tried the Jura scotch (12yr & 16yr) and I liked them. Significant coastal flavours and well priced. However, say this on whiskymag.com and you'll take a pounding in terms of credibility, as other posters don't seem to share this opinion. Vive le difference I say. They like stuff I couldn't stand - you'd have to pay me to drink Macallan.

Frodo
03-21-2006, 13:12
Bettye Jo,

I started a thread about just such a situation early last year in regard to a product initially called "Temequila", but now called "JB Wagoner's".

Although the purveyor can't call his product "tequila", he certainly uses the word at every opportunity on his website (http://www.jbwagoners.com/pages/1/index.htm) -- by way of explaining why he can't use the word on the label.

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

There is a very entertaining spirited debate between JB Wagoner and Ian Chadwick (site admin) on the mumpsimous forum. You'd have to dig for it as it is spread over two threads, but these guys did go for it like hammer and tongs. VERY entertaining!!!

Essentially, Ian posits that tequila can only come from Mexico, as the traditions of tequila making and the cultural influances in Mexican society are part of what makes tequila unique to Mexico. If you are making "tequila" outside Mexico, you are actually making agave spirit - the inference being you lack the cultural "library" or background to make true tequila.

JB argues that the culture of tequila-making as well as the craft expertise can be exported and there's nothing that can be done in Mexico (related to making tequila) that can't be done abroad. A cultural vs scientific argument at it's (oversimplified) core.

Keep in mind that Ian doesn't like imprecise wordings, and when JB compares asking for a keelex with asking for a paper product tissue, he uses this as an example why he shouldn't ba able to call his stuff tequila. You can imagine Ian's responce!!!! Fun for us readers!!!

Frodo
03-21-2006, 13:23
I heard "rumor" several years ago that Mexico tried to make "Tequila" a product that can only be produced packaged and sold from Mexico...That idea "would have" closed bottling operations for Tequila in the United States...I heard there was a big "stink" over it...

Bettye Jo

Hi Bettye Jo:

Just for clarification, "Tequila" is protected by the same international laws that prohibit "Cognac, Armanac, Scotch whisky, or Bourbon whisky" from being made in a foreign country. You can make brandy anywhere, just not Cognac. You can make "whisky" anywhere just not Bourbon or Scotch.

I'm 100% sure of this.

A lot of bulk tequila is shipped to and bottled in the US. I think you may have found something regarding this practise.


Cheers

Gillman
03-21-2006, 13:30
You know that's a very interesting debate. I know for example some beer specialists state that a beer can't be duplicated elsewhere than on its home ground. CAMRA argues this even for beers whose production locale is being moved with England. Some people have suggested that Pilsener Urquel, some of which for export (e.g., the one we get in Canada) is made in Poland now, is not genuine, not "the same".

I don't buy that at all. I have drunk Urquel for 30 years and have always found it to taste substantially as it does today. I think anything (almost) can be duplicated elsewhere with enough effort. It has been pointed out that a company in Oregon makes a peated malt whisky (it uses imported Scottish peated malt); I find it very similar to many younger Islay malts. It is very much in that family. Can it state on the label Scotch, or Scots whisky? No, but it is almost the same thing.

Now, I have found in tequila that a 100% blue agave spirit made in South Africa is quite removed (just my opinion) from a range of tequilas I have tasted (genuine Mexican ones). That does not prove that a "true" tequila cannot be made outside Mexico, it just means no one has achieved it yet (there was mention recently on the board of an American tequila-like spirit, I haven't tried that one yet so I can't say in that regard).

It remains true that most great drinks do have a local or national character. And so they should because they are products of local industry and indeed to a point local cultural memory and habits ("terroir" in a word). And because of this, most producers I think do not want to bother duplicating something made elsewhere. They prefer to make something distinctive. I also believe that trade laws should protect local appellations, I have no problem with that.

