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Gillman
10-29-2006, 17:51
I'd like some information.

I am assuming this dish goes well with bourbon and that this justifies its inclusion in this section of the forum. (How could chili NOT go well with bourbon?).

My query is prompted by the Cincinnati chapter in Calvin Trillin's classic American Fried, a circa-1970 gambol down the byways and highways of American regional cooking, mostly of the fast food or communal eating category.

In the book he lauds Cincinnati chili. He says it was popularised in the 1920's and is typically served by Greek-American restaurateurs. He says "a bowl of plain" is chili on spaghetti. If you want it "three ways", cheese is added. Four ways is with onions. Five is with beans, son. He says Cincinnatans stop there but he was told of establishments in Covington, KY (across the river) that make a 6- and 7-way version, adding things like eggs and franks.

He said each neighborhood has a chili parlour and each one is the best!

My questions: does this chili specialty still exist there?

If so are there still neighborhood chili joints?

Is it still called "bowl of plain" where nothing is added and three-way, four-way, etc. where other stuff is put on?

Is Covington still trying to trump the classic Cinnci version?

Finally: who makes the best chili in Cinnci?

Gary

wadewood
10-29-2006, 19:49
I was just in Cincy airport and in the terminal there was a restaurant that sold nothing but Chili, including the 5 way.

sysrick
10-29-2006, 20:43
I am not familiar with the neighborhood chili parlors and will leave that for others. There are two big chains that specialize in Cinc. Chili-- Gold Star and Skyline. Wiki offers a lot of information:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cincinnati_chili

robbyvirus
10-29-2006, 22:00
As a native Cincinnatian, and as someone who still visits there several times a year, even though I now live far away, I must answer this probing and vital inquiry. Yes, Cincinnati chili still exists, and yes, it is still awesome! But if you've never had it before, and you're yearning to try it, let me warn you - you must rid yourselves of all preconceptions as to what chili should be. Most people think of chili as a meaty, hearty thing, but Cincinnati chili is more like spaghetti sauce...thin and watery, with traces of weird ingredients like cinnamon and chocolate. This is not to say it's not good...on the contrary, it's great, but it's a world apart from what they call chili in places like Texas and New Mexico.

Cincinnati chili is typically eaten in one of two ways: on top of a small hot dog in a bun, where it's called a "coney" (or a "chili sandwich" if you leave out the hot dog), or on top of spaghetti, and this is where the nomenclature comes in. The typical way of eating Cincinnati chili is the "three way". This is chili on top of spaghetti, topped with cheese. And if it's classic Cincinnati chili, the cheese is Velveeta, or something close to it. A four-way is a three way with either beans or onions added (you need to specify which, as in "I'll take a four-way with beans...and an Alka Seltzer"), and a five-way is chili, spaghetti, cheese, onions, and beans. The five way is an awesome meal, but I wouldn't recommend it right before a big date. And a "bowl of plain" is just that, a bowl of the chili alone, no spaghetti, no nothing, just a soupy bowl of chili. It's good, but it's rare for people to order that. As I said the chili is thin, like a soup, so it's best enjoyed when it's ladeled onto something, like spaghetti or a hot dog and bun.

As for chili parlors, there are two big chili chains in Cincinnati: Skyline Chili and Gold Star Chili. Both have their fans, but I am very partial to Skyline. There is a smaller chain called Empress Chili, which is also good. As for neighborhood chili parlors, yes, there used to be lots of them, but like so many other mom-and-pop businesses in this era of WalMart, many have disappeared. Still, the few that remain are well worth searching out.

And as for Cincinnati chili being good with bourbon, well, I tend to think not. It's a heavy, spicy meal, and while delicious, a beer is probably more appropriate. Sorry. But as one of the few remaining truly unique local cuisines in this country, I must say that if you're ever in Cincinnati, it's well worth searching out the nearest Skyline and ordering that five-way! You won't regret it...at least for an hour.

Gillman
10-30-2006, 03:41
Excellent, many thanks!

All other opinions received with interest.

Has Covington given up its claims in the matter of chili a la Cinncinati..?

Gary

Joeluka
10-30-2006, 07:04
Gary, Look who has a page on the Cinncy Chili,

http://www.ellenjaye.com/worldcafe/04_chilicinc.htm

Gillman
10-30-2006, 07:21
Thanks Joe, I had no idea his pages covered this.

