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tdt91
01-28-2007, 17:21
Hello all, my first time here but not my last. I was in Ireland in May of 06 and tryed some different Whisky's in a pub. My favorite was Paddy. Brought 2 bottles home and now looking for more but you cannot get it in the states. Has anyone else ever tried Paddy?
I took the Jameson Distillery tour and was selected to do a taste test. They used Jameson, Powers, Paddy, Jack Daniels, and a top rated Scotch.
I of course picked Paddy. My next favorite was Jack then Jameson then Powers and could not even stand the smell of the Scotch.

I'll drink to that!!!
TDT91

ILLfarmboy
01-28-2007, 17:39
Welcome.

No I've never had Paddy. My favorite Irishes are Redbreast, Jameson 12, Blackbush and powers in that order. I'm surprised you chose JD over Powers. Not saying your wrong, after all taste is subjective. A lot of people 'round here look down on Jack D. but I drink it.

tdt91
01-28-2007, 17:49
I grew up in Ill. Earlville. My parents live in Ottawa now. I live just north of Baltimore,MD.
I just read here that you can get Paddy in some of the Duty Free shops in the Air Ports. Ohare was mentioned. I'll be flying alot this spring and you know I'll be looking for it. I'm having a sip of Walkers deluxe at the moment.

ThomasH
01-28-2007, 18:21
I've never had Paddy's but wopuld love to try it. My favorite Irish wiskeys are all the more aged brands: Tullamore Dew 12, Jameson 12, Redbreast, Bushmills 1608 etc. I think Irish whiskey is absolutely fantastic. If anyone can get bottles of Paddy's, I would buy one in a minute!

Thomas

T47
01-28-2007, 20:24
I have never had Paddys either. I really enjoy Irish Whiskey. My current favorite is Redbreast. I have bottles of Black Bush, Bushmills Original, Bushmills 10, Knappogue Castle 1992, Tullemore Dew, and Powers. I have tried the Michael Collins Blend and enjoyed it, I hear the Single malt is very good but we don't have that in WA. as of yet.
We do have the Tullemore Dew 12, I will have to try that. I would like to try the Bushmills 21, but will probably try and find it at a restaurant first as it is so darn expensive.
I have yet to try Connemara, I think that might be one that disagrees with me as I hear it has a strong peat flavor.
Like Bourbon, I have yet to have an Irish I would not have again. Some are better than others, but I have found something to enjoy in all of them.

cowdery
01-29-2007, 00:51
The thing about Irish whiskey that gets me is that Ireland is even worse than the USA in terms of everything coming from the same couple of distilleries. There are only three: Middleton, Cooley and Bushmills. Most of what you hear about -- Jameson, Tullamore, Paddy's -- all come from Middleton. They do make both column-distilled grain whiskey and pot-distilled malt whiskey there, so you could say it's two distilleries at the same location, and just like with the USA, with any aged product there's a lot to be said for profiling differences, but ultimately you wish there were more producers, both here and there.

brockagh
01-29-2007, 04:33
The thing about Irish whiskey that gets me is that Ireland is even worse than the USA in terms of everything coming from the same couple of distilleries. There are only three: Middleton, Cooley and Bushmills. Most of what you hear about -- Jameson, Tullamore, Paddy's -- all come from Middleton. They do make both column-distilled grain whiskey and pot-distilled malt whiskey there, so you could say it's two distilleries at the same location, and just like with the USA, with any aged product there's a lot to be said for profiling differences, but ultimately you wish there were more producers, both here and there.

Paddy is unique, in that it's a blend of pot still whiskey, grain whiskey and malt whiskey. The malt comes from Bushmills, and the rest comes from Midleton. It wouldn't be a favorite of mine, but it has a big following in Co. Cork, in Ireland. All the other Irish blends are a mix of either malt and grain, or pot still and grain.

You're right about there being far too few distilleries in Ireland. However, most of the whiskeys are made in Midleton, and this is probably the most complex distillery in the world