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wadewood
06-09-2006, 09:35
There is a post in the Industry news section about a new KY distillery being started by Ray Jamieson. I googled his name and it looks like he is partners with the Benjamin Prichardís Double Barreled Bourbon brand as well a bourbon based orange-apricot spirit called Sweet Lucy.

Gillman
06-09-2006, 09:41
Wade, I wonder of the spirit liqueur category is gaining legs. I saw a new Macallan 25% abv liqueur in our market recently which incorporates the famous whisky and flavourings of various kinds.

Gary

MikeK
06-09-2006, 09:56
Gary, Do you mean the Macallan maple flavored (scotch)? It has been popping up in a LOT of stores in my area. I tried it last year at a tasting. Is was very tasty, tasted like maple syrup. I don't know if I'd like to drink it all the time but it might be good on pancakes :)

Gillman
06-09-2006, 10:04
Mike, I think so, it comes in a heavy glass decanter-style bottle. I know in cognac the idea took off some years ago, blending cognac with flavorings and selling it at a liqueur proof. I think Alize was one of those products, maybe the idea spread from there to whiskey. It's always been around of course, e.g. the WT liqueur but it's being given a new spin with elegant packaging, different names, etc.

Gary

scopenut
06-09-2006, 10:49
Has anyone heard of/tried Phillips Union, a blend of bourbon and Canadian whiskey? Comes in plain, vanilla, and cherry flavors. Sounds like whiskey for non-whiskey drinkers.

Kevin

clayton
06-09-2006, 11:16
There was a thread about the Philips Union stuff.

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3742

boone
06-09-2006, 12:18
There is a post in the Industry news section about a new KY distillery being started by Ray Jamieson. I googled his name and it looks like he is partners with the Benjamin Prichardís Double Barreled Bourbon brand as well a bourbon based orange-apricot spirit called Sweet Lucy.

Do you know if it's a "real" distillery?...Are there mash tubs, cistern room, warehouses? Will they create product?

Gillman
06-09-2006, 12:45
Seems so, see the concurrent post from Omar on this.

Gary

ThomasH
06-09-2006, 18:41
I have had the regular Phillips Union whiskey and found it to be quite tasty. I also look forward to trying the cherry version!

Thomas

Hedmans Brorsa
06-10-2006, 01:57
I think this is fantastic news, indeed! Hope they will be able to pull it through.

Keep my fingers crossed!

JeffRenner
06-13-2006, 06:06
Seems so, see the concurrent post from Omar on this.

Also see a more complete news story with a photo of the construction here (http://news.mywebpal.com/partners/955/public/news724666.html).

Isn't this a dream many of us have thought we'd love to pursue if only we would win the lottery? (Note to self - you have to buy a ticket to win. :lol: )

The problem with a micro-distillery, as opposed to a microbrewery, of course, is that you can't make whiskey and send it out the loading dock right away. I wonder if he will make some unaged product for cash flow, the way Anchor Distillery makes Junipero gin. Or maybe he'll wait two or (I would hope) four years to bottle the bourbon.

Jeff

Gillman
06-13-2006, 06:22
Jeff, I think there was mention of a bourbon cordial which will soon be released. If so it is good thinking: for now, they can source the bourbon in bulk on the market, make the liqueur, establish the name and later put out their own bourbon under the same or a similar name. That way too any taste difference between the bought and own-made bourbon would not be significant (since the former would have been flavoured to make the liqueur). Or maybe they will make and sell a vodka or corn or young rye whiskey pending the maturation of the bourbon. Anyway it is great news, one of the first new facilities in a long time (since the 50's) to make bourbon. The other ones I'm aware of are a craft distillery in New York which soon will offer a very young bourbon to market through Lenell's in New York, and a craft operation in Cincinnati which will release before long a fully aged bourbon - also exciting developments. It is good to see entrepreneurship and innovation in this arena. I believe there are major opportunities out there. It won't be easy, of course, but some will succeed (hopefully all of them). They have my admiration.

Gary

Hedmans Brorsa
06-13-2006, 08:34
Thanks for the link, Jeff!

Interesting reading, although some things never seem to change. In the article they claim that he has been working in the Tennessee bourbon industry for the last four or five years.

What bourbon industry in Tennessee? :grin:

cowdery
06-13-2006, 13:12
The article contains a couple of misstatements, which I choose to attribute to journalist Forrest Martin rather than to Jamieson. I do wonder, though, that if he thinks this is the first new distillery built in Kentucky in 30 years, what distillery was built in 1976 or thereabouts?

As for having something to sell right away, there is always the Woodford option, i.e., create a brand using someone else's whiskey so you have something to sell until your product is ready.

I do, however, find something appealing about selling white dog.

wadewood
06-13-2006, 18:11
What bourbon industry in Tennessee? :grin:

Benjamin Prichardís Double Barreled Bourbon

Hedmans Brorsa
06-13-2006, 23:21
Benjamin Prichardís Double Barreled Bourbon

A 'phoney bottling' doth not an industry make, methinks. ;)

CrispyCritter
06-17-2006, 20:20
How do we define "phony," though? I'd never call any Van Winkle product "phony," even though Julian contracts with existing distilleries to make his products.

Hedmans Brorsa
06-18-2006, 02:32
How do we define "phony," though? I'd never call any Van Winkle product "phony," even though Julian contracts with existing distilleries to make his products.

We know where it comes from, I guess. Plus the bottles arenīt overdone and the prices are usually humane. Compare for instance with the Jefferson products, which to me, embodies the phoney bottling.