The person who introduced chili in the city in the 1920's is named in Trillin's book - I can't recall the exact spelling but Trillin says he was from Macedonia.

The use of cinammon, allspice and chocolate as seasonings is interesting. I wouldn't discount a Mexican origin since chocolate is used as a seasoning in some dishes there (notably mole sauce for poultry) - and famously is of new world origin. I am not sure about cinammon and allspice but these may well have been brought by Spaniards to Mexico. In the 1500's and 1600's the use of these spices was widespread in parts of Europe as a holdover from medieval cookery. E.g. the Quebec "tourtiere", a ground meat pie with a topping of flaky pastry, uses cinammon and allspice and similar flavourings (nutmeg, etc.) and surely dates back to the 1600's. Although, these spices are also characteristic of some Greek cuisines, no question.

Probably the dish was an amalgam of influences, in typical American fashion...

Gary

NeoTexan
10-30-2006, 07:47
I can't recall the exact spelling but Trillin says he was from Macedonia.

Gary

Also interesting because Macedonia is between Cleveland and Akron and last year got it's first Skyline.

Gillman
10-30-2006, 08:30
Dale, I forgot you are (now) an Ohioan!

Do you like this kind of chili, can you get it in Akron?

Gary

NeoTexan
10-30-2006, 10:41
I do have a Skyline in the area.

It is an acquired taste, which I have not obtained. I am familiar with the Mexican dishes using chocolate, etc and enjoy them, but this is different.


A co-worker, from Cincy, goes every Tuesday for lunch. He always asks if anyone else want to go, but never gets takers. I pass the shop up on the way home and although it is not very easy to get to (back some side streets), it is visible from the highway and always seems to have a crowd. Perhaps there are a great number of Cincy transplants here. Or perhaps I misjudged the taste of the locals.

PS As quoted by the Cincy guy: "The only reason Cincinnati calls it chili is because they can't spell spaghetti." :lol:

cowdery
10-30-2006, 12:12
I went to college near Cincinnati and developed my love of Cincinnati chili there. I'm surprised to hear Empress described as a "smaller chain" because it used to be second only to Skyline. Gold Star is the relative newcomer.

There is a good thread on the topic here. (http://www.lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?t=1804&highlight=cincinnati+chili)

Thirty years ago they didn't go too far from Cincinnati but today there are Skylines and Gold Stars all over Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana and perhaps other states. They're in Louisville, I know. Other places, in the Cincinnati area and elsewhere (even one here in Chicago) offer what they bill as "Cincinnati Chili," but from my experience only those three chains get it right.

The origin details are somewhat murky, as I think both Skyline and Empress, which are owned by different branches of the same family, claim to have been the first.

John and Linda's recipe for the dish is very good and authentic. I have made it many times. It is also very easy.

As for Covington trying to lay claim to some innovative variations, that is news to me, but I've never spent much time in Covington.

As mentioned above, beans are available as add-ons but the devotees rarely order them. The most common orders are the three-way or the four-way with onions. When you get it in the bowl (as opposed to a coney), you get oyster crackers. Hot sauce is usually available but also is not really part of the traditional experience.

It has always been understood that both the beans and the hot sauce are offered as a kind of concession to diners who want a more traditional Tex-Mex chili.

It's always been described as Greek and there are some similar meat sauces in Greek cuisine. I don't believe there is any Mexican connection.

Cincinnati, by the way, is a great town with a lot to recommend it. Not the least is how close it is to Kentucky.

Gillman
10-30-2006, 13:33
Excellent again, thanks - looks like people have scoped this out, in writing too!

There must be some connection to Mexico or the South West, if only in the name.

I was wrong by the way in saying Trillin called a bowl of plain, chili on spaghetti, he didn't. He did refer to chili only by that term and refers too to the oyster crackers. It was Trillin who referred to Covington restaurants as innovating with eggs and franks but maybe that trend died out since the book was written. I'll go into Covington one day and check it out. I've actually tried twice to get into Covington and ended up on the bridge, in one case, and 5 miles downriver, in another case. I don't know what I'm doing wrong. I need an SB-er who knows the area to come with me. Then too when you are trying to put some distance between your windshield and flying stones from passing trucks you can get distracted. :)

Trillin also talks about a place called Stenger's, the last he says of the old German workingman's bars in what used to be called (he used the past tense in 1970), "Over the Rhine". What did he eat there? A pile of mettwurst on two potato pancakes with sides of beets and pickles and other good stuff.

