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TimmyBoston
05-27-2006, 02:05
Now I'm not usually one for whisky food combinations in the strict sense, as I most often am more like to pair food with wine or beer. But BBQ is my main exception to the rule. I make my own sauce from scratch and put in some bourbon while I'm sauteing the onions, garlic and jalapenos.
While I'm earting I most often will pour a glass of good quality bourbon (on the rocks if I'm eating outside) and also have a glass of beer with my food. It's a great combination and if you've never tried it I highly reccommend it.

T47
05-27-2006, 19:58
I am a BBQ nut...actually have the three day weekend off for the first time in I don't know how long. Time to catch up on some BBQ'ing, eating, and drinking!
I enjoy a good beer with my BBQ, but while it is smoking away, I enjoy a nice pour of Bourbon. I was cooking a couple Butts a few weeks ago and I started them at about 4:30 AM. I had a neighbor who was heading out on a short vacation and he wanted to get a bottle of Bourbon as a gift for his uncle. Well it was only about 9:30 AM but heck I had been up for quite a while...and Bourbon goes so well with the nice Alder smoke...so we sampled a few bottles for breakfast. He settled on the Bookers...
:icon_pidu:

ProofPositive
07-04-2006, 00:06
Now I'm not usually one for whisky food combinations in the strict sense, as I most often am more like to pair food with wine or beer. But BBQ is my main exception to the rule. I make my own sauce from scratch and put in some bourbon while I'm sauteing the onions, garlic and jalapenos.
While I'm earting I most often will pour a glass of good quality bourbon (on the rocks if I'm eating outside) and also have a glass of beer with my food. It's a great combination and if you've never tried it I highly reccommend it.

This sounds like a great combination for later today!

Happy & Safe 4th of July to All!!!!!!!!!!

TimmyBoston
08-02-2006, 00:44
I decided to bring out my smoker this weekend and smoke up some babyback ribs. I marinaded them overnight in a mixture of water, salt, brown sugar, cayenne, chili powder, coriander, cumin, oregano, thyme, molasses, maple syrup, apple cider vinegar, grey poupon, and a healthy dose of bourbon. The ribs came out great. The boubon was a great additive to the marinade. I'm going to try the same thing with some brisket soon.

whitepine
11-19-2006, 01:55
bbq and bourbon are siblings, and my favorite homemade bbq sauces
are made with bourbon. I`ve tried many different bourbons in sauces.
best stuff there is on pork butt:bowdown:

ratcheer
11-19-2006, 07:49
I am also a major barbecue fanatic, but I enjoy my bourbon while I am cooking it or an hour or more after the meal. I have never enjoyed spirits with a meal. Beer, wine, iced tea, or soft drinks, but never liquor.

If I am having a drink in a restaurant and they bring out food before I have finished it, I will not touch the food until the drink is done.

That's just me. :cool:

Tim

TimmyBoston
12-05-2006, 00:28
What I really like with BBQ is either a brown zinfandel or a kentucky iced tea. And thanks to Tim for bringing both of these drinks to my attention.

T47
12-05-2006, 23:06
I am also a major barbecue fanatic, but I enjoy my bourbon while I am cooking it or an hour or more after the meal. I have never enjoyed spirits with a meal. Beer, wine, iced tea, or soft drinks, but never liquor

I find this pretty much true for myself as well. I do enjoy a nice Bourbon while the cook is going on...just goes perfect with the smoke coming off the cooker. I can understand the cigar connection for some people, but BBQ smoke is as close as I think I will come to that. Maybe I can find a Cuban wood to use!
I do enjoy a nice cool beer while eating, or a tall ice water.
What kind of cookers do you guys use? I have a Large BGE w/guru and a WSM.
I know I covet at times...but for me I think I am at my most relaxed content place when I have the family hanging out playing croquet, and I am sitting back on the deck downwind from the BBQ with a nice pour of Bourbon in my hand...makes me realize how really blessed I have been.

ggilbertva
12-13-2006, 07:18
Here's one. I watched Fred Noe pour a whole bottle of Bookers over a grill full of thick pork chops, and then...light it on fire. It was deeelicious.

