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cowdery
09-04-2006, 22:15
I enjoy a good tequila now and then, both in margaritas and straight. Yes, straight. A good tequila can be sipped just like a fine bourbon.

It so happens that I am a fan of Herradura, specifically their reposado, so I noticed with interest the news that Brown-Forman has acquired the company, which also makes the El Jimador brand.

In another thread where this came up, WKU88 recommended Cuervo Gran Reserva. ("It may be the best tequila ever. It is expensive, though.") As well as Cuervo Traditional and Sauza Hornitos, which are reposados, and Cuervo 1800, an anejo.

So, what do you like in a tequila, either for sipping or mixing?

BourbonJoe
09-05-2006, 05:38
I personally like Cuzano Rojo Mescal. It has a butterscotch taste and goes down well straight. I never mix this stuff. One time while in the Sam's Club in Cancun, one of the natives referred to it as "rat poison". Seems Mescal is a little too strong for them. They prefer the clear tequilas.
Joe :usflag:

Ubertaster
09-05-2006, 06:19
I enjoy a good tequila now and then, both in margaritas and straight. Yes, straight. A good tequila can be sipped just like a fine bourbon.

It so happens that I am a fan of Herradura, specifically their reposado, so I noticed with interest the news that Brown-Forman has acquired the company, which also makes the El Jimador brand.

In another thread where this came up, WKU88 recommended Cuervo Gran Reserva. ("It may be the best tequila ever. It is expensive, though.") As well as Cuervo Traditional and Sauza Hornitos, which are reposados, and Cuervo 1800, an anejo.

So, what do you like in a tequila, either for sipping or mixing?

With your bourbon tastes as also in mine you should prefer an añejo. The añejos are not usually preferred for margaritas and most recommend a blanco. Lately I have been using 1800 reposado for my margaritas. The Tequila drinkers usually use what they don't want to drink neat [their mistakes] in their Margaritas. For sipping tequila I would suggest El Tesoro añejo as my first choice and Tonala 'Suprema # 4' Anejo Tequila' which you can get at Binny's. Tonala has been my favorite mid level Tequila for quite a while. I have been a Tequila drinker quite a while now and switch between that and bourbon about half and half. Whatever you decide to try make sure it is 100% agave.

bj

smokinjoe
09-05-2006, 06:22
I have 3 favorites, all for sipping: 1)Sauza Triada Anejo (Only problem is I haven't seen it for a couple of years now) 2) Cielo Reposado. Had this at our sast annual Cinco de Mayo party, and it was a huge hit. 3) Herradura Reposado (A regular at the party, since Chuck's rec a couple of years ago)

JOE

MikeK
09-05-2006, 07:56
Tequila choice depends on whether you are drinking it straight or in a Margarita. If straight, you want something aged. I prefer El Tesoro añejo. If you want to drop $100, try El Tesoro Paradiso. It is cognac barreled and very elegant. If making a drink, you want it unaged to get a full, fresh flavor. I recommend El Tesoro Platinum or Sausa Hornitos.

For a good Margarita you MUST use fresh squeezed lime juice and Cointreau.

Limes vary in sweet/tart profile with every batch. About twice a year you will get a batch of limes that are absolutely perfect. On those occations, make the Margarita with El Tesroro Paradiso (or the best aged Tequila you've got) and the result is simply spectacular.


Fill cocktail shaker 1/2 full with medium size ice cubes
Add 1 1/2 oz. freshly squeezed lime juice (about 1 lime)
Add 1 1/4 oz. El Tesoro Silver tequila
Add 3/4 oz. Cointreau
Place top on shaker and shake for 5 seconds
Pour drink into glass

Edward_call_me_Ed
09-05-2006, 08:00
I have been a Tequila drinker quite a while now and switch between that and bourbon about half and half. Whatever you decide to try make sure it is 100% agave.

bj

Is there anyway to know except to find the words, 100% Agave on the label somewhere? Are there any one hundred percenters out there that are not labled as such?

Ed

Ubertaster
09-05-2006, 08:50
Is there anyway to know except to find the words, 100% Agave on the label somewhere? Are there any one hundred percenters out there that are not labled as such?