Does Stenger's still exist...?

Gary

NeoTexan
10-30-2006, 14:35
Does Stenger's still exist...?

Gary


:(
Sunday, May 02, 1999

Say so long to Stenger's




BY JIM KNIPPENBERG
The Cincinnati Enquirer

This looks to be the end of an era: After 52 years at the stove, Leo Sunderman is cooling his burners.
Sunderman owns Stenger's, the Vine Street cafe in Over-the-Rhine that's famous for its blue-plate specials and its eclectic clientele. It may be the only place in town where a tableful of CEOs sits next to a tableful of street people next to a tableful of judges next to Findlay Market shoppers doing Bloody Marys.
It's a circus, this, which Sunderman presides over with non-stop banter while slicing up sauerbraten, pot roasts and hams.
But not for long. Sunderman is selling the cafe and building with 11 apartments. It has been in his family 65 years.
“It's been a good life, but I'm ready to sit down,” he says. “I have five grandchildren and golf to play. I'm ready.”
One more thing: Real estate agent Chris Schoonover, who has the listing, usually mails post cards with pictures of her listings. For this one, she's sending a picture of Sunderman. “He is Stenger's. The building isn't,” she says.

Gillman
10-30-2006, 17:27
Thanks Dale.

I guess all good things come to an end..

Who upholds today the traditions of old Germania in Cincinnati...?

Gary

TNbourbon
10-30-2006, 18:09
:bowdown: Is it any wonder, really, that SB.com is so popular?! Look it, here -- we're talking (as in, expert opinion!) about Cincinnati chili!!! See Jim for software-writing expertise, Dane for networks, Chuck for bourbon and publishing, Gary for whisk(e)y and beer history and technology, Bettye Jo for insider bourbon info, Bobby for day-lilies and Jim Beam, Cliff for trademark and internet property issues, Doug for sand-blasting, Julian for bourbon production, profile selection and marketing, Ken W. for corporate distillery info...
Well, you see my point, I trust.
Bourbon draws us here, but the sheer capacity of expertise within and among our membership surely makes this a must-visit site for almost any question. Bottom line is -- WE KNOW EVERYTHING!:bigeyes:

cowdery
10-30-2006, 22:32
Thanks Dale.

I guess all good things come to an end..

Who upholds today the traditions of old Germania in Cincinnati...?

Gary

I can't speak for Cincinnati, but I'm going to guess it's similar to here in Chicago. We've probably lost half of our German restaurants in the last 25 years, which means we only have 500 or so left.

robbyvirus
10-30-2006, 23:52
A few random comments on things mentioned above:

1. "Over-the-Rhine" is a neighborhood in Cincinnati that used to be a working class German area in the early 1900s. Today it is a very rough neighborhood, to put it mildly. Vine Street was starting to get gentrified a bit maybe five years ago, with a couple of art gallerys and cafes, but in recent years that seems to have faltered somewhat as the drugs and crime have pushed back. There were also some racial disturbances due to a police shooting a couple of years ago which didn't help. Too bad, because the neighborhood has some amazing architecture...old 19th century brick buildings that would be beautiful if they were renovated, but that won't happen as long as developers are afraid to even go there.

2. Cincinnati chili is of Greek origin, concocted by Greek immigrants who moved to the city. No connection to the southwest or Mexico.

3. Indeed, Empress Chili has seen better days. When I was a kid they were all over the city, but now I only know of two. Dixie Chili was another chain that used to be common, but which I think has fallen on hard times. I've never tried that one. Skyline and Gold Star are doing quite well, though.

4. Cincinnati is indeed a great town. As I mention above, there's some really great 19th century architecture if you look around for it. And Covington, right along the river, has some really wonderful buildings as well. It's funny, as soon as you go over the river it feels like you're suddenly in the south.

NeoTexan
10-31-2006, 04:59
It's funny, as soon as you go over the river it feels like you're suddenly in the south.

My co-worker from Cincy explained to me why the bridge is a double decker. The upper deck goes south so they can toss their shoes down to those heading north. :lol: :lol: :lol:

And lets not foget a better selection of fine bourbons on the south shore.:bowdown: :bowdown: :bowdown:

barturtle
10-31-2006, 05:03
Skyline has stores in many locations, not just Cincy: Louisville, Indy, even up in Michigan. You can even order their chili in cans online.

cowdery
10-31-2006, 11:21
When I lived in the Cincinnati area, in the early 70s, so many Kentuckians who had moved north would go home on weekends that the Brent Spence Bridge (the "double-decker" described above) would be backed-up southbound for miles on Friday afternoon/evening and the same would be repeated northbound on Sunday night. It was quite a phenomenon.

