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View Full Version : Name Your Bourbon...Literally



gr8erdane
05-17-2006, 22:17
How many of us have daydreamed of somehow opening our own distillery and putting out our own bourbon? Probably all at one time or another. So my little brain fart here is this: If you had to create your own bourbon, what would you name it and what characteristics would it have?


Personally, I'd name mine Old Taum Sauk after the highest point in the state of Missouri as I grew up very close to it and that's the area where I would build the distillery. The climate and geology is similar to that in Kentucky and the area could use an infusion of employment. Plus, it has an unusual name that would be easy to distinguish. Next it would be a wheater for certain. And finally it would be bottled at 98.7 proof (body temperature fahrenheit for you metric fellows) with a limited edition barrel proof bottling every other year. It would be bottled at 7 and 11 years old with a few barrels saved to be 21 later down the line. Finally the bottle itself would be shaped like a barrel with a plastic screw off top shaped like an Ozark Mountain Acorn.

Like I said this was just a little brain fart but I'm interested in what others would produce if given the opportunity. BTW, you don't have to build in your own area, you can build it anywhere....

barturtle
05-17-2006, 22:44
I've given more than a passing thought to this. While a name hasn't really been considered, a business plan has: Almost like a private club, where people are invited to come and be the master distiller(and actually be registered with the ATF for the position) and get to use their own mashbill for the batches they do (and yes, they do have to come do the work, milling, mashing, distilling, barreling and then come back and dump and figure out the right proof for the bottling) Kinda like a summer camp for adults! The spirit would be aged in half-size barrels, because I'm impatient (and because most of the people who could afford this and would be interested don't have time to waste). However my own personal mashbill would be about 82% corn, the remainder rye and barley malt, though it's likely I'd do a 4 grain...probably by dropping the rye to half and using twice that amount of wheat, it'd still be a corn heavy recipe and I'd HAVE to do a rye too. Metal warehouses, single story. With the quicker aging of the small barrels, I'd be able to start at 4 years with plenty of barrel notes and move up every 2 years through 10yo, all bottled at 107 proof. I'd avoid the tempation to do single barrels as blending from multiple locations will give me a better balanced product.

BarItemsPlus1
05-17-2006, 22:50
Dane this is a great thread....
I remember we touched on this in chat sometime ago :lol:

Remember this one as I do truly plan on seeing my product through to fruition - one day!!:grin:

Product Range
- 5yr - 10yr - 14yr old
- 6yr (Barley receipe) - I would like to experiment with different grains
- 12yr old Rye

Special Releases
- Limited release finished in exotic casks(port, sherry, etc, maybe even a wine cask:skep: ) probably around 15yr old
- Single barrel limited releases in the 6yr old(Barley) and 12yr old Rye

I like the Stagg bottles and the EW Single Barrel bottles. I would go for something with clean lines, no embossing and they will be waxed seal with cork tops.
I might even have the special release bottles come with a glass stopper so the bottle can be used again as a decanter:cool:

I have seen many pics of Kentucky and I really like this area, reminds me of where I grew up, so I would have my distillery around there. Depends on the water source too, as I would prefer to have a spring onsite.

BarItemsPlus1
05-17-2006, 22:59
Tim I too have contemplated something of this nature - your private club idea.

I would like to get a group of private investors to have not just one distillery but one in every country...
Imagine being involved in your own distillery...with like minded investors/friends of course!!
- Distillery in Russia - Vodka
- Distillery in Scotland - Scotch
- One in Ireland
- One in USA - Bourbon
And of course I would no doubt have one here!!(in Oz that is)
I think that would be enough...LOL

Edward_call_me_Ed
05-18-2006, 08:04
My distillery would have a range of products.