Ed

It will always say 100% if it is. If it isn't it won't say anything. If it is not 100% it is what is called a mixto. Even mixtos have to have at least 51% Agave and the rest of the alcohol is usually made from sugar of some kind. Most of Sausa choices are mixtos and you wont find a veteran Tequila drinker drinking any Tequila from Sausa. Cuervo also has mostly mixtos but has one 100% that is very good [Cuervo Reserva de la Familia]. It is of course rather expensive at around $80. There are some excellent Tequilas in the $30 to $50 range. I have tried maybe around 125 different ones and like many different ones. There are also some dogs out there but thats what comes with experimenting with different Tequilas. Also different people have different tastes so find the ones you like. I think if you don't like El Tesoro Blanco, Reposado, or Añejo you probably wont like Tequila.

bj

cowdery
09-05-2006, 15:56
Sauza Hornitos is 100% agave, but most Sauza and Cuervo expressions are not.

A 100% agave tequila will say so on the label.

bluesbassdad
09-05-2006, 16:06
Herradura Reposado (A regular at the party, since Chuck's rec a couple of years ago)

So that's why I have a bottle of that. I was rearranging things recently and came across this bottling. I vaguely recalled buying it, perhaps in Houston a couple of years ago, but I couldn't remember why. Normally I buy tequila only to make Margaritas for guests, and I stick with whatever I can get at COSTCO.

Now that I no longer recall how much the HR cost, I think I'll put it in the regular rotation for sipping.

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

doubleblank
09-05-2006, 18:47
Chuck....I'm with you on the Herradura Reposado, as we've both posted here numerous times that its a good one. My mother doesn't drink much, but when we take her out for dinner, she has me order her a Margarita made with that "good tequila".....Herradura Reposado.

Another fave is made just north of PV....called Leyva. Aged for three months, more or less, in oak barrels. The pinas are still cooked in a outdoor dugout pit and fermented in open topped barrels. A garden hose provides the water for condensing off of the still. As simple a distillation process as I've ever seen. It can't be called tequila as its made in the state of Nayarit. Look for it if you ever make it to PV.

Randy

CrispyCritter
09-05-2006, 20:03
I'll second (or third, or fourth) the recommendation for 100% agave. A mini of Cuervo Gold turned me off of tequila - until I came across a tasting of Distinguido at my nearby Binny's. It's available in blanco, reposado, and añejo versions, all 100% agave, and all were out for tasting. A bottle of the reposado followed me home... it's very sippable neat, yet it's light enough to be good in a cocktail - which reminds me, I ought to mix a margarita or go fishing for tequila cocktail recipes on cocktaildb.com some time.

Gillman
09-05-2006, 23:04
Cuervo Gold may not be 100% agave (actually I thought it was, but maybe not) but it has an excellent house flavor. I find it a bit sweet but sometimes sweetness is wanted, e.g., after dinner with coffee.

Gary

cowdery
09-06-2006, 12:00
Gold or "oro" tequilas can only be made in the mixto class. There are no 100% agave oros. Gold tequila is not aged. Its color comes from the addition of caramel. That is also where it gets its sweetness.

Gillman
09-06-2006, 13:04
I saw today another Cuervo which said 100% agave on it. Red seal wax top, looked expensive but there was no price tag and I had to leave before I could ask. Something on it too about family reserve.

I would think in the Cuervo line it's the raddest of the rad, fashizzle. :)

Anyone try it?

Gary

Vange
09-06-2006, 13:17
Thats probably Jose Cuervo Reserva de la Familia. Did it come in a designer box? Each year they commemorate a mexican artist who designs the display box. It is in my top 5 of tequilas. It is WONDERFUL!
Anywhere from $75-$110. An excellent "bargain" tequila is El Tesoro anejo. $33-$40ish.

http://orig.app.com/goodlife/Fall2005/topshelf/tequila2.html

Gillman
09-06-2006, 13:35
Thanks, yes, it comes in a box and as you described. It was in a section of the store where the spirits are usually over $100. I'd guess (we could check at www.lcbo.com) it is going for about $150.00 (CAN).

Gary

Vange
09-07-2006, 10:30
Each year actually tastes a little different as well. I have had the 2003, 2004, 2005, and 2006. Of those, the 2004 is my favorite thus far. They go back as far as 1995.

Frodo
09-08-2006, 20:06
I tend to go for solid mid-shelfers for my tequila choices. If I bought in Ontario, and it's poor selection, I'd go for Herradurra Repo. Definatly worth the $55 cdn price tag.

When family members go to PV, they do bring back bottles for me. Some favourites of mine are Gran Centenario Anjeo, Don Edwardo Reposado, 4 Copas Blanco. Still in my early discovery phase though.