But I believe that, say, Bourbon (or a bourbon-like drink, since the name is reserved to American production) could easily be made outside the U.S. if someone wanted to. This is obvious in fact. The climate in Ontario isn't that different from that in upstate New York, yet you are telling me a true straight bourbon or other whiskey can be made there but not Ontario? Of course it can. The same must be true (in my opinion) of tequila. But again I agree Mexico only should have the right to call tequila, tequila; that is a different point.

Gary

Frodo
03-21-2006, 17:45
But I believe that, say, Bourbon (or a bourbon-like drink, since the name is reserved to American production) could easily be made outside the U.S. if someone wanted to. This is obvious in fact. The climate in Ontario isn't that different from that in upstate New York, yet you are telling me a true straight bourbon or other whiskey can be made there but not Ontario? Of course it can. The same must be true (in my opinion) of tequila. But again I agree Mexico only should have the right to call tequila, tequila; that is a different point.

Gary

Hi Gary:

1) Dave Broom in "Whisky Handbook" mentions that John Hall from Kittling Ridge distillery (Fourty-Creek whisky) makes several whiskies for blending including a bourbon-style whisky. I agree with you on this point - it should be a short step to making a straight bourbon style whisky up here. What we would lack is the familly interconnectedness of the Beams/Noes and the cultural heritage from this. Could we make a reasonable copy? Probably. Could we make something that would fool a true enthusiest? I doubt it. Would the climate of Ontario make a noticable difference? I'll leave that to others more suited to answer.

Similar point made in Glenora with the Glen Scotia distillery making malt whisky. It's not Scotch, but the Scotch Whisky Association is having a heart attack with a Cdn dsitillery calling itself "Glen anything" - concerns about confusing the consumers. Point here is that Scotch style malt whisky is made in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Japan (I don't know about the US). The differences between true Scotch and scotch-style whiskies are a matter for debate (ie. how different and in what ways).

2) With Tequila, the big difference would be the raw materials. Agave grows for 7-10 years until harvested, thus giving more of a terrior influance. I guess if you found a climate that was simmilar, this difference might be minimized. It is an additional variable though.

Gillman
03-21-2006, 18:30
Well, I am not sure about John Hall's bourbon-like whiskey. He makes an all corn spirit but first, it is not a corn and rye or corn and wheat spec; second, he does not sell it unblended; third, I believe he distills it at higher than 160 proof (based on the taste of 40 Creek whiskeys which are very good but lighter than bourbon whiskey by a fair margin in my view). But this is not to say he couldn't make real bourbon if he wanted to. I believe he could quite easily. He couldn't call it bourbon, but he could make something quite similar. In fact other Canadian distilleries used to make a bourbon-type whiskey to add to high proof whisky to flavour it. Some of those in-house flavouring whiskeys might taste like bourbon or straight rye. I just don't think bourbon is (or has to be) that local a drink. It can be made from a corn and rye-based grist and distilled twice at under 160 proof anywhere. It used to be made in many States with climates quite variable, so why not in Canada, or Australia...? But I view this as more theoretical than anything. I don't think we should try to make bourbon. We should continue to make blended whisky, the Canadian national specialty. But if someone wants to try, I think he could do it quite easily: it's a process.

Gary

gr8erdane
03-21-2006, 21:15
Well, Gary, there are several variables I can think of that could prevent a whiskey made from the same basic ingredients from tasting like a true Kentucky bourbon. One is the water. The limestone filtered water would be hard to reproduce in sufficient quantities if it wasn't available locally. Remember that minerals that are filtered out of the water by the limestone like iron can drastically change not only the taste but also the look of the whiskey. And it's as much what minerals are in the water as the ones that aren't. Climate you have already covered. If my geography serves me right, most of Canada has long summers and winters and very short spring and fall seasons to transition between them. And what about the wild yeasts that might live in the different climates which might overpower the preferred proprietary strains? While legally you could make bourbon in upstate NY, would we recognize it as what we know as bourbon? Maybe and maybe not.

barturtle
03-21-2006, 21:38
Actually, at least one, if not both of the distilleries in Louisville use Louisville city water(and that water comes from the Ohio River, after flowing down from Pitt and past Cincy, Yuck!). It (or they) have filters that add and subtract the proper minerals in the water(You wouldn't want fluoride-which Lou. water has added to it- in sizable quantities ending up in your bottles-it's poisonous!) Also the advent of climate control would make the seasons easy to replicate.