Also at that time, Cincinnati itself was "squeaky clean" and all of the vice was on the Kentucky side of the river, particularly in Newport. There was a big scandal when Cincinnati's mayor got busted for visiting a Newport prostitute. He got caught because he paid her with a personal check! The dope was none other than TV talk show host Jerry Springer.

Back to the chili, I will concede Gary's point as to the name. It probably was "borrowed" from the Tex-Mex dish. Why is probably something we'll never know. It could just as easily, and perhaps more accurately, have been called "Greek Spaghetti."

At about that same time, the early 70s, the New Yorker's food writer at the time, who just happened to be Calvin Trillin, came to Cincinnati and wrote about three things: The Maisonette, a well-known local gourmet restaurant, a road house near Oxford most notable for the full size theater organ the owner would play during dinner, and Cincinnati Chili.

Gillman
11-20-2006, 12:38
Well, I'm not a maven but I can now say Cincinnati chili is not a stranger.

I had it from Goldstar, one of the chains in the Cincinnati area.

I had it on the pasta without onions and beans. I used cheese but on the side, essentially as a condiment. I could see that people just mix it in but it seemed like too much.

I thought it was great, it was digestible and very tasty. The sauce had all the Greek/Near Eastern spices I'd read about such as cinnamon, oregano or basil, etc. It was lightly spicy (in heat) and did not need the hot sauce sachets that came with it although I used one.

I also ordered one of their hot dogs, these are little short ones and for this I piled on everything. Again: superb.

I thought I detected some lamb in the meat sauce. The sauce was medium thick, just perfect.

I was with others and $20 covered three chilis (two with everything) and 4 of those hot dogs. Now that's a good deal. I was very pleased with this local specialty and will revisit it at some point. I'd like to try Skyline's version which some people I met swore by.

Gary

P.S. In the end bourbon did not accompany this food, just good old water and that was fine. The bourbon came later.

jokermh
12-07-2006, 09:02
Well, I'm not a maven but I can now say Cincinnati chili is not a stranger.

I had it from Goldstar, one of the chains in the Cincinnati area.

I had it on the pasta without onions and beans. I used cheese but on the side, essentially as a condiment. I could see that people just mix it in but it seemed like too much.

I thought it was great, it was digestible and very tasty. The sauce had all the Greek/Near Eastern spices I'd read about such as cinnamon, oregano or basil, etc. It was lightly spicy (in heat) and did not need the hot sauce sachets that came with it although I used one.

I also ordered one of their hot dogs, these are little short ones and for this I piled on everything. Again: superb.

I thought I detected some lamb in the meat sauce. The sauce was medium thick, just perfect.

I was with others and $20 covered three chilis (two with everything) and 4 of those hot dogs. Now that's a good deal. I was very pleased with this local specialty and will revisit it at some point. I'd like to try Skyline's version which some people I met swore by.

Gary

P.S. In the end bourbon did not accompany this food, just good old water and that was fine. The bourbon came later.


Living in the Cincy area (one of those northern KY guys) - it's a personal thing, Goldstar vs Skyline - I like both, depends on the day and who's driving as to which one I'll eat. Cheese on the side though ....? Cheese coney's are great, get a coney crate and a 12 pack, set for 2 or 3 meals. Agree probably not best with bourbon.

Next time you're in town, let me know - I can help you navigate that bridge with or without shoes.

PS - maisonette is now closed as well.

Gillman
12-07-2006, 09:15
Thanks and it's dishes like this that lend character and colour to the regional parts of the U.S. (which is all parts, really).

Now who can tell me aboput ciopinno (sp.?), the Bay Area specialty. Is that still made, where is a good place to get it?

Speaking of Bay Area and environs, thanks Jim for the cool snow flakes appearing as you open the SB site. But how come they ain't bourbon-brown? :)

Gary

Gillman
12-07-2006, 09:16
Thanks and it's dishes like this that lend character and colour to the regional parts of the U.S. (which is all parts, really).

Now who can tell me about ciopinno (sp.?), the Bay Area fish soup specialty. Is that still made, where is a good place to get it?