One of them would be a 100% corn whiskey. Corn and malted corn for the mashbill. Distilled in an all copper pot still, no lead soldering. (So much for historical authenticity.) It would be bottled in those 10 oz green bottles with the hillbilly with a jug that is blowing a cork through the brim of his floppy hat that I remember from my youth. Unaged, of course.
Ed

pepcycle
05-18-2006, 08:13
I'd name it after a spectacular State Park in Northern Kentucky

Big Bone Lick Bourbon

History, Tradition.

Now, if we could only get Clinton as a spokesperson.

chasking
05-18-2006, 11:26
I read a book once where the author mentioned "Old Life Insurance". I always thought that was a great name for a whiskey.

bluesbassdad
05-18-2006, 11:40
Taciturn sort that I am, I found that one to be a true coffee-spitter. :slappin:

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

bluesbassdad
05-18-2006, 11:43
I haven't a clue as to the product line-up and profiles. However, the name(s) would have to reflect my love of dogs.

Pit Bull Pride -- "The lovable bourbon that won't let go."

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

dougdog
05-18-2006, 13:01
Well Dane…

After recently touring the Willett’s Distillery on my last trip to Kentucky and past visit to the Old Taylor and the Old Crow distillery sites, I have fallen in love with Kentucky, so I guess I’d have to move there to make my dream distillery come true. I would like to bring an old distillery back to life. The history and heritage of some of the old places has a certain seductive romance to me. So I’d probably just leave the product name up to history of the site.

The Labels on my product would be derived from Rawson & Evans style period artwork, circa 1870 to 1910. My bottles would be “flask” shaped and/or similar to the yellow/amber “Strathisla” Scotch bottles. (Jim Murray writes about these) They would have screw tops, no cork, thus allowing for longer periods of storage and extended stays in the bunker. The labels would have a place for hand numbering, proof/ABV, (at barrel strength of course), barrel number, distillation date, bottling date, and an age statement.

My interest would be in making single barrel editions of a straight Rye, a straight Corn and a straight Barley whiskey. OK, I’d have a Bourbon too, but others do so well at that I could easily leave that up to them, unless I did one that was pure pot stilled. (No wheat bin in this house) Overhead start-up costs would be lower due to the fact that there would not need to be any cash outlay for a chill-filtration unit, nor would it be necessary to have an expensive holding tank for DI water. (HeHee)

There would be a visitor’s center with a tour that would include benches for extended stays around the fermenters, a barrel opening ritual in the back of one of the warehouses to thief out a sample of raw whiskey, and for the weary travelers, cot rentals for a summertime nap amongst the maturing barrels and the associated smells. Outdoors, the picnic area and Gazebo would be situated down wind for the occasional waft of the distillery fragrances, kind of an “Aroma Therapy” program. Cigar smokers would also be able to access this area to enjoy a glass of good whiskey whilst enjoying their favorite stogie.

In my dream I had lots of money too!

camduncan
05-18-2006, 14:22
*tongue in check mode on*

CAM's bourbon - Corn And Malt

*tongue in check mode off*
:grin: :grin: :grin:

BarItemsPlus1
05-19-2006, 00:11
I would like to bring an old distillery back to life. The history and heritage of some of the old places has a certain seductive romance to me

I have the same passion for history and old distilleries too Dougdog!!!

This is what 'my' group of investors would do...buy old distilleries and keep them operating or as such bring them back to life.
I read Imperial Distillery is closing down(Scotch Whisky)



Cigar smokers would also be able to access this area to enjoy a glass of good whiskey whilst enjoying their favorite stogie.


INDEED!! I would set up a special lounge at the distillery for this!! It would also have once off's and experimental releases not available to the public.(You would also have to purchase a membership:cool: )

Edward_call_me_Ed
05-19-2006, 02:30
On more serious note, my distillery would be in my home state, Nebraska, preferably on land farmed by my ancestors. I would like to do a twice barreled bourbon. Both times in new charred barrels. I would call this bourbon;

Double Barrel Shotgun
Nebraska Bourbon.

There would have to be a windmill on the label.

