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thehighking
07-24-2006, 15:55
Hi all, I'm a lurker here...my story: I'm a huge single malt Scotch fan who has very recently gotten into Bourbons (i.e. past year or so.)

I've decided to spend this year most focusing on trying more Bourbons and building up a Bourbon stock/collection. (Part of this is due to really liking Bourbon and part of it is due to wanting to spend less money on liquor!)

Here's what I've tried so far: GTS (this year and last), Maker's Mark, Knob Creek, Virginia Gentleman, Henry McKenna, 1792 Ridgmont Reserve, and Elijah Craig 12. (Oh, and I've also had Gentleman Jack, which I know isn't a bourbon, but which I did like.)

I absolutely loved the GTS---in fact, aside from a couple of Springbanks and Macallans I've had, I'd say it is the best overall whisky I have ever had. I absolutely hated the 1792 and the Henry McKenna. I can see their appeal, they're not horrible, but I wouldn't drink them too often. I really love the EC12 and Knob Creek and the Maker's Mark is a fine dram. The Virginia Gentleman provoked no strong reactions one way or another, but was certainly a solid dram.

Which whiskies would you suggest I try next? And why? I'm in Baltimore, MD, btw---so if anyone can recommend great whisky shops nearby... :)

Best and thanks.

kbuzbee
07-24-2006, 16:11
Welcome to the forum!

There have been a few threads on which Bourbons might appeal most to Scotch drinker (and most people on this board have an occasional Scotch, as well). Do a search of Bourbon for Scotch drinkers and you'll find them. One of the comments often made is 'depends on what Scotch they like'. That seems logical. Myself, I like Laphroaig and Lagavulin. In Bourbon, Wlid Turkey products (Kentucky Spirit, Rare Breed, Tribute), GTS is a favorite on this board and I concur whole heartedly, Bookers is a great expression. If you like the Maker's you may like other wheated Bourbon like Weller. (Bourbons tend to use Rye or Wheat as their 'flavor grain'....

Don't forget Ryes, similar to Bourbon but >51% Rye instead of > 51% corn in the mash. There are a few really great older Ryes out there from Sazerac, Van Winkle and such and my personal favorite, Wild Turkey Rye.

Enjoy the trip and, again, welcome!!

Ken

thehighking
07-25-2006, 07:20
Thanks for the reply.

I tend to like a variety of Scotches, from the peatier things you mentioned (have you tried Ardbeg?) to milder Lowlanders like Rosebank to really sherried whiskies like Macallan to more restrained things like Glenlivet.

But that's a different discussion. :)

I liked Gentleman Jack and that is a rye, so that may not be a bad idea, too...

T47
07-25-2006, 08:00
If you like the rye flavor, one Bourbon I really enjoy is Old Grand Dad 114. Reasonably priced and great flavor with lots of Rye.

kbuzbee
07-25-2006, 08:06
have you tried Ardbeg?

I liked Gentleman Jack and that is a rye, so that may not be a bad idea, too...

I've looked for Ardbeg but not found it around here. Lots of high recs for it. Definately on my "want to try" list.

All Jacks are Tenn. Whiskeys, not Bourbon or Rye (technically). It has to do with the way they filter it through the charcoal. I'm fairly sure that Gentleman Jack is a standard corn based mash, though, and not a Rye based mash. Wild Turkey Rye should be available to you. It's will give you a great concept of the Rye flavor. Then you can try some of the older expressions to see if, in your opinion, the added time in wood compliments or hides the Rye character.

Ken

jimibourbonhammered
07-25-2006, 08:34
I, too, have expanded from Single Malt Scotch into Bourbon territory as well and if you like GTS (who doesn't?), then you will like Booker's. Old Rip Van Winkle 15yo is really nice. Next on my shopping list that are well received here are: Wild Turkey Rare Breed, Rock Hill Farm Single Cask, Pappy Van Winkle Family Reserve 20 Years Old, and maybe Evan Williams Single Barrel. Lots of knowledgable persons here to learn from, I've been a lurker for awhile.

thehighking
07-25-2006, 08:42
I've looked for Ardbeg but not found it around here. Lots of high recs for it. Definately on my "want to try" list.

All Jacks are Tenn. Whiskeys, not Bourbon or Rye (technically). It has to do with the way they filter it through the charcoal. I'm fairly sure that Gentleman Jack is a standard corn based mash, though, and not a Rye based mash. Wild Turkey Rye should be available to you. It's will give you a great concept of the Rye flavor. Then you can try some of the older expressions to see if, in your opinion, the added time in wood compliments or hides the Rye character.

Ken

Hmmm...I don't know why I always assumed that JD was Rye---which is sort of silly now that I think about it, 'cuz most of the rye is up North, no?