OscarV
12-13-2006, 12:54
I am also a major barbecue fanatic,

Tim



Hey Tim,
You ever eat at Jim 'N Nick's Bar-B-Q in Gardendale?
We were there in '04 and the ribs were awesome, they had Heineken on draft, I was in heaven.

Empty Glass
12-19-2006, 15:57
My brother in-law is alergic to fowl so for Thanksgiving dinner along side the Turkey that I smoked on the grill I also cooked a rabbit that I had marinaded over night in a variety of spices, oils, salts, onions and the remainder of my decanter of JD. While not a bourbon, I could not part with even an once of the Blanton's that I was drinking at the time, I tossed my bunny on the grill an hour before the turkey was ready and smoked it heavy with crab-apple wood. After an hour I pulled off Bugs, stripped off the meat (it wasn't that presentable with the little legs sticking up) and pan fried the meat in olive oil, the remainder of the onions and the last few drops of JD and served it searing in the iron pan. Everyone who sampled it found it wonderful. Had I known that it was going to be a hit I would have grabbed that beaver that I saw rundover in road the day befoe. There's aways next year.

ratcheer
12-19-2006, 16:00
What a creative idea, Empty Glass. It sounds wonderful!

Tim

FlashPuppy
12-19-2006, 20:25
My brother in-law is alergic to fowl so for Thanksgiving dinner along side the Turkey that I smoked on the grill I also cooked a rabbit that I had marinaded over night in a variety of spices, oils, salts, onions and the remainder of my decanter of JD. While not a bourbon, I could not part with even an once of the Blanton's that I was drinking at the time, I tossed my bunny on the grill an hour before the turkey was ready and smoked it heavy with crab-apple wood. After an hour I pulled off Bugs, stripped off the meat (it wasn't that presentable with the little legs sticking up) and pan fried the meat in olive oil, the remainder of the onions and the last few drops of JD and served it searing in the iron pan. Everyone who sampled it found it wonderful. Had I known that it was going to be a hit I would have grabbed that beaver that I saw rundover in road the day befoe. There's aways next year.

I think it's time to oil up the 'ole .410.

cowdery
12-19-2006, 21:19
The Talbot Tavern in Bardstown used to have rabbit on the menu. My only experience with the critter, but I thought it was pretty good.

An ex-girlfriend of mine, a Kentucky girl through and through, told me that her first husband used to go out in the morning and shoot a couple of squirrels, which she would fry up for breakfast.

I can hear it now: Squirrel, it's not just for breakfast anymore.

TNbourbon
12-19-2006, 21:41
Ah, rabbits, squirrels -- shot 'em, cleaned 'em, cooked 'em, ate 'em. Life just ain't like it used to be.
By the way, I'd think a rye-y bourbon, say, Wild Turkey 101 or Kentucky Spirit, would be a fine pairing with small game.

Empty Glass
12-20-2006, 07:27
The neighbor's cat has been a little annoying lately...

FlashPuppy
12-20-2006, 07:29
You don't see any stray dogs in mexico....:skep:

CrispyCritter
12-20-2006, 21:22
At the time, I only drank beer, but I once went to a wild game feast at a bar in Allegan, Michigan when my sister lived there. They had venison, elk, antelope, and rabbit at the very least, and there was more as well that I didn't get a chance to try because I was already full.

All of it was delicious! It went well with the beer, and I'm sure it would have gone well with bourbon as well.

I've caught and cleaned plenty of fish over the years, but I've never gone hunting - not out of any objection, but out of lack of skills and opportunities...

FlashPuppy
12-20-2006, 22:04
At the time, I only drank beer, but I once went to a wild game feast at a bar in Allegan, Michigan when my sister lived there. They had venison, elk, antelope, and rabbit at the very least, and there was more as well that I didn't get a chance to try because I was already full.

All of it was delicious! It went well with the beer, and I'm sure it would have gone well with bourbon as well.

I've caught and cleaned plenty of fish over the years, but I've never gone hunting - not out of any objection, but out of lack of skills and opportunities...


When I get back round Indiana way, I got a shotguun with your name on it and my parents got a field full of pheasent.