JeffRenner
03-22-2006, 04:56
The limestone filtered water would be hard to reproduce in sufficient quantities if it wasn't available locally.

As Timothy has pointed out, river water is used by some distilleries. According to the Regan's The Bourbon Companion, BT uses "Filtered Kentucky River water, adjusted for mineral content," and the two Louisville distilleries use "Filtered city water, adjusted for mineral content."

I suspect that even the rest of the distilleries, which all use either spring water or spring-fed lake water, may well adjust the mineral content.

It isn't hard to reproduce the mineral profile wanted/needed by using reverse osmosis, then adding minerals. It is done all the time in the beer industry. That's how Budweiser gets such consistency in its breweries around the world. Well, one part of their consistency.

Jeff

Gillman
03-22-2006, 06:01
Then too all that water whatever its source is distilled and I wonder how many minerals follow the steam into the condenser. Maybe their role is more when interracting at fermentation stage, i.e., to help produce specific congeners which are in fact volatile. Also, I referred not to Kentucky bourbon in my original comments, but American bourbon. Hirsch 16 is an American bourbon and it was made (and aged at least part of its life) in a climate, Pennsylvania's, not that different from southern Ontario's I think. I'd like to think you are right, Dane (and maybe you are!) but I just don't know.. Maybe one day we can all tour a Canadian distillery which may still make in-house a bourbon-type straight whisky and try it and decide for ourselves. I understand Seagram used to make such a product for in-house blending use only, but I am not sure if they do anymore, they may simply bring in real bourbon from Four Roses or some other source in the U.S. I just know from beer brewing that so many great beers can be made far from source. I have found this with porters and Russian stouts especially. Just the other day in Toronto I had a Helles Bock that I doubt could be improved in Bavaria. Anyway this question is mostly moot since apart from some beer specialties (and it's a different market from spirits) why would anyone want to make such an imitation? Better to make something unique.

Gary

Frodo
03-22-2006, 07:22
In fact other Canadian distilleries used to make a bourbon-type whiskey to add to high proof whisky to flavour it. Some of those in-house flavouring whiskeys might taste like bourbon or straight rye.
Gary

I believe this is in fact what John Hall does. I think other distilleries also do this as well.

Frodo
03-22-2006, 07:34
But I view this as more theoretical than anything. I don't think we should try to make bourbon. We should continue to make blended whisky, the Canadian national specialty. But if someone wants to try, I think he could do it quite easily: it's a process.

Gary

In theory I agree! In practice, I have yet to find a Cdn whisky that makes me stand up and say WOW (like Bookers, Blanton's, Ardbeg or Middleton VR). I don't know what it is...Someone I know toured Alberta Distillers Distillery and tasted a flavouring whisky which impressed him to no end. He ended up posting that he wished that distillery would release that whisky on it's own! This from a malt lover!

Chuck Cowdrey posted a lot on another thread about the make-up of blended whiskies - a core of flavour whiskies surrounded by cheaper ones or NGS in the US. Blended whisky doesn't have to be made like this. John Glaser argues that if you use quality ingrediants, there's no reason why you shouldn't a get good quality blend. His Asyla blend is 10yrs at minimum (he said) but is 60% malt, 40% grain.

I'm not going to get into Middleton VR or Johnny Walker Blue - products made for a different market. I'm going to say that Cdn whisky makers could make interesting blends if they put their minds to it - no reason why not! Just don't get me started on the 9.09% non-whisky component that can get into the bottle here!