Must say I did like the Jose Cuervo de la Familia. Not at $190 cdn, but at $100 US from a duty-free it would be an easy purchase.

CrispyCritter
09-08-2006, 20:14
The other day, I went searching for tequila-based, non-Margarita cocktail recipes on CocktailDB (http://cocktaildb.com/). I ended up trying a couple of them:

the Matador (http://cocktaildb.com/recipe_detail?id=4439)
the Mexican Eagle (http://cocktaildb.com/recipe_detail?id=4449)In both cases, I used Distinguido Reposado and Noilly Prat white vermouth. For the Eagle, I used Appleton Estate golden rum, while I used Cointreau in the Matador, instead of ordinary curaçao.

I found the Matador a lot more enjoyable than the Eagle. In the Eagle, the ingredients seemed to fight one another, with the vermouth winning. The Matador, on the other hand, was a very well-integrated drink. :yum:

I later tried a "Jamaicanized" version of the Red Hook, substituting the Appleton Estate golden rum for rye whiskey. This seemed to have an intriguing, smoky edge to it that I don't find when I make it the normal way with rye - but I liked it a whole lot better than the Mexican Eagle.

TNbourbon
09-08-2006, 21:47
An 'el cheap-o' that I think is good value for the money (think, Old Heaven Hill 10yo BIB):
http://www.bevmo.com/productinfo.asp?sku=00000072814&N=168+40+4294956622&Nr=Store%3A99&Nr=Store%3A99&area=club

Edward_call_me_Ed
09-09-2006, 07:00
The other day, I went searching for tequila-based, non-Margarita cocktail recipes on CocktailDB (http://cocktaildb.com/). I ended up trying a couple of them:

Their bourbon gallery is worth a gander,

http://cocktaildb.com/ingr_gallery?id=415

Ed

Gillman
09-09-2006, 12:32
Based on Chuck's posts I picked up a Herradura Reposado. It is very good and worth the money (considering, that is, the high price of 100% blue agave tequila).

It has a winy good quality blanco base but the short aging softens and improves it. At the same time, the blanco roots are not hidden.

There is a natural oak sweetness which is appealing and possibly a faint whiskey influence from the use (probably) of ex-bourbon barrels.

This is a full-flavoured yet refined drink. I can see how tequila fans regard these as world classics even though I'm still coming to terms with the Gothic taste of cactus-derived spirit.

I tasted it next to one of my (yes folks) tequila blends. The one I chose is part Sauza Gold, part Cuervo Gold, and part Agava Silver (the South African tequila-type drink). Before doing the comparison I added to about 22 ounces of my blend one ounce of the Herradura, because, well why not?

My blend is not as good as the Herradura but it isn't bad by any means, oh no. I used an interesting marrying agent too for my blend. I had put in very little (one ounce maximum) of a neutral alcohol-based red spicy sweet drink which was a recent recreation of a faux-1800's whiskey that Mike Veach gave me. It added a touch of sweetness, faint spice and in general a pleasant overlay to the heavy agave flavours in there. It is a fine drink and would make a great Margarita but for neat sampling I have to give the nod to the Herradura.

While I am on the subject of non-bourbon, I also tried a Napoleon XO St-Remy. This is the brandy, not Remy Martin cognac. Just for fun I thought I would see what a top-line brandy (but non-cognac again) brandy tastes like. It is very good. Better I thought than Spanish brandy but with more fruit and sweetness than the cognacs I've had. It has a deep brandyish taste, with notes of cocoa, fruit and oak. Good integration with a soft lingering finish. This costs $23.00 against 8 and 10 times that for the cognac XOs: I think it holds up very well.

Finally, I sampled one of my ostensibly outlandish blends. This is 1/4 18 year old Canadian brandy; 1/4 rich Spanish brandy; and 1/2 of a well-integrated but kind of bland combination of North American whiskies. I got the idea from Byrn writing in the 1870's who advised to add a raisiny spirit to rye distillate. All my whiskey blends are heavy on the rye so I thought why not add a fruity brandy? I added more though than he advised. He said to add up to 10% raisin spirit and I went much higher but it didn't hurt the whiskey, au contraire. Well, this is really good! The fruit from the brandies informs and deepens the whiskey tastes. It is seamless and good and if anyone had it they might have trouble saying what it is exactly but they could not fail to like it. It too may hit Gazebo table soon.