My earliest Nebraska ancestors came from Kentucky, so, when I was ready to expand I would try to set up a distillery there on land they once farmed. Of course, water might be a problem or at least a limiting factor depending on where their farms were.

I like to think that the Kentucky Vannoys had a still out back somewhere.

Ed

elkdoggydog
05-19-2006, 07:00
I'd set one up in the piedmont of North Carolina, in one of the old textile mills that has had to close down. With a little retrofitting, those old brick buildings would be great for aging whiskey. "Old Tobacco Road" bourbon would clock in at about 105 proof, with a palate similar to ETL.

Every year, before the first UNC - Dook game, we'd produce a UNC Basketball commemorative edition. It would be barrel proof, and would involve a sufficient amount of Tar Heel Blue on the label, so as to remove any supsicion of bipartisanship.

OscarV
05-19-2006, 18:00
I would name mine after me with a colorful descriptive moniker,
Here goes,....

"Oscar Hightower's Hidden Still"

High corn mash, 115 proof, 12 year old
sweet and smooth

BourbonJoe
05-21-2006, 14:57
If I could name a new bourbon I'd call it "Old Soldier" in honor of all those men and women in our armed forces who today, and in times past, have so valiently served our country.
Joe :usflag:

BobA
05-21-2006, 16:05
I like that, Joe.

BTW, thanks for putting the results of your tastings on that board. I think it helps a lot of.

Bob

BourbonSteve
05-22-2006, 09:18
Georgia Mountain Whiskey

CrispyCritter
05-26-2006, 19:11
I've given more than a passing thought to this. While a name hasn't really been considered, a business plan has: Almost like a private club, where people are invited to come and be the master distiller(and actually be registered with the ATF for the position) and get to use their own mashbill for the batches they do (and yes, they do have to come do the work, milling, mashing, distilling, barreling and then come back and dump and figure out the right proof for the bottling) Kinda like a summer camp for adults!
Bruichladdich (http://www.bruichladdich.com/the_academy.htm) is already doing such a thing in Scotland. At 795 quid (plus airfare, car rental, etc.) it isn't cheap, but it'd be fun.

As for a private label, being in Illinois, it would be tempting to go with the Al Capone cliche - but I'd choose Green Diamond as a nice double-meaning label. Aside from being a long-lost Illinois Central passenger train, it would also be suited for a baseball-shaped decanter.

Nebraska
05-26-2006, 20:39
I would work on Ed's farm in Nebraska. Let him name the bourbon and assign me as the sampler.

Mark/Nebraska

Edward_call_me_Ed
05-27-2006, 02:47
I think that's a fine idea, Mark. And I think Ed's Farm would be a fine name for a bourbon.
Ed

bluesbassdad
05-27-2006, 15:28
. . . and your ads could feature two old codgers rocking on the front porch, saying things that begin with "Me 'n' Ed here . . . "

I proudly displayed my Bartles & Jaymes wall clock in my office until I retired. Now my son is carrying on the tradition -- not that the advertised product has ever crossed his lips, or mine, come to think of it. That must be a marketer's nightmare -- the campaign that people love more than the product.

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

straightwhiskeyruffneck
05-27-2006, 16:26
ok, i'll bite..... i really like the old fashond idea. copper pot stills, cypress fermenters and pre prohibition yeast are a must. everything would be hand made. no piping, even the distiller's beer and low wines would be moved by hand. also, i would use estate grown grains. all grown on the distillery's premesis. the whiskey would be distilled at the low proof, (120 is the lowest by regulations) to ensure a flavorful product. my small grains would be the traditional rye, and malted barley. maybe a mashbill of 51/29/20%.
the sourmash process would be used ofcourse, but a staggering 50% amount of backset would be used.
probably very small batches would only be possible. i would have to make barrel proof whiskey, if you want it weaker.....just add your own water! no filtering would be used. ofcourse, water used to make the whiskey would have to come from a limestone spring. preferably close to the distillery.
i'd make bottlings in two year intervals, i think its interesting to see what a couple of years can do. like 8yr 10yr 12yr etc. also it would be interesting to have different char levels on each one like a 12 yr #8 char or 12 yr #4 char. also i like maker's mark's way of letting the barrels cure for a few years before filling with new, unaged whiskey. i'd simply call my bourbon whiskey smith's, after my last name. there would be no fancy bottlings, since the whiskey inside would be straightforward, ol'fashond bourbon whiskey. the way it's meant to be. to me, thats perfect!

