PDA

View Full Version : Fall Scotches



TimmyBoston
10-26-2006, 05:11
Now that the weather's getting colder, I'm making my annual transition into more Scotch drinking. I have bottles of HP 12, Lagavulin, Ardbeg Uigaedail, Laphroig, and Talisker.

Any suggestions for some fall sipping?

TNbourbon
10-26-2006, 15:59
Aberlour A'Bunadh -- cask strength, and looks like bourbon!

DrinkyBanjo
10-26-2006, 16:41
If you ask me anything from Islay, hopefully cask strength!

CrispyCritter
10-26-2006, 17:25
Any of the above would be good choices (including the A'Bunadh), IMO.

TimmyBoston
10-26-2006, 22:54
I'm a big fan of Islays, absolutely love them, and I have quite a few of them, actually the majority of my collection is Islays, but I'm looking for something new this year. I think I may have to look into the Aberlour.

Great Suggestions, Keep 'em Coming!

CrispyCritter
12-06-2006, 20:56
Lately, I've been pouring from "forgotten" bottles that I've opened in the last year and haven't revisited. Tonight, I brought out my nearly-full Aberlour A'Bunadh Batch #15 (59.6% ABV), and wow, it's just fantastic. It's pretty obvious that I set this one aside in the first place in order to conserve it!

When I nose it, it gives me a raisiny impression, more like an Armagnac than a whisky. On the palate, the malt asserts itself, but the sherry influence is quite strong. I couldn't detect any peat (and Speysiders generally have little or no peat to speak of).

If you enjoy barrel-proof bourbons like Stagg, this is a Scotch well worth looking into.

CrispyCritter
12-08-2006, 21:26
I just poured from another one of my "forgotten" open bottles. This time, it's Compass Box Asyla, a blended Scotch (malt + grain whisky).

I've often heard of it referred to as a summer pour, but I'd say it's suitable for all seasons. It's roughly in the JW Black price bracket, but its profile reminds me of the late, lamented Campbeltown Loch 25; smoky yet sweet, with a vanilla tinge and a "toasty" nose. The malt portion of the blend makes itself known, while the grain whisky provides a lovely counterpoint.

They may not get the respect that single malts get, but well-crafted blended Scotches are highly enjoyable nonetheless - and I'll give John Glaser bonus points for his willingness to push the envelope (cf. the Spice Tree controversy (http://www.thescotchblog.com/2006/07/the_spice_tree_.html)).

TNbourbon
12-08-2006, 21:31
Plucked another A'Bunadh tonight -- Batch #9. I have #8 and #16 open (current on shelves is #17). I think I'll save this one for a multi-national whisk(e)y lineup I'm mulling for the Sampler next spring.

T47
12-21-2006, 01:15
Tonight I decided to step out of my normal zone and I purchased a bottle of Aberlour A'Bunadh (batch #16). My father in law is a Scotch drinker so I thought it might be nice to have a bottle for him to try (he has not had this one).
As someone mentioned in the favorite bottle thread, I like this one as well. It has a clean classic look.
I love the color of this, it is enticing, deep dark and rich looking.
The Sherry really overpowers my nose, with a hint of the smokiness to come as well.
The Sherry really comes through in the taste as well, along with a nice touch of smokiness and fruit. It is very smooth and creamy.
The finish has a slight bitterness to it, but then fades to leave the taste of fruit (for me something like ripe plums).
I very much enjoy the flavor, but my taste buds lean to the Bourbons and Irish more. This will be a great pour to have around for a change of pace. Seems the exploration will never end.

:toast:

T47
02-06-2007, 00:25
We brought dinner over to the in-laws and I brought along my bottle of Aberlour A'bunadh for him to try. Well he wants to know how I discovered this little jewel. I of course gave SB.com all the credit...which did confuse him slightly. Nice bottle of Aberlour A'bunadh $60...making the father-in-law happy, priceless!

:toast:

heatmiser
02-06-2007, 09:51
Aberlour A'bunadh = Yummy

This is my favorite sherried scotch!!! Great choice!!!