Gary

Joeluka
09-09-2006, 12:37
Their bourbon gallery is worth a gander,

http://cocktaildb.com/ingr_gallery?id=415

Ed

Thats where I found the picture of the Van Winkle Lot A. Great site for cocktails and research into everything Liquor.

Edward_call_me_Ed
09-10-2006, 23:24
Tequila choice depends on whether you are drinking it straight or in a Margarita. If straight, you want something aged. I prefer El Tesoro añejo. If you want to drop $100, try El Tesoro Paradiso. It is cognac barreled and very elegant. If making a drink, you want it unaged to get a full, fresh flavor. I recommend El Tesoro Platinum or Sausa Hornitos.

For a good Margarita you MUST use fresh squeezed lime juice and Cointreau.

Limes vary in sweet/tart profile with every batch. About twice a year you will get a batch of limes that are absolutely perfect. On those occations, make the Margarita with El Tesroro Paradiso (or the best aged Tequila you've got) and the result is simply spectacular.


Fill cocktail shaker 1/2 full with medium size ice cubes
Add 1 1/2 oz. freshly squeezed lime juice (about 1 lime)
Add 1 1/4 oz. El Tesoro Silver tequila
Add 3/4 oz. Cointreau
Place top on shaker and shake for 5 seconds
Pour drink into glass

I have a question about the El Tesoro tequilas. I saw three of them on the shelf today, the silver, platinum, and one other, I don't recall which. The sliver was a couple of bucks more than the platinum. What is the difference and which do you prefer?

I know that fresh limes are a must, but I don't use them. They are just too expensive here in Japan. I do have a trick to make bottled lime juice more acceptable. I add a few drops of lemon extract to the drink. If I remember in time I pour a bit in the shot glass and pour it back in the bottle. This gives the finished drink a bit of citrus peel flavor that would otherwise be missing.
Ed

Edward_call_me_Ed
09-10-2006, 23:37
It will always say 100% if it is. If it isn't it won't say anything. If it is not 100% it is what is called a mixto. Even mixtos have to have at least 51% Agave and the rest of the alcohol is usually made from sugar of some kind. Most of Sausa choices are mixtos and you wont find a veteran Tequila drinker drinking any Tequila from Sausa. Cuervo also has mostly mixtos but has one 100% that is very good []. It is of course rather expensive at around $80. There are some excellent Tequilas in the $30 to $50 range. I have tried maybe around 125 different ones and like many different ones. There are also some dogs out there but thats what comes with experimenting with different Tequilas. Also different people have different tastes so find the ones you like. I think if you don't like El Tesoro Blanco, Reposado, or Añejo you probably wont like Tequila.

bj

Oh no, I like tequila. I am not widely experienced in it, that's all. There is a bottle of Cuervo Reserva de la Familia at my dad's house. I really liked that. I have had a couple of 100% agave silvers, Herradura stands out. I haven't had any that have been aged. The price puts me off. I find myself thinking, "Gee, I could get a bottle of WT 12 year old for that."
Ed

Ubertaster
09-12-2006, 06:51
The price puts me off. I find myself thinking, "Gee, I could get a bottle of WT 12 year old for that."
Ed

I too am displeased with price of Tequila. By the time it gets to me in the Midwest through all the Federal and local taxes on both sides of the border plus shipping the price is way out of line. I am lucky I live in a state where I can get spirits shipped to my door because the selection in my area is very limited. Because of the taxes and expense of crossing the border Tequila is about $20 higher per bottle than bourbon in the same quality range.

I try to keep my Tequila purchases under the $50 range. Casa Noble blanco and reposado is in this range. I have also found a couple in the $20 range [D Los Altos both blanco and añejo] that are really good. They can be bought from "The Wine and Liquor Depot" in California. If you want to spend $300 then order Herradura Seleccion Suprema. This is the best in my book and I have a bottle of it for special occasions on my bar. I only buy one of these every couple years.

When I have to decide between a George T. Stagg and a Casa Noble Blanco I get them both.

bj

iuindy2l
09-12-2006, 15:18
Limes vary in sweet/tart profile with every batch. About twice a year you will get a batch of limes that are absolutely perfect. On those occations, make the Margarita with El Tesroro Paradiso (or the best aged Tequila you've got) and the result is simply spectacular.



Using Paradiso in a Margarita is just wasting good tequila. I wouldn't think of mixing something with it.

Virus_Of_Life
09-24-2006, 13:57
So, what do you like in a tequila, either for sipping or mixing?