bluesbassdad
05-27-2006, 17:07
I have insufficient knowledge of the process to predict the outcome, but your pre-production ad copy has already sold me. It sounds scrumptious. Put me down for a bottle of Smith's Barrel-Proof Select. Heck, make it a case. (Mason jars are fine.)

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

Nebraska
05-27-2006, 18:27
Ed and I resent the remark of "old codgers", but are in full favor of rocking out on the front porch. In regards to the old codgers remark, I find that HIGHLY inflammatory and unnecessarily undo.

That said, I'm feeling a little weary, if someone could fetch a couple of pours for me and Ed and deliver it to the porch it would be appreciated.

By the way, I'm thinking it should be, "Ed's Old Farm Bourbon"

straightwhiskeyruffneck
05-27-2006, 18:48
By the way, I'm thinking it should be, "Ed's Old Farm Bourbon"


perfect!!! sounds like a seller.

pepcycle
06-01-2006, 11:49
Sounds good to me.

(But for Codgers, you might want to put a T in Farm to replace the M):slappin:

Edward_call_me_Ed
04-10-2007, 20:16
Bottled the first batch of Ed's Old Farm Straight American Whiskey today.

Really, it is a vatting of a bunch of nearly empty bottles that I want to throw away. I will post the details in one of Gary's vatting threads.

Ed

boss302
04-11-2007, 00:44
How many of us have daydreamed of somehow opening our own distillery and putting out our own bourbon? Probably all at one time or another. So my little brain fart here is this: If you had to create your own bourbon, what would you name it and what characteristics would it have?



You and I must be on the same wavelength here, as I have been thinking about that very thing ever since I first became a bourbon "enthusiast" a year or so ago (having graduated from Scotch, as it was draining my bank account)...

I've always wanted to open a distillery here in south-central PA, as the culture is somewhat like the deep south, but with a uniquely-German, Calvinist twist. As with Kentucky, the summers here are very hot (as discovered by Lee and the Confederates in the July of 1863), and the winters very cold (as discovered by the Continental Army in Valley Forge), which would be great for distilling whiskey. In fact, I live a mere 30 minutes from the old PA Michter's distillery... or what's left of it, rather...

I've decided to name my label "PA. Longrifle," as German craftsmen in Pennsylvania were the first to create this uniquely-American style of firearm in the mid-1700's-- approximately the same time my ancestors emigrated from Alsace (then part of Germany, now part of France, unfortunately).

I want my product portfolio to be rather diverse, including several "bourbon" corn whiskeys, several rye whiskeys, at least one wheat whiskey, and possibly a barley whiskey. I would consider looking into wine-cask finishing for the lighter whiskeys, including sherry, madeira, port, South African brandy, and California oak casks made for Burgundy, Rhone, and Bordeaux styles of blends.

I would like to follow Buffalo Trace in releasing a Prestige collection, containing cask-strength, and extra-aged versions of the before-mentioned whiskeys. I envision the bottles being a modified, stretched, burgundy-style teardrop shape (think of a Chardonnay or Pinot Noir bottle), with painted logos.

All whiskeys would be distilled twice in hand-hammered copper-pot stills.

Yeah, I know-- I'm going to be at least 60 before any of this can come to fruition, and I might not live long enough to taste the first of the "extra-aged" whiskeys... but, hopefully, it will endure long after.