Gillman
03-22-2006, 10:01
Well, regarding Alberta Distillers, there you go. That is an in-house produced (as far as we know) straight-type whisky, i.e., distilled at under 160 proof. I don't think John Hall makes that but I am not sure. I think what he does is distill a number of whiskies, each made from one cereal mash only (and maybe barley malt), e.g., one corn whisky, one malt whisky and one rye whisky, age them separately, and then blend them for sale, and that each is distilled at over 160. But you may be right that some of these are distilled under that, I wish I knew for sure.

The reason Canadian whisky is not as distinctive as bourbon is most of it is high proof spirits.

If, say, half was composed of bourbons and ryes, or more than half, and the other half, or less, of aged high proof, it would be much better. This is how I build my own blends. You can too, e.g. take any Canadian whisky, say CC, and add some Beam Black or any other bourbon to it. You have made an improved blend. As for flavourings, I think they have their place. There is nothing inherently wrong with them, but they need to be used with discretion. You mentioned liking Black Bush because more of the sherry taste gets in due to aging a high proportion of the malt component in sherry cask. I do not see the difference between aging whisky in that way and pouring a little sherry into a finished whisky, to me it is essentially the same thing.

Gary

Frodo
03-22-2006, 16:51
The reason Canadian whisky is not as distinctive as bourbon is most of it is high proof spirits.

Gary

BINGO!!! Give the man a cigar!!!!

Frodo
03-22-2006, 17:00
You mentioned liking Black Bush because more of the sherry taste gets in due to aging a high proportion of the malt component in sherry cask. I do not see the difference between aging whisky in that way and pouring a little sherry into a finished whisky, to me it is essentially the same thing.

Gary

I'm a little out of my league here Gary, but my instinct is not to agree. I wonder why. I think perhaps it's the romantic in me that wants the sherry casking to be unique and unable to be duplicated by other (cheaper) means.

I will say that from experiance, sherry finishing and sherry casking have different effects on the flavour profile. I think perhaps the oak that comes from Spain has different effect on the flavours than just the sherry in the casks.

I will say that John Hall makes his Barrell Select brand using (Canadian) sherry casks. If all he had to do was dump in some sherry during bottling to achieve the same effect, I think that would have been more cost effective.

You raise a great point though. People have been wondering about the "finishing" craze in the malt world, and the idea of simply dumping flavourings into the barrell has been mentioned as similar.

Gillman
03-22-2006, 19:01
Frodo: first, you are not out of your depth. :)

Spanish wood interacts with sherry but recall it is used wood. At that point, even first refill, it is a well-used container that I don't think does that much -I believe it is the wine leaching into the whiskey that has the main effect on the whisky. Also, sherry poured from a bottle has Spanish oak in it, so that enters the whisky anyway. Maybe not for as long (in fact it won't be) but how material is that, I wonder? I have bought good Oloroso sherry and added it to a non-sherried whisky and it tastes a lot like one of the classic sherried whiskies. I am not advocating that people do this but I did it as an experiment. Sherry-finishing (whisky held in sherry casks for a short time before bottling) is the same idea, in fact that is where I got the idea from just to add a little sherry. Usually I add it to a blend I put together, as a blending or marrying agent. I think different practices are valid or potentially so - a lot depends on the quality of the sherry or other wine or flavouring addition used - but taste is all that matters in the end. I do like Forty Creek very much, the sherry taste (Canadian sherry by the way) in the 3 Grain (which seems to have disappeared from the shelves recently) is very prominent and it adds a lot to the whisky. But could Hall have achieved similar by simply adding some sherry to his blends? I believe he could have but I can't be sure. Certainly the product gains authenticity by being aged in sherry casks, no question.

Gary

CrispyCritter
03-22-2006, 19:33
John Glaser argues that if you use quality ingrediants, there's no reason why you shouldn't a get good quality blend. His Asyla blend is 10yrs at minimum (he said) but is 60% malt, 40% grain.
Yes indeed, Asyla is one of the better blends out there - it's the only one I've tried that even approaches Campbeltown Loch 25yo, IMO. I forget the exact percentage of malt in CL25, but I'm pretty sure it was in the 60-70% range - and the grain whiskies in the CL25 blend were very old (~40 years).