Speaking of Bay Area and environs, thanks Jim for the cool snow flakes appearing as you open the SB site. But how come they ain't bourbon-brown? :)

Gary

Solomon2
01-17-2007, 17:41
Since I keep kosher I can't enjoy C-Chili the way most people can, but nonetheless it is the basis for my favorite chili recipe. I used the recipe in one of The Frugal Gourmet books, use all-beef or 2/3 beef 1/3 turkey, and cut the amount of vinegar in half. As I'm partial to beans, I add half-black and half-kidney beans and cook everything until the beans are very tender.

Sometimes I'll add a shot of bourbon, but not too much - the bourbon is just to enhance the aroma of spiciness.

I serve my chili over spaghetti and prefer to wash it down with lager. It makes for a most satisfying meal.

Gillman
01-19-2007, 09:12
The dish is one of those that suit different types of preparations and ways of eating it. I leave out cheese more to save calories (not that these stratagems seem to work much..).

I don't know if I mentioned this earlier, but I thought one of the commercial brands I tried in Cincinnati had some lamb in it.

The people I was with insisted only beef was used but it had a lamb taste to me (partly), which is fine because I like that taste.

This is really an excellent dish in my view. So many American (and Canadian) regional dishes are good if made right and freshly cooked. Sometimes new dishes are created (Buffalo wings, late 1960's; Philly steaks and later cheese steaks (from 1930's on)). Some are very old, e.g., chili (traditional style). I want to try one of those tenderloin sandwiches I've read about you can get in the Mid-west.

Gary

cowdery
01-19-2007, 23:44
I want to try one of those tenderloin sandwiches I've read about you can get in the Mid-west.

I grew up with these, not knowing they were anything special and, in my opinion, they aren't. Think wiener shnitzel on a bun.

hookfinger
01-28-2007, 13:29
I only lived in Cincinnati for a brief time (6 mos.) but fell in love with the city and never pass an opportunity to visit. Vine street has some nice music venues and record shops. But Skyline chili is a godsend. I love it on a dog piled high with shredded cheese and a splash of their own hot sauce. I was pleasantly surprised to find one in Loiusville. And walking across that bridge into KY is kinda funny in that the first thing you notice is the large neon signs simply advertising "Whisky!"

ILLfarmboy
01-28-2007, 15:26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gillman http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/red2black/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthread.php?p=79603#post79603)
I want to try one of those tenderloin sandwiches I've read about you can get in the Mid-west.



I grew up with these, not knowing they were anything special and, in my opinion, they aren't. Think wiener shnitzel on a bun.

I don't know what a wiener shnitzel is but I can testify to the fact tenderloin sandwiches are nothing to write home about. It's hard to believe they are actually made from the tenderloin because they are not tender. They're beaten very flat with a tenderizing mallet, usually breaded, deep fat fried and served on a bun.

A hundred times better is butterfly pork chop sandwich. Especially when cooked outside on a grill. (outdoor festivals and such)

For something Midwestern try a made-rite; a loose hamburger sandwich made with "made-rite sauce" served on a bun. Moist, greasy, messy and very tasty. We have "made-rite" restaurants, it's their signature item.

boone
01-28-2007, 15:48
I was raised in a large family. We had a huge garden...Seemed as if it were 10 acres :( I spent a lot of time in the garden during the summer breaks, of my youth...It seemed as if the rest of my free time was spent canning tomatoes, snappin' green beans, and shuckin' corn. I swore that when, "I got big", I ain't never gonna have a garden...I'll buy this stuff...

I kept true to the promise...I hate gardening...always have and guess I always will.

Anyway, back to th original post. We always killed hogs the first cold weekend in November...The best part (really there isn't) was on the first supper after the hangin'...Daddy would cook us tenderloin sandwitches...The prime cut was from there and I will admit, it's the best.

I ain't a farm girl...never claimed to be...never wanted to be but simply stuck into the "lifestyle" from being in a large family.

This has nothing to do with Chili...so any further discussion might be moved to "new thread" about tenderloin :grin: ...

Bettye Jo


The dish is one of those that suit different types of preparations and ways of eating it. I leave out cheese more to save calories (not that these stratagems seem to work much..).

I don't know if I mentioned this earlier, but I thought one of the commercial brands I tried in Cincinnati had some lamb in it.

The people I was with insisted only beef was used but it had a lamb taste to me (partly), which is fine because I like that taste.