Pharaoh
02-25-2007, 09:57
Now that the weather's getting colder, I'm making my annual transition into more Scotch drinking. I have bottles of HP 12, Lagavulin, Ardbeg Uigaedail, Laphroig, and Talisker.

Any suggestions for some fall sipping?Not sure about specifically "fall sipping" (although generally speaking I personally tend to prefer Islay whisky on colder, uglier days).

The current released Caol Ila 25CS is great. I recently found Arigih Nam Beist, and thought it was different, but a great addition to Ardbeg's line-up. You also can't go wrong with Talisker's 175th or the current Distiller's Edition, (imho).

T47
07-21-2007, 16:30
I finally was able to replace my Aberlour A'Bunadh. I "really" enjoy the flavor of this. I went shopping today specificaly for the A'Bunadh, but also hoping to find a Bourbon to peak my interest. All of the Bourbons were bottles I currently have or was not moved enough to buy today. I did end up with a bottle of Aberlour 12 year old Double cask matured to go with the A'Bunadh. Can anyone tell me why the 12 year old would be a few dollars less than the 10 year old? I found that interesting? Anyway, I look forward to giving it a try later tonight.

Yellowjacket
07-21-2007, 17:36
TimmyBoston – I see you listed Ardbeg Uigeadail, which I think is excellent. If you have quite a few Islays then you probably already tried these: Laphroaig 10yo Cask Strength or Laphroaig Quarter Cask. Both of these are very good (I really like the QC). Also try a Bowmore 17 yo. Now a whisky that I really love is the Talisker 18 yo; I don’t know about where you are but here the Talisker 18 is only $5 more than the 10 yo, well worth the cost. For not so peaty, try Glenfarclas, Glenmorangie, or Balvenie.

T47 – I really love the A’bunadh also. Some others to try from the same genre (Sherry Monsters) are the Macallan Cask Strength and the Glenfarclas 105. You might try the Aberlour 15 or 16 (the 16 is replacing the 15). I personally think the older Aberlours are a little better than the younger ones.

Regards - Bob

T47
07-23-2007, 09:35
T47 – I really love the A’bunadh also. Some others to try from the same genre (Sherry Monsters) are the Macallan Cask Strength and the Glenfarclas 105. You might try the Aberlour 15 or 16 (the 16 is replacing the 15). I personally think the older Aberlours are a little better than the younger ones. Regards - Bob

Thanks for the information Bob. Here in WA we have the A'bunadh ($60.45), the Aberlour 10 ($31.95), Aberlour 12-double cask ($28.60) and Aberlour Glenlivet 16 ($51.00).
I was very pleased the the 12, and found it to be similiar but not as deep in flavor as the A'bunadh, but at 1/2 the price an excellent alternative.
I have only had a few Scotches and am not really familiar with the regions and how that affects the flavor. I have tried one expample of a "peaty" Scotch and did not like that flavor at all. I have had Macallan 18, Glenlivet 12, Glenmorangie 10, A'bunadh, Aberlour 10, and Aberlour 12 dbl cask.
Though Bourbon remains my favorite, I have enjoyed these Scotches as well and it's nice to have variety on the shelf.

Yellowjacket
07-23-2007, 18:48
T47 - The prices you listed are very reasonable, at least compared to around here, and I find that we usually have good prices compared to most others. Congratulations! One to try that's good and usually very reasonably priced is the Dalmore 12. You might also try a Balvenie 12 DoubleWood.

Bob

Khari
07-24-2007, 20:35
Please forgive me as I'm jumping into this one rather late. I agree wholeheartedly with Yellowjacket on both the Dalmore 12 and Balvenie Doublewood. I brought a bottle of the Balvenie to a party this weekend. It didn't last long. The Dalmore is (for me) a really enjoyable pour at a most reasonable price.

TNbourbon
07-24-2007, 21:06
I have The Dalmore in reserve (and have tasted the 62yo -- run a search!). I'm a bourbon drinker. 'Nuff said.

