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Pappy's Friend
11-20-2006, 20:38
I'm frying my Thanksgiving turkey again (fifth year straight), and am looking for suggestions of your favorite pour with a spicy fried turkey. What do you suggest?

jburlowski
11-21-2006, 15:39
I always (partly because it can be a little cold outside here at Thanksgiving) have WT101 with mine.

TomH
11-21-2006, 16:54
I hope this is not considered blasphemy, but for a pairing with spicy fried turkey, I think I would save the bourbon for dessert (great match with pecan pie) or after dinner (great with football) and drink Riesling with the bird. Of course a good high proof like GTS would be excellent for drinking while cooking the bird to keep warm <G>.

Tom

TNbourbon
11-21-2006, 17:56
...Riesling with the bird...

I might lean toward a spicier Gewurztraminer myself, but I commend and second the thought...

BourbonJoe
11-21-2006, 20:37
Riesling for me, especially an Auslese from the Rheingau.
Joe :usflag:

Pastor Bourbon
06-12-2007, 08:18
Marinade the Turkey with Wild Turkey for at least 24 hours. I'd never heard of this before; but experienced it last Thanksgiving when an Aussie friend decided to celebrate an American Holiday and found a recipe in one of her cookbooks. She was a tea-totaler and gave me the rest of the bottle into the deal :D

cowdery
06-12-2007, 14:23
It's hard to imagine how you could marinade a whole turkey in Wild Turkey and still have some left in the bottle. Presumably, WT was just one ingredient in the marinade.

Underwriters Laboratories says turkey fryers are inherently unsafe. Soaking the bird in 101 proof alcohol before dropping it into the hot oil would seem designed not to improve that safety rating.

But, hey, you're on an island. How much trouble can it cause?

HighTower
06-12-2007, 15:02
But, hey, you're on an island. How much trouble can it cause?
Chuck, it's a pretty big island.....and Pastor Bourbon doesn't live too far from me....I would throw down fire blankets and such over my bottles if I saw the "turkey fryer fire" coming, but for the most I would grab my favorites and run...waiting for the inevitable mushroom cloud as my house exploded!:lol:

Scott

Pastor Bourbon
06-13-2007, 07:29
LOL!!! Thanks for the belly-laugh, Cowdery. (I've been wondering how to pronounce your 'handle'.)

Yes... the recipe used about 500mls of Bourbon; but it was still a fairly honey consistency marinade. She had to re-baste it or whatever the term might be as it was kept in the fridge while it 'soaked.'

Island it might be; but in a sugarcane growing region such a meal could be disaster...lol

As far as the fire's concerned, I'm the chaplain for several of the local rural fire brigades; so if the worst should come to the worst we could always use the failure as a meal as good practise for controlled burn of a kitchen fire...:D

Pastor Bourbon
06-13-2007, 09:15
Hey! Look at what I found! Googled Bourbon Turkey...

For the bourbon and mustard glaze, stir together in a small bowl 1/4 cup of the bourbon, 1/4 cup of the mustard, and 1/4 cup of the brown sugar. With your fingers, separate the turkey skin from the breast meat, taking care not to tear the skin or pierce the meat. Rub about half the glaze under the skin onto the breast meat; set aside the remaining glaze. Season the bird with salt and pepper. Tie the drumsticks together and tuck wing tips behind the back. Place the bird, breast side up, in the prepared roasting pan. Cover with lightly oiled aluminum foil and roast for 2 1/2 hours. Remove the foil, brush the turkey all over with some of the reserved glaze and baste with pan juices. Continue roasting, uncovered, 1 1/2 to 2 hours longer; brushing with glaze and basting from time to time. The turkey is done when a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh registers 180 degrees F and registers 165 degrees F when inserted into the stuffing.

www.marvalfoodstores.com/recipes/11-turkey.htm (http://www.marvalfoodstores.com/recipes/11-turkey.htm)

Sorry if that's not allowed. I plead ignorance though I know tis no excuse... Have I transgressed the unwritten law??? :)

cowdery
06-13-2007, 13:10
I've been wondering how to pronounce your 'handle'.