TNbourbon
12-20-2006, 22:08
...I once went to a wild game feast at a bar in Allegan, Michigan when my sister lived there. They had venison, elk, antelope, and rabbit at the very least...

:bigeyes: Small world time -- I grew up in rural Allegan; graduated from Allegan High School (Class of 1975).
We rural folk hunted pretty much September-March for various small/large game -- at least, until the freezer was full. I suspect the elk and antelope came from elsewhere, though...:skep:

ILLfarmboy
12-20-2006, 23:01
All this talk of game meats reminds me of the first time I saw on old neighbor lady cooking coons. She pulled 'em out of the oven and I swear to God they resembled human babes (at least to my 7 yr old eyes)

Barbecued coon is quite good if a bit greasy.

CrispyCritter
12-21-2006, 22:01
When I get back round Indiana way, I got a shotguun with your name on it and my parents got a field full of pheasent.

Hmmmm... sounds like a nice day in the country - though it might be better for me to start out with clay pigeons first to get the hang of a shotgun. I'm a decent shot with a Sheridan air rifle at least... but here in the People's Republic of Illinois you have to get an FOI card to own an actual firearm. :hot: Just ask Bears defensive end Tank Johnson.


:bigeyes: Small world time -- I grew up in rural Allegan; graduated from Allegan High School (Class of 1975).

Small world indeed! My sister lived there from about 1989?-1993 or so, then lived near Reed City, then Evart, now Midland.

Solomon2
01-17-2007, 17:14
Most of the time BBQ and bourbon go together fine, but I also like to grill hot dogs. What bourbon goes with hot dogs?

barturtle
01-17-2007, 18:44
Most of the time BBQ and bourbon go together fine, but I also like to grill hot dogs. What bourbon goes with hot dogs?

That depends on how you eat you dawgs:

Chili dog..something full and smoky...Stagg, maybe
Ketchup only...sweeter, maybe VSOF
Mustard...spicy...WT101
Relish...tangy...EW 1789
Plain dog, no bun...Bernhiem Wheat

Any more questions?:lol:

T47
01-17-2007, 20:14
I think Bourbon and BBQ goes well together...slow smoking and slow drinking. Grilling on the other hand...thats high heat flash cooking! For me thats more Beer cooking. Maybe once I am done grilling and eating and I can sit down and relax, then it's time to break out the Bourbon.

marinade
09-15-2007, 16:40
Hey Dudes and Dudettes, try this glaze:

Maple-Bourbon Glaze
Makes 1 cup

Timetable: Shrimp, chicken wings, pork chops or cutlets, baby back ribs, or spareribs: baste during the last 5 minutes of cooking

The sweet flavors of maple syrup and bourbon are gently tempered by orange so that the glaze doesn’t taste overly sweet, but instead deep and savory.

1/2 cup maple syrup
1/2 cup bourbon or sour mash whiskey
1/2 cup cider vinegar
Grated zest and juice of 2 juice oranges (about 1/2 cup)
1 tablespoon dark brown sugar
1/4 cup brown or full-flavored yellow mustard
1/4 teaspoon cayenne
1/4 cup soy or tamari sauce

In a heavy nonreactive saucepan, add the maple syrup, bourbon, vinegar, orange zest and juice, brown sugar, mustard, cayenne, and soy sauce. Bring to a simmer and simmer for about 30 minutes, until reduced to 1 cup. Cool the glaze, store in a clean, airtight container, and refrigerate until ready to use. The glaze can be made ahead and will keep in the refrigerator for 3 weeks. To use the glaze after refrigerating, warm it over medium heat, stirring occasionally.



Jim Tarantino
Marinades, Rubs, Brines, Cures, & Glazes
Pub. 2006 Ten Speed Press, Berkeley CA,

mgilbertva
09-15-2007, 17:19
I was at Old Glory in Georgetown (Washington, D.C.). I ordered a combination of lamb BBQ and Jalapeno Sausage. On a whim I ordered PVWFR Rye. Oh my, that went well with the lamb. Absolutely amazing. I am now a convert to Rye and BBQ, especially a smoky style.