Jake_Parrott
08-27-2007, 19:10
Malt Trust Rosebank 15yo...58.4%abv (dash of water). From a dormant Lowland distillery. This is unbelievably complex, with rose, orange blossom, golden raspberry, honey, and vanilla over a firm malt and dry-spice backbone. There are bottles of this (Malt Trust is the bottler, Rosebank the distiller) available at Astor in New York. $109.99 a bottle, and worth every penny. A genre-defining Scotch, from one of my two favorite distilleries. And to think, Diageo chose crap-ass Glenkinchie over this place. Fie, fie on Diageo.

[Moderator is permitted to replace 'fie' with a much more appropriate 'f' word.]

TBoner
10-14-2007, 14:00
I'll throw in Glen Garioch in its younger expressions (8 or 10 yo) as my recent finds in terms of autumn Scotch. If you luck into one of the more heavily peat reeked bottles, you're in business. If not, you still have a sturdy, warming malt at a good price.

DrinkyBanjo
10-15-2007, 06:18
It's finally fall again in the North East so I went for a few scotches last weekend. Ardbeg Uigeadail and Lagavulin 12 CS. Both were very enjoyable.

Yellowjacket
10-15-2007, 17:21
This past Friday, 14 friends came over for a Scotch tasting (our fourth). We sampled:

Bunnahabhain 12 yo
Bunnahabhain 18 yo
Macallan 12 yo
Macallan 18 yo (1989)
Macallan 18 yo (1980)
Bowmore 12 yo
Bowmore 17 yo
Redbreast 12 yo (a sort of night-cap)

We had a great time and even commented that this was a great start to fall. We just wished the weather would get a bit cooler.

Bob

drrich1965
10-16-2007, 18:03
This past Friday, 14 friends came over for a Scotch tasting (our fourth). We sampled:

Bunnahabhain 12 yo
Bunnahabhain 18 yo
Macallan 12 yo
Macallan 18 yo (1989)
Macallan 18 yo (1980)
Bowmore 12 yo
Bowmore 17 yo
Redbreast 12 yo (a sort of night-cap)

We had a great time and even commented that this was a great start to fall. We just wished the weather would get a bit cooler.

Bob

A very nice group (save for the Mac 12, which I don't think has been good for years). Bowmore 17 is a classic, and replaced, sadly, by the more sherried 18 (which I hear is still good). The 17 will only be in travel (duty free), so buy it now if you like it..

I am going to finish off a sample of the Laphroaig 10 Cask strenght, the 57.3% version. A wonderful dram, good balance between the peat and the sweet malt..Less medicinal than the standard ten, and less sweet, perhaps more smokey though...

Yellowjacket
10-16-2007, 21:52
A very nice group (save for the Mac 12, which I don't think has been good for years). Bowmore 17 is a classic, and replaced, sadly, by the more sherried 18 (which I hear is still good). The 17 will only be in travel (duty free), so buy it now if you like it..

I am going to finish off a sample of the Laphroaig 10 Cask strenght, the 57.3% version. A wonderful dram, good balance between the peat and the sweet malt..Less medicinal than the standard ten, and less sweet, perhaps more smokey though...


I agree with you on the Macallan 12 - we actually tried a 12 yo of the older presentation (not sure exactly what year). Again, I agree about the Bowmore 17. I wanted the group to try the 17 yo while there was still a chance to grab one off the shelves. If you like the Laphroaig 10 CS (which I think is exellent), I hope you have tried the Laphroaig Quarter Cask, which is also excellent.

For information sake, in August we sampled the following:

Glenlivet 12 yo / 18 yoyo
Glenmorangie 10 yo / 18 yo
Bruichladdich 10 yo / 17 yo

And for December we will try:

Glenfarclas 12 yo / 17 yo
Highland Park 12 yo / 18 yo
Talisker 10 yo / 18 yo
(Also plan on introducing the group to a Highland Park 18 yo and 25 yo, both bottled in the mid-1990's)

Bob

drrich1965
10-17-2007, 20:10
I agree with you on the Macallan 12 - we actually tried a 12 yo of the older presentation (not sure exactly what year). Again, I agree about the Bowmore 17. I wanted the group to try the 17 yo while there was still a chance to grab one off the shelves. If you like the Laphroaig 10 CS (which I think is exellent), I hope you have tried the Laphroaig Quarter Cask, which is also excellent.