WT may be a good next purchase.

Since we all seem to agree on GTS---what other products does BT make and how do they compare? (Sorry if there's already a thread for this. :))

Oh, and you must track down an Ardbeg, it's my favorite out of all of the Islay whiskies. Is Ohio a state to which alcohol can be shipped?

kbuzbee
07-25-2006, 09:12
Rye began in places like Maryland and PA but most is now produced in Kentucky.

Pretty much all BT products are in the range of very good to amazing (eg. - GTS!) The namesake bourbon, Buffalo Trace is one of my favorites and very reasonably priced. Sadly ALSO unavailable in Ohio..... All the Antique collection are good to great (GTS, Weller, Sazerac 18 and Eagle Rare 17), Blanton's and Elmer T. Lee are theirs as well. They have a good website you should check out that even has cameras (one on a bottling line folks here seem to watch closely :grin:

Yes, Ohio does allow shipment. I'll do that occasionally. It may come to that if it doesn't cross my path... Thanks for the rec.

Ken

chasking
07-25-2006, 09:27
I must specifically recommend Elmer T. Lee, mentioned above. A big favorite of many, including me. It was Bourbon of the Month a while ago; check out some of the comments in that thread.

In fact, you couldn't go too far wrong working your way through the Bourbons of the Month that you haven't tried yet.

barturtle
07-25-2006, 09:34
For what it's worth here, since you like Stagg, it has been stated that Stagg, Eagle Rare, Buffalo Trace and Old Charter are all the same mashbill. You might want to work your way through these(if available to you) as they share a common thread, yet due to barrel selection, proof, age and such represent the range that one mashbill can be taylored to.

Ambernecter
07-25-2006, 10:11
You've had a fairly wide and differing range of whiskey thus far. You cannot lose by trying anything from Wild Turkey or Van Winkle. WT 101 is a very good price for a good solid pour and VW 10YO 107 (if you can get it where you are) is absolutely top notch stuff.

The WT rye was recommended earlier but I would also say to give the VW 13YO rye a bash as well - it's simply superb.

hollywood
07-25-2006, 12:56
As you can see, their are many fantastic bourbons/opinions on what to buy next. To me, that will be the fun part for you, trying different pours and finding what excites your palate. A few more are Jefferson Reserve, Rock Hill Farms (could be tough to find?!), EWSB, and Woodford Reserve to name a few. Happy Hunting, H'wood

BobA
07-25-2006, 12:59
I think you should try to find out if you like a rye-heavy taste, and I don't get much of that in anything you've tried (MM and VG are wheaters). I would second the recommendation of Old Grand Dad 114, and it is interesting to compare the effect of its proof to that of Stagg (Booker's too, if you want to pick it up), and some lower proofs. Or pick up whatever rye whiskey you can find; WT is pretty common. Sazerac is not that common, but worth finding.

And I'll also second the notion that anything Van Winkle is excellent, and WT products are also worth having.

Bob

jspero
07-26-2006, 11:16
I'm in Baltimore, MD, btw---so if anyone can recommend great whisky shops nearby... :)

Best and thanks.

I recommend 2 places:

1. Cranberry Liquors in Westminster - They have a good selection of higher-end bourbons (and they are my home-town store).
2. Montgomery County county-run stores. I go to the one in Burtonsville at the corner of 29 and 198. The manager there knows bourbon and keeps a good stock. Montgomery County stores have the lowest prices in the area and run GREAT sales. All of the low prices I list in my other posts are from this store.

Where in B'more are you located? I live in Westminster and work in Greenbelt.

Jay

thehighking
07-26-2006, 13:26
I recommend 2 places:

1. Cranberry Liquors in Westminster - They have a good selection of higher-end bourbons (and they are my home-town store).
2. Montgomery County county-run stores. I go to the one in Burtonsville at the corner of 29 and 198. The manager there knows bourbon and keeps a good stock. Montgomery County stores have the lowest prices in the area and run GREAT sales. All of the low prices I list in my other posts are from this store.

Where in B'more are you located? I live in Westminster and work in Greenbelt.

Jay

Thanks for the tips, Jay! I live in Pikesville (yes, the birthplace of Pikesville Rye), which is about 15 minutes from Baltimore proper.

I generally go to Well's Liquor in Towson or to the Wine Source in Hamden. The former has a great whisky selection, but mostly when it comes to Scotches (although they have a sizable selection of American whiskies, too.) The latter has a fantastic American, Scotch, and Irish whisky selection (e.g. carries GTS, Sazerac, etc.) Both, of course, have their shortcomings (as far as selection and prices), so I'm always on the lookout for others stores. The MoCo store you mention may get a visit from me soon as I go up that way pretty frequently. The Westminster one will too, but it may have to wait awhile.