I really want to read this whole thread, but for now just wanted to share my recent experiences with Tequila. Seems that being bummed about not making it to the festival and the summer weather really ignited my love for tequila again.

While in Oregon I had some of my buddies Jose Cuervo Reserve de la Familia and it was SPECTACULAR! Hardly tasted like tequila and was perfect for sipping straight. It's spendy stuff at just under $80 a bottle, but I'd put it up against any scotch... Of course I don't like scotch so that is a no brainer! Honestly this is one of the few aged Tequilas I enjoy as I typically gravitate toward the Blanco (silver).

As for those I found Gran Centenario (sp) Plata to also be phenomenal, I enjoy shooting it or sipping it with a squeeze of fresh lime juice out of a bourbon glass. Wonderful!... Not too mention a really great looking bottle. In that same class are Herradura Blanco and Chaya Blanco. Strangely enough Gran C. and Herradura I believe are the only two Silver tequilas that are aged briefly, 20 and 40 days respectively I believe, and I think that slight little bit of age adds a very nice touch.

You notice I did not mention what is probably on of the most popular tequilas Patron, which I think is very overrated as is Don Julio and that one my buddy and I will argue about forever.

As for in a margarita I really think you need a Reposado with some bite to cut through the sweetness of the mixers. And as someone else mentioned I think no point in wasting a very expensive tequila for Margaritas, it just doesn't need it. Cuervo 1800 seems to work just fine for me.

I am getting thirsty, I think I'll celebrate my pending (99% sure) move to a place in Seal Beach, :grin: (I am sure Dave knows the area 12th in between PCH and Electric Ave) ~3 blocks from the beach with a bottle of Gran Centenario or whatever else Hi Time has a great deal on! :yum: :toast: :yum:

Virus_Of_Life
10-11-2006, 13:13
OK I have pretty well read all of this thread, except (Sorry Gary) some of Gillman's long post about he came up with anything good tasting that included Cuervo Gold. Again sorry Gary, I just can't go below 1800 for anything and find that gold stuff worthless even for margaritas.

Anyway I appear to be one of the few that enjoys sipping on the Silver Tequilas (Blanco and Plata). And yes Chuck sipping on a Tequila is every bit as enjoyable as sipping on a whiskey. I find my bourbon glass works well for this and I do add a squeeze of a fresh lime wedge.... Yummy!

And about Ceurvo Rezerve DL; yeah it is exceptional stuff. I can get it around here just under $80 which is spendy, but dam is it good!

wadewood
10-11-2006, 19:17
Anyway I appear to be one of the few that enjoys sipping on the Silver Tequilas (Blanco and Plata).

I'll agree with you. The 100% Agave Blanco tequilas are my favorite for both making margs and drinking neat. They still have the pepper taste that I like in a tequilla. I off to Cancun for week this Friday, so I will have some tasting practice.

scratchline
10-11-2006, 20:56
My favorite is Chinaco. I like the reposado, but they're all good. Truly a different animal from run-of-the-mill cheap tequila. To me, the reposado straight almost tastes like a cocktail, since it's got so much going on.

The New York Times did a comparative reposado tasting recently, which has some interesting comments.

Edward_call_me_Ed
10-11-2006, 22:48
snip
I just can't go below 1800 for anything and find that gold stuff worthless even for margaritas.

Anyway I appear to be one of the few that enjoys sipping on the Silver Tequilas (Blanco and Plata). And yes Chuck sipping on a Tequila is every bit as enjoyable as sipping on a whiskey. I find my bourbon glass works well for this and I do add a squeeze of a fresh lime wedge.... Yummy!

And about Ceurvo Rezerve DL; yeah it is exceptional stuff. I can get it around here just under $80 which is spendy, but dam is it good!


Herradura Silver seems to be the Tequila for me. I like it neat and in a margarita. I like its peppery taste. I like the price point too. At around 2,200 yen or just under 20 bucks US it is barely more expensive than a mixto. In fact it is cheaper than some aged mixtos.

1800 confuses me. I have seen three different 1800s, all of them were Reposado. One was 100% agave quite dark and quiet expensive, around 80 bucks. Another one was around 30 bucks, but I couldn't find 100 % agave anywhere on the label so it must have been a mixto. Then there is the bottle that I bought, Reposado, 100% agave, not very dark and around 30 bucks. Very drinkable, but I think I prefer Herradura Silver.