For information sake, in August we sampled the following:

Glenlivet 12 yo / 18 yoyo
Glenmorangie 10 yo / 18 yo
Bruichladdich 10 yo / 17 yo

And for December we will try:

Glenfarclas 12 yo / 17 yo
Highland Park 12 yo / 18 yo
Talisker 10 yo / 18 yo
(Also plan on introducing the group to a Highland Park 18 yo and 25 yo, both bottled in the mid-1990's)

Bob

I have sampled three bottles of the QC..Two were just superb, one was not as good. That one lacked the malty center that makes laphroig so balanced and special-balanced in spite of the intense peat and seaweed quality...I have had about ten expressions of Laph, including some indys..I have a bottle of the Signatory 1999 7 year old on my shelf, in the q.. I love very young Islays...however...

My favorite is the 30, which is one of the best three whiskies I have had..unbelieable..I picked up a bottle recently, as it is being replaced by the 25..they were making some great malts in the 70s there. In fact, Binnys still has the Bicentenary version 1977 malt for 120, a great price...

Nice december tasting, and lucky them for the two older expressions of HP

Yellowjacket
10-17-2007, 22:11
I have sampled three bottles of the QC..Two were just superb, one was not as good. That one lacked the malty center that makes laphroig so balanced and special-balanced in spite of the intense peat and seaweed quality...I have had about ten expressions of Laph, including some indys..I have a bottle of the Signatory 1999 7 year old on my shelf, in the q.. I love very young Islays...however...

My favorite is the 30, which is one of the best three whiskies I have had..unbelieable..I picked up a bottle recently, as it is being replaced by the 25..they were making some great malts in the 70s there. In fact, Binnys still has the Bicentenary version 1977 malt for 120, a great price...

Nice december tasting, and lucky them for the two older expressions of HP

drrich,
By the way, good to see you here from the Whisky Mag forum (though I believe you’re at PeatFreak’s now). I have seriously been into single malts about 18-20 months now and have experienced the basic Laphroaig’s, the 10, 15, CS, and QC, and have really enjoyed each of them. Due to fortunate circumstances, I will be attending the Whisky Fest in NYC in two weeks and you have confirmed my desire to sample the Laph 30 at the charity table.

As for the older HP bottlings, I have found certain areas and stores that carry a number of older dusty bottles of scotch. For instance, I found an older bottling of Laphroaig 15 yo, 45% ABV, that comes in a metal square container, with no bar code or surgeon general’s warning on the bottle, and has a “15 Years Old” label on the shoulder. I believe it comes from the very early ‘90s, but I’m not certain. I haven’t tried it yet, waiting for the right moment and will compare to the current 15.

Thanks - Bob

drrich1965
10-18-2007, 06:31
drrich,
By the way, good to see you here from the Whisky Mag forum (though I believe you’re at PeatFreak’s now). I have seriously been into single malts about 18-20 months now and have experienced the basic Laphroaig’s, the 10, 15, CS, and QC, and have really enjoyed each of them. Due to fortunate circumstances, I will be attending the Whisky Fest in NYC in two weeks and you have confirmed my desire to sample the Laph 30 at the charity table.

As for the older HP bottlings, I have found certain areas and stores that carry a number of older dusty bottles of scotch. For instance, I found an older bottling of Laphroaig 15 yo, 45% ABV, that comes in a metal square container, with no bar code or surgeon general’s warning on the bottle, and has a “15 Years Old” label on the shoulder. I believe it comes from the very early ‘90s, but I’m not certain. I haven’t tried it yet, waiting for the right moment and will compare to the current 15.

Thanks - Bob

Hi Bob,

Yes, to paraphrase a letter from the Malt Advocate, I find whisky mag, and its forum, to be too tight with the industry, to be kind...I love head to heads with old and current editions of the same malt, so that will be a great comparison..I wished I lived in a place with dusty old bottles- ABC stores here are pretty generic..some good stores across the SC border, but not that look whats in the corner quality to the places...