Asyla is quite reasonably priced, and it has one huge advantage over CL25 - namely, availability. If you're lucky enough to find a CL25 on the shelf, grab it, because there's no more to be had.

fogfrog
03-26-2006, 15:01
So I take it no one but me has tried the Cluny Scotch?

bluesbassdad
03-26-2006, 15:06
Even my frugal son, a Dewar's drinker, says he's afraid to try a scotch that cheap. If I keep after him, I'll bet he caves in. I'll let you know what he says.

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

Frodo
03-26-2006, 18:26
So I take it no one but me has tried the Cluny Scotch?

Can't get it here. Sorry I can't help...

fogfrog
03-27-2006, 06:52
Dave, I heard great things about Grants and bought a bottle yesterday. Grants is ten bucks more a half gallon than Cluny. But for my taste, the Cluny is a bit better. It seems to have in it what I like about Chivas. They definitely have a different taste, the Cluny and the Grant's. I like the Cluny better.

I asked the guy at the liquor store about the Cluny and he said it sells like wildfire when it is on sale. I said, "On Sale?" I mean it only costs 15.29 a half gallon as it is. But I guess it goes down into the 13 dollar range or something.

The thing is that the Cluny is good straight. I think at least the way my taste buds are adjusted now, I'd have to add ice or water to the Grant's. The Cluny has less of that alcohol taste and more of a malt taste to it.

Paul

Also, if anyone knows a scotch forum, I'd be interested.

TNbourbon
03-27-2006, 07:01
...if anyone knows a scotch forum, I'd be interested.
www.whiskymag.com/forum

bluesbassdad
03-27-2006, 12:16
Different strokes and all that, but your mention of Chivas has caused me to lower my priority in regard to trying Cluny. Given a choice, I will drink Coors light instead of Chivas.

One of the more knowledgeable malt fans here told me that one of the malts in Chivas is Strathisla, which I also don't like. If someone were to confirm my inference that Cluny contains that malt, then I could skip it completely.

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

AVB
03-27-2006, 19:31
Damn, Coors light is the anti-beer too. You must really not like Chivas. Your friend is correct, Strathilsa is a major part of it and it is even blended at the Strathisla distillery.


Given a choice, I will drink Coors light instead of Chivas.

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

CrispyCritter
03-27-2006, 21:20
I've always been reticent about buying 1.75 liter bottles of anything, and I also haven't been keen about buying cheap Scotches. Maybe I ought to take another look at some of the cheaper blends (and "bastard" single malts [1]) out there, though. I'm quite unhappy about the price jumps that have occurred to some of my favorite single malts. :banghead: It's been well over a year since I've had any Lagavulin - the last bottle I bought was about $52, and now it's bumping up against $80. :( Needless to say, I'm very glad to find that I thoroughly like bourbon, rye, and Tennessee whiskeys!

I've found a cache of Ardbeg 10 under $30 - while it's hit $50 elsewhere. :banghead: Needless to say, I poach a bottle whenever I'm near that store... but I already have it well-bunkered.

(Hi Dane! If I'm ever down by St. Louis, I'll be happy to take that bottle of Ardbeg off your hands!) :slappin:

As for Chivas, I found it to be a nice, inoffensive blend - but Compass Box Asyla is, IMO, a better blend and a better buy.

[1] Single malts where the distiller isn't identified, like the cheap Signatory Vintage bottlings.

gr8erdane
03-28-2006, 00:44
No Arfgag in my humble abode! I bought it for a friend who lives out in the sticks where all he can get are the very basics like Glenlivet and Glenfidditch. I try to find him something different every year. Started with Oban 14 which I don't mind in the least, then got him a Glenmorangie gift set with four glencairn glasses which was acceptable, and finally the Arfgag 10 this year which pretty much impressed me as what a cowchip infused cappucino might be like. He said he likes it fine though and he's welcome to it. At Chicago Whiskeyfest this week I plan on finding his next gift bottling, one I can enjoy with him.