This is really an excellent dish in my view. So many American (and Canadian) regional dishes are good if made right and freshly cooked. Sometimes new dishes are created (Buffalo wings, late 1960's; Philly steaks and later cheese steaks (from 1930's on)). Some are very old, e.g., chili (traditional style). I want to try one of those tenderloin sandwiches I've read about you can get in the Mid-west.

Gary

Gillman
01-28-2007, 15:59
Thanks all. We can do a new thread, but I've learned a lot. I thought tenderloin sandwiches are the same as the butterflied sandwich mentioned, so I see now these are two different things.

I never heard of the made-rite sandwich, I like that, want to try that too.

In Ontario we don't have many local foods or preparations but one that most people know is the peameal bacon sandwich. This is the cured but not smoked pork loin, cut in thick slices, coated (whole before the slicing) in yellow corn meal (nothing to do with peas, maybe yellow pea meal was used originally), fried, and piled on a kaiser roll. It is very good with a little mustard or ketchup and some people specify a dusting of black pepper. You can add tomato slices and lettuce. Traditionally though it is eaten plain. I've tried it on different breads but for some reason only a kaiser roll will do.

The Mennonite summer sausage sandwiches from southwestern Ontario are very good and here, I've seen (in their native area) most people eat them on plain white bread, the Wonderloaf-type. And strangely, it tastes really good that way. But the summer sausage has a lot of salt and I find it hard to take that as I get older. The peameal, being commercially cured and kept cold until sold or prepared, is not too salty at all.

Gary

cowdery
01-30-2007, 18:30
A parting shot.

Gillman
01-30-2007, 19:23
Gimme five of 'em!

Gary

cowdery
01-31-2007, 10:38
This is the first I've heard of Maid-Rite Sandwiches, even though they seem to be in this basic region. Since I love this sort of thing (regional cuisines, that is) I did some research and found the Maid-Rite Web Site. (http://www.maid-rite.com/)

Apparently, Gary, their menu includes tenderloin sandwiches.

Gillman
01-31-2007, 11:12
Thanks much that looks great. This is an operation with long roots (i.e., one of the older, smaller franchises like White Castle - I like that one too) and is no retro invention, I love the pictures of the store and counter from the 1930's. Even if (as inevitably) new locations are just copies of the original, at least there was an original! And they are using the same recipe for their signature dish. In fact, their whole menu has a 1930's feel to it. I am on a loose sandwich quest, friends...

Gary

Gillman
01-31-2007, 15:24
Some may be interested (or not) in my interest in such plain Jane regional fare. It has to do less with how the food actually tastes - although often the food is justification enough - and more to do with the fact that it is real and comes from real places. (So does more elegant fare, which is as valid, just different). One time I read in a biography of (famed American novelist) Jack Kerouac that he first met his first wife, Edie Parker, in a luncheonette in Manhattan. And what drew Edie Parker to Jack's attention, he later said, was that she ate one after the other four hot dogs covered with sauerkraut! He loved that and it made him love her. Kerouac had a tendency to exaggerate in the later years, but the marriage didn't last too long, so probably he was more right than wrong in the recollection. To me that story is all about luncheonettes and being young and America, really.

Gary

CrispyCritter
02-02-2007, 21:31
This is the first I've heard of Maid-Rite Sandwiches, even though they seem to be in this basic region. Since I love this sort of thing (regional cuisines, that is) I did some research and found the Maid-Rite Web Site. (http://www.maid-rite.com/)

Indeed, they're mostly in Iowa and western Illinois (e.g. Quincy and the Quad Cities area). There are a few in Ohio as well, but it seems that they skipped the Chicago area completely.

Another out-of-place regional franchise that I've seen is the Wienerschnitzel (a California chain of hot-dog stands) in Champaign, Illinois. Their hot dogs were OK, but I'd take a Chicago dog over theirs any day.

jbarlycorn
09-09-2007, 14:30
Camp Washington Chili is my personal favorite. "American Regional Classic" James Beard Award, CBS News 1985 "the best chili in the nation". Blues musician Lonnie Mack sings a song entitled "Camp Washington Chili".[ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_Washington_Chili#_note-2)
Open 24 hours, its relation to bourbon is pehaps best decribed as an "after the bars close" destination. Any similarities to Mexican mole dishes are purely coincidental.
Cheap, watery, greasy, and VERY good.
Robert

jburlowski
09-09-2007, 17:46
Open 24 hours, its relation to bourbon is pehaps best decribed as...Robert

... "better than the dry heaves".