Given that you like Laphs so much, I would check out Binnys single cask bottles (they ship to Texas, right?)..There is one on sale for 45 bucks, cask strenght..IT is the 2000/2007.I have not had it, but had the one the year before..not complex, but very bright, malty, with some really in your face peat....

Enjoy whiskyfest..I have been into Malt for about 4 or 5 years, and have yet to make it to a big festival- only tastings. Most of my whisky interactions are between me and traiding partners...

And, no learning the world of bourbon..enjoying my discoveries, and REALLy likeing the prices..

Rich

Yellowjacket
10-18-2007, 16:54
Hi Bob,

Yes, to paraphrase a letter from the Malt Advocate, I find whisky mag, and its forum, to be too tight with the industry, to be kind...I love head to heads with old and current editions of the same malt, so that will be a great comparison..I wished I lived in a place with dusty old bottles- ABC stores here are pretty generic..some good stores across the SC border, but not that look whats in the corner quality to the places...

Given that you like Laphs so much, I would check out Binnys single cask bottles (they ship to Texas, right?)..There is one on sale for 45 bucks, cask strenght..IT is the 2000/2007.I have not had it, but had the one the year before..not complex, but very bright, malty, with some really in your face peat....

Enjoy whiskyfest..I have been into Malt for about 4 or 5 years, and have yet to make it to a big festival- only tastings. Most of my whisky interactions are between me and traiding partners...

And, no learning the world of bourbon..enjoying my discoveries, and REALLy likeing the prices..

Rich

Rich,
I have only shipped from Parker Whisky in Banff, Scotland (there's a story, but told another time). But your several suggestions on this forum about bottles from Binny's look very attractive - I'll have to check it out.

I know what you mean about bourbon. I've really begun exploring bourbons and ryes about six months now, and have discovered a great new world. I'm still learning every day (just like single malts), but a lot of fun and enjoyable. And you're right, the prices are very nice!

Bob

polyamnesia
10-27-2007, 20:27
here in PA, there are some Islay single malts going for under $25 (on sale). can't remember the name. not top shelf (literally....of course:rolleyes: ).

same brand offered a lowlands bottle as well if that helps...

are there some 'bad' or worthless Islays out there? it's a small area of the world, right? i would think bad quality scotch would be harder to dole out when you have locals and neighbors all around!

TBoner
10-27-2007, 23:31
The brand you're speaking of is probably McClelland's. If so, they are part of Morrison-Bowmore, and so their Islay is Bowmore at 5 years old, give or take. I've read mixed reviews, with most folks on the positive side but the negative reviews being overwhelmingly angry. It seems when you get a bad bottle, it's really bad. Regardless, a young Islay (including that one) can be a beautiful thing: peaty and untamed, a bit like a young rye (not flavor-wise, but in its character).

Sure, there are bad Islays (and bad Scotches generally): a bad cask is a bad cask. But by and large, even the younger expressions offer enough personality to be worth trying.

That said, I'll try any Islay. Especially for ~$20 (like McClelland's).

drrich1965
11-03-2007, 12:34
The brand you're speaking of is probably McClelland's. If so, they are part of Morrison-Bowmore, and so their Islay is Bowmore at 5 years old, give or take. I've read mixed reviews, with most folks on the positive side but the negative reviews being overwhelmingly angry. It seems when you get a bad bottle, it's really bad. Regardless, a young Islay (including that one) can be a beautiful thing: peaty and untamed, a bit like a young rye (not flavor-wise, but in its character).

Sure, there are bad Islays (and bad Scotches generally): a bad cask is a bad cask. But by and large, even the younger expressions offer enough personality to be worth trying.

That said, I'll try any Islay. Especially for ~$20 (like McClelland's).

Very solid advice all the way through here. I have had the McClelland's twice. The last time, a year ago, it was extremly metallic, and nearly undrinkable. The first bottle I had of this, which as stated is usually a 5yo Bowmore, it was decent. For young Islays, I far prefer Caol Ila. Bowmore seems to like a bit more time, but the Bowmore Legend is not bad at all, and usually under $30. Binny's as some single cask Caol Ila and Bowmores in the 6 and 7 year range- the ones I have had have been very good, and in the mid 40s.