On the other hand, the spicy sausage and Rye was a not-so-successful experiment.

craigthom
09-21-2007, 15:37
This summer I went to a local cooperage (how cool is it to be able to say that?) and picked up some used bourbon barrel staves. I cut those into chunks and used them for smoking some pork shoulders.

I ended up cutting them with some hickory chunks and some apple for subsequent attempts. I need to try some beef over the bourbon barrels (just don't tell my family, since I'm from Georgia, and barbecuing beef is, I believe, a criminal offense down there.)

bluesbassdad
09-21-2007, 19:13
Just to round out the barbecue scene, you might do a search on either ' "santa maria" style' or ' "lompoc style" barbecue ' -- without the single quotes.

Having grown up in the midwest I thought all barbecue was hickory smoked and served with a tangy, slightly thick, red sauce. I learned different when I happened to order barbecue at a roadside joint in San Luis Obispo shortly after moving to CA in the 70s.

The barbecue in that region is rubbed with spices and smoked over red oak. I found it to be an acquired taste, in a sense. By the third bite I was hooked.

Even so, I still don't think of it as "real" barbecue.

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

mrt
09-22-2007, 03:27
Just give a try to raki as a companion with BBQ. That will be a good alternative, too. I take the full responsibility :)

doubleblank
10-24-2007, 09:23
BBQ and bourbon definitely go together. As many here know (some have attended), Jeff, Perry, myself and a few other friends throw a Carnivore Carnival every six months or so....kind of a spring and fall thing. The menu has stayed fairly static the last few years.

Two 40lb pigs
256 home made enchilladas (green sauce, red sauce and mole)
Smoked Pork Loin
Smoked Rib Eye Roasts, bone in
Chicken
Sausage
Leg of Lamb
Pasta Salad
Green Salad

We always make several BBQ sauces because of the variety of meats cooked. One is always a mustard/vinegar Carolina style sauce and my favortie is a bourbon sauce. Mike (the guy that owns the Southern Pride pit) and I usually go into the kitchen while the pigs are smoking and put a bourbon based sauce together. Ketchup, onions, jalepenos, chipotle peppers, mustard, garlic, brown sugar, and bourbon always make it into the mix. We add other spices and ingredients to our taste.

For drinks, we go with fall seasonal beers, red wine and bourbon. This year we served the ETL SB's (purchased last September by KBS members) and it went great with all of the BBQ. The sweetness of ETL went great with the smokiness of the meats and the heat from the BBQ sauces. Beer was best for washing down the enchilladas.

The pics are the pigs, the pit and one of the reasons we do these things.

Randy

OscarV
10-24-2007, 12:38
Looks like some good food, good equipment and some very good reasons to do so.:cool:

MamaTried
07-29-2008, 06:44
Eastern North Carolina bbq and bourbon go well together. For me, it doesn't get better than a pound of Q from Allen and Sons in Chapel Hill, and a big ol Basin Street made with Elmer T. Lee.

StraightBoston
07-29-2008, 09:43
I'm a big fan of bourbon in the BBQ -- marinade, glaze, etc. -- but not so much with the BBQ. I usually need something colder and liquider(?) to wash it down.

(Truth be told, I'm usually happiest with homemade lemonade unless there's a keg on hand!)

On the other hand, the idea of the "Kentucky iced tea" might be a refreshing alternative -- I'll give it a try.

ILLfarmboy
10-04-2008, 14:25
I was thinking of this thread when I selected my libation to go along with last night's supper. We had BBQ'd pork shoulder steaks cooked on the grill and home made scalloped potatoes. Janean had a Pinot grigio and I selected to polish off an open bottle of Weller Antique.

I selected the antique for its sweetness so as to go along with the BBQ sauce we used, Cattleman's smoke house. Were it not for the fact that the bottle of Antique only had a few pours left I might have went with ORVW 107. Because of the sweet smoky 'molasses' sauce I think the ORVW would have been the better choice. But it was a good meal nonetheless.

The whiskey lasted longer than the meat, as it usually does. The rest of the evening was spent sipping and watching a few of the new fall shows/ episodes that we've recorded on the DVR.