DrinkyBanjo
03-28-2006, 05:53
Go to Binnys and get a bottle of Bruichladdich 3D Peat Proposal. Sweet, peaty stuff.

CrispyCritter
03-29-2006, 19:18
Tonight, I decided that I ought to get myself a bottle of Fall '05 Stagg to squirrel away, and spied some Cluny on the Scotch shelf. A 750 ml bottle was a measly $8, so I grabbed one to take home along with the Hazmat II, and I'm sipping some right now.

While it'll never be mistaken for a Lagavulin 16, Glenrothes '74, or Campbeltown Loch 25, it's still enjoyable neat - and at its price, the bang-for-the-buck factor is incredible. It reminds me of an Irish whiskey, but with a smoky edge that clearly says it's a Scotch.

It's yet another example that even a cheap pour can be good!

AVB
03-30-2006, 04:46
I found out that the distribution of Cluny is a 15 yr deal with Kyndal Spirits (now Whyte & Mackay) of the UK.

fogfrog
04-01-2006, 16:24
I don't have a lot of experience with Scotches yet, but am finding some of the less expensive ones are pretty tasty. I tried the Grant's again and like it and then when I was on a trip down to Dallas, stopped in the store and bought this ultra cheap Highland Mist which is a Barton's product. It was pretty good too! Now I am back home with the Cluny and it definitely has a totally different taste than the Highland Mist. Its a lot heavier. The Highland Mist is made of Islay and Speyside whiskies.

I found that other forum but unfortunately I have not found any Scotch forums that are anywhere near as good as the Bourbon forum here.

Frodo
04-16-2006, 17:05
Hi Fogfrog:

Just recieved my new copy of JM's Whisky Bible and he seems to like Cluny. Clearly you're not the only one who thinks highly of it although I wouldn't call it a well-known blend!

"Cluny (85) n20 t21 f22 b22. I adore this kind of slightly rough-edged blend: every time you take a mouthfull something slightly different happens. If I were to find fault, a touch too much caramel is evident at the very death" (p220).

As a brief aside, if you're looking for cheap blended whisky that tastes good, JM's Whisky Bible might be of assistance as it reviews cheap blends and expensive malts alike. Also reviews whiskies from all countries. Only issue I have with it is that I can't get into the scoring of whiskies, as I have problems quantifying something that is about craft, quality and expression. Artistic terms would serve me better...

davidrmoran
10-05-2006, 08:57
I just came across this v interesting thread, on my favorite bourbon forum (the only one, actually), no less. Cluny is indeed a fine scotch, incredible for the money. Of course it is not high-end, whatever that means to each whisk(e)y-lover. I was loath to drink something so cheap, but I did blind (joke potential here) tastings of several cheapies, and Cluny and Old Smuggler won hands-down. Most were awful in their roughness (MacGregor et al). Scoresby and Vat 69 Gold were good too, but not as good as Cluny and Smuggler. They even beat Ballantine's, often on sale around Boston.
For a real treat (a kind of cocktail), add a drop or three of an acceptable bourbon to your Cluny (I use the slightly mentholated JB white): just wonderful, more like a scotch finished in bourbon casks. And of course to any bland scotch you also can add a drop of some Isla that is hard to take straight (I use McClelland generic Isla, distilled by Morrison). This takes it more toward the peaty direction of Grant's, Teacher's, JW Red, and so on.
Switching gears slightly, I just discovered a single-malt that might appeal to the most serious bourbonites here: Dalmore Cigar. Despite the silly name, this is a sensationally tasty drink, and strongly chocolaty/vanilla-y/citrusy, in the direction of the greater bourbons, I think.