It's pronounced "COW-durry."

HD FBOY
06-16-2007, 10:36
I might offer the following:

Brine the bird in a mixture as follows (complements of the food network and Alton Brown):
1 cup kosher salt
1/2 cup light brown sugar
1 gallon vegetable stock
1 tablespoon black peppercorns
1/2 tablespoon allspice berries
1/2 tablespoon candied ginger
1 gallon iced water

Add some cheap bourbon (Southern Comfort might be interesting here as it is a LA spirit, yea I know it isn't bourbon) if you like, I wouldn't add more than a cup or two. and I have substituted water for the stock and would reduce the amount of stock for the bourbon. Also, if you use the bourbon I would add the ginger after tasting ( don't think it would complement the bourbon). (Note: I haven't tried the brine as adjusted here but have brined and roasted or fried a couple of dozen turkeys). One other thing, combine all the ingredients except the ice and water and bring to a boil, taste, add ginger if you like,taste, it will be real salty, pour this into the ice and water to cool the brine, then put the turkey in the brine, in a cooler and leave for 24 hours, checking the temp from time to time to keep under 40 degrees. If the temp approaches 40 degrees, add ice to keep the nasties at bay.

Remove bird, rinse the outside and inside of the bird.

If desired, Inject the bird with Cajun seasoning mixed with bourbon to a syrupy consistency, you don't want it too thick, but not watery either, I would mix this up a couple of days in advance, over medium heat to meld and then cool in the fridge. Taste as you go, should be real intense with the bourbon and the spices fighting for dominance, add water if necessary.

Pat dry and if desired sprinkle the exterior of the bird with the seasoning. Let turkey sit for 15 minutes. Put her in the fryer (OUTSIDE away from the house and trees) with the oil @ 320 but be careful frying turkeys is dangerous business. Cook to 165 in the thigh, don't hit the bone.

I suspect this would be quite tasty, and would consider making some kind of dipping sauce with the bourbon to serve with the turkey to complement. Not sure what here I would do here, need to thin k and experiment.

pepcycle
06-16-2007, 18:14
Darn You!!
Brining is apparently the world's worst kept secret.
There isn't a cooking method for poultry that doesn't benefit from some sort of brining.
I smoke turkey breast and brining is the key to keeping that very lean meat moist. (stuffing with an apple and onion and putting bacon under the skin helps)

I even brine fried chicken parts before soaking them in buttermilk and tabasco overnight.

Brine is King!!

HD FBOY
06-16-2007, 20:59
Darn You!!
Brining is apparently the world's worst kept secret.
There isn't a cooking method for poultry that doesn't benefit from some sort of brining.
I smoke turkey breast and brining is the key to keeping that very lean meat moist. (stuffing with an apple and onion and putting bacon under the skin helps)

I even brine fried chicken parts before soaking them in buttermilk and tabasco overnight.

Brine is King!!


Sorry, just trying to help!!

T47
06-16-2007, 22:55
Brine is King!!

Brine pork chops as well! It does help to keep lean meat moist and can really add to the flavor.
The secret is out....
We actually use our deep fryer more for big loads of hot wings now than anything else. We get 2 of them going and have a day we call fryfest, when folks can pretty much bring over any type of meat and fry it up. A buddy of mine did a Prime Rib roast...he said it tasted great...
I don't know about a total bourbon marinade...how much sugar is left in a bottle of bourbon. Sugar and hot oil don't mix well. We did an apple juice brined turkey (meant for the smoker) in the deep fryer and it came out looking like a hunk of coal!

HD FBOY
06-17-2007, 06:48
Try frying a whole fresh ham, to go with the fried turkey. Given time, brines will help most anything. I don't brine Boston Butts or Ribs. I do inject Boston Butts.

fredthecat
05-23-2008, 12:06
pairing a fried bird and whiskey is perhaps a slight cliche, but is delicious nonetheless