Ed

Vange
10-12-2006, 10:23
I concur, the 1800s are very confusing. There are definitely different grades of them though. If they say 100% blue agave obviously they are better than the mixtos, (Cuervo 1800 gold, etc) but I still think they are lacking something.

I have tasted the 1800 Reserva anejo ($50), it's ok.
The 1800 Milenio (bottled for the millenium 6 yers ago), again, its average.
Then there is also a 1800 Coleccion. ($1000+ per bottle!) I know a few people that have tried it and they said it's DEFINITELY not worth the price.

As far as Cuervo goes, the Gran Centenario line is a Cuervo product and quite good for the price (2 of the highter end anejos are only available in Mexico).

The JCRF is the best Cuervo product IMHO.

SingleBarrel
10-12-2006, 10:58
Anyone here ever tried the recently added Cuervo Black Anejo Tequila? Amazingly smooth, aged in (you guessed it) apparenly new charred oak barrels, giving it a nice smoky taste, and also very inexpensive, especially for a true Anejo. It's not something I'd call my favorite tequila, but it is something unique. Almost too smooth for me, but it's interesting.

Vange
10-12-2006, 11:25
JC Black is a mixto. The genius Cuervo marketing labeled the bottles 100% anejo to be misleading. A tequila is either a blanco, reposado, or anejo. No variation like 20% blanco and 80% anejo exists. So, 100% anejo is redundant. You are either aged over a year and thus an anejo, or less than a year and a reposado, or not aged at all and a blanco. 100% blue agave is the key.

Virus_Of_Life
10-12-2006, 13:32
Herradura Silver seems to be the Tequila for me. I like it neat and in a margarita. I like its peppery taste. I like the price point too. At around 2,200 yen or just under 20 bucks US it is barely more expensive than a mixto. In fact it is cheaper than some aged mixtos.

1800 confuses me. I have seen three different 1800s, all of them were Reposado. One was 100% agave quite dark and quiet expensive, around 80 bucks. Another one was around 30 bucks, but I couldn't find 100 % agave anywhere on the label so it must have been a mixto. Then there is the bottle that I bought, Reposado, 100% agave, not very dark and around 30 bucks. Very drinkable, but I think I prefer Herradura Silver.


Ed

:bigeyes: You can get Herrdura Silver for under $20 Ed??!?!?!?! Holy Crap that is a damn good deal! I picked up and since finished a bottle a while back for $29.99 on sale and that was the best I have EVER seen... I'd never run out of it at that price.

Anyway, I don't put it in a margarita though, I enjoy it straight too much to do that. Interesting that around here 1800 is the cheaper of the two where there it is the Herradura.

CrispyCritter
10-12-2006, 20:48
I've never tried Cuervo Black, but more than once I've seen it in the whiskey aisle, and not among the tequilas. I'm wondering if this is on purpose.

FWIW, I've loved the Distinguido 100% agave reposado that I have on my shelf. The silver and añejo versions that I tasted were also quite good, but I felt that the reposado was the most versatile of the three.

gr8erdane
10-14-2006, 02:02
Gran Centenario is made by Cuervo? Say it ain't so! No really, PLEASE, say it ain't so.....

Vange
10-14-2006, 06:17
GC is made by Cuervo. Cuervo has a long and rich history, it's just the mass production of the swill they produce that gives tequila and name and Cuervo a bad name. If you try JC Reserva de la Familia you'll have a new found respect for Cuervo. Also, the GC lin of tequilas are good as well. They DO know how to make tequila, but they are brilliant marketers and JC mixto can be found in every bar in America.

Frodo
10-14-2006, 15:56
I agree with Evangelos. I've had the JCRF and it's REALLY good. The Gran Centenario Anjeo I've had, and it's one of those "bang for the buck" tequilas at prices inside Mexico. Nothing like the regular Cuervo swill...

wku88
11-22-2006, 22:25
JC Gran Reserva de la Familia is the shiznit... just as I told Chuck, and therefore the impetus for this thread. Can't complain about 1800 anejo either... although, I really prefer a Reposado, 100% aguave.

You learn a lot when you drink tequila in Mexico with Mexicans!

Shots of tequila flavored NGS is for the college kids.:cool:

mythrenegade
11-23-2006, 08:35
Partida Anejo. The problem is (a) it's expensive and (b) it's very hard to find. But if you can find it, and if you are up for spending north of $50 for a bottle of tequila, you will discover that it's totally worth it. Best tequila I've ever had.

Joel