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Paulbrad25
03-31-2006, 07:41
I'm curious as to the youngest American whiskey, I've heard of one called 'Old Williamsburg No. 20' at 3 yrs old
Can anyone beat this (or find me a bottle).

elkdoggydog
03-31-2006, 09:18
Gotta be Georgia Moon. The difference is clear.

barturtle
03-31-2006, 11:18
In case you're not familiar with Georgia Moon, it's a corn whiskey that is less than 30 days old.

Paulbrad25
03-31-2006, 11:38
should've thought of that myself. Doh :rolleyes:

elkdoggydog
03-31-2006, 13:29
Don't feel bad about not thinking "Georgia Moon" when you think "whiskey." Next time you think "solvent to clean my laptop screen" though...

Paulbrad25
04-01-2006, 20:41
O.k. let me refine my search.
Youngest BOURBON this time.
Does the 'Old Williamsburg' carry
(and why do they call it 'Old' ??:skep: :skep: , subliminal justification???)



2 answers here guys, don't get sidetracked.

barturtle
04-01-2006, 22:12
As far as I know Old Williamsburg at 36months old would be the youngest I know of (though I've never actually seen it). It is also listed in Regans book as the only Kosher bourbon in existance.

About the "old" thing...there are only certain words actually allowed on a label and old is one of them. Anchor Distilling makes fun of this rule by calling its product "Old Potrero" when it is as young as 18 months, but alas is a rye and not a bourbon.

Paulbrad25
04-01-2006, 22:33
Cheers Tim,
Is 3 yrs the legal minimum for Bourbon? (therefore making Old Williamsburg untopable).

ratcheer
04-02-2006, 05:16
I have no direct knowledge, but I think I have heard (on these forums) that Old Crow is also 3 years old. I imagine there are also others.

Tim

boone
04-02-2006, 07:59
I have no direct knowledge, but I think I have heard (on these forums) that Old Crow is also 3 years old. I imagine there are also others.

Tim

Yes Tim, you are right there are other's...

The rule of thumb for a label machine operator...at HH is...If the bourbon is less than four years old, it has to be stated somwhere on that bottling, 24 months, 36 months....

Paul, to be called bourbon, it has to aged for at least two years in (white) oak barrels :grin:

Bettye Jo

wadewood
04-02-2006, 09:48
Paul, to be called bourbon, it has to aged for at least two years in (white) oak barrels :grin:

Bettye Jo
I'm catching Bettye Jo on a technicality :rolleyes:

To be called a STRAIGHT bourbon, it has to be aged at least 2 years. It could be dumped out a the barrel 1 minute after entering it and be called bourbon (pending meeting all other req.). Of course , nobody is going to waste a new charred barrel for 1 minute of aging....

JeffRenner
04-02-2006, 12:41
I'm catching Bettye Jo on a technicality :rolleyes:

Well, I guess I'll whistle her on another, different "T'". (Didn't we used to have a striped-shirted, whistling referee smilie?):


to be called bourbon, it has to aged for at least two years in (white) oak barrels :grin:

The government reglations (http://www.atf.treas.gov/regulations/27cfr5.html) do not actually specify what kind of oak must be used:


(1)(i) ``Bourbon whisky'', ``rye whisky'', ``wheat whisky'', ``malt whisky'', or ``rye malt whisky'' is whisky... stored at not more than 125 deg. proof in charred new oak containers ... .

In fact, of the various American oaks, only the several members of the white oak group will make barrels that hold liquid. The wood of the various black and red oaks would be legal, but they apparently leak.

In practice, I think that only the "classic" White oak, Quercus alba, is used in the bourbon industry.

Often you will read that the barrels must not only be White oak, but American White oak. But this also is not true. I think that Ken Weber has said that some of their experimental whiskeys are aging in European oak barrels.

Jeff

boone
04-02-2006, 12:46
I'm catching Bettye Jo on a technicality :rolleyes:

To be called a STRAIGHT bourbon, it has to be aged at least 2 years. It could be dumped out a the barrel 1 minute after entering it and be called bourbon (pending meeting all other req.). Of course , nobody is going to waste a new charred barrel for 1 minute of aging....


:slappin: :slappin: :slappin: :slappin: :slappin: :slappin:

Good one, Wade :grin:

You suprise me :bigeyes: ...I thought for sure one of ya would catch the---(white) oak---in my reply?

Heaven Hill, uses "white oak" and so do alot of other distilleries...

In the regs it does not specify what type of oak...:grin: It states new oak :grin: ...

Hammer away :grin: :slappin: :grin: :slappin:

Here are the rules...

http://www.distill.com/specs/USA10.html

:grin: :grin: Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh Yeahhhhhhhhhhhhh :grin: :grin:

Bettye Jo

LATE EDIT--------->I see I have another winnah! :grin:

Rughi
04-02-2006, 15:15
The wood of the various black and red oaks would be legal, but they apparently leak.

In practice, I think that only the "classic" White oak, Quercus alba, is used in the bourbon industry.
Jeff

Wet red oak is reputable to give off a strong cat's pee odor. I don't think anyone cares too much about how large the "angel's share" is when the contents smell, well, less than angelic.

Roger

chasking
04-03-2006, 09:24
I believe the current version of Old Crow is bottled at 36 months.

Paulbrad25
04-03-2006, 10:09
Of course , nobody is going to waste a new charred barrel for 1 minute of aging....[/quote]

Unless its so they can write "Bourbon" on their bottle.:yum: :puke: :bandit:

Paulbrad25
04-03-2006, 10:23
Originally Posted by wadewood
I'm catching Bettye Jo on a technicality :rolleyes:


Well, I guess I'll whistle her on another, different "T'". (Didn't we used to have a striped-shirted, whistling referee smilie?): Jeff

:stickpoke: :stickpoke: :stickpoke:
You guys play rough hey.

BobA
04-03-2006, 12:08
Besides Old Crow, I think Ancient Age is 36 months. Thought there was one at 24, but can't remember right now.
Bob

Paulbrad25
04-03-2006, 12:12
If you do remember then I think we have a winner.