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tmas
08-19-2006, 22:41
I probably should know this after all the time I've spent enjoying this website, but I don't! So, pardon my ignorance but I was wondering if anyone could enlighten me on this point: Some Bourbons are wheaters such as the Van Winkle bourbons & Wellers, if a bourbon is not a wheater does that mean that it is likely to be rye oriented?
On a more particular note, I am bringing along an ORVW 15 yr and a Jefferson Reserve 15 year on my annual fishing getaway, and I was wondering how the mashes compare. Tom V

Sijan
08-19-2006, 22:44
If it is not a wheated bourbon, then it is a rye-based bourbon.

tmas
08-19-2006, 22:52
If it is not a wheated bourbon, then it is a rye-based bourbon.

Thank you Sijan, I love simple answers, less to try to remember in my crowded brain! Armed with that knowledge, I will assume the Jefferson 15 is rye based, and that will make comparing it with the ORVW 15 more interesting. Tom V

bluesbassdad
08-19-2006, 23:52
There's a slight semantic problem in Dan's reply.

Since bourbon by law is made from a mash that contains at least 51% corn, it seems more appropriate to describe all bourbon as corn-based. However, the so-called "small grain" component, in practice either rye or wheat, does have a significant impact on the flavor, and it certainly makes sense to distinguish between the two formulas in some way.

HUMOR ALERT: You know there's something wrong in the world when an attorney gives you the simple answer and an engineer then obfuscates the matter.

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

Joeluka
08-20-2006, 06:38
If I may add the smart-ass :skep: answer. (This is directed towards Dave :rolleyes: ) If we are calling it a wheated bourbon or Rye-based bourbon, Aren't we to assume that by using the word bourbon in both these descriptions we already allow for the 51% corn??

Just a bartender's answer:bigeyes:

Sijan
08-20-2006, 12:19
Yeah, I just meant rye-based as the equivalent of "wheated." "Ryed" didn't sound right.

bluesbassdad
08-20-2006, 12:38
And "ryer", analogous to "wheater", sounds even worse, eh?

Hey, I have an idea! Let's call it "rye-based". :grin:

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

contrarian
08-20-2006, 15:35
I frequently see these referred to as "rye-recipe" bourbons. Surely "rye-based bourbon" is an oxymoron?

BobA
08-21-2006, 12:24
And then there's "high-rye," such as Old Grand Dad, and "low rye," such as Old Charter. I have no idea where the Jefferson fits in on that scale.

Now that I think of it, I have never seen a reference to a wheater as a "high-wheat" or "low-wheat" recipe.

Bob

bluesbassdad
08-21-2006, 13:00
I was just having fun in my earlier posts. Yes, I think the term "rye-recipe" is both descriptive and accurate.

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

TimmyBoston
08-22-2006, 02:31
HUMOR ALERT: You know there's something wrong in the world when an attorney gives you the simple answer and an engineer then obfuscates the matter.

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

Brilliant, Dave

TnSquire
08-24-2006, 08:42
What about 4 grain bourbons?? :rolleyes:

Bamber
08-24-2006, 09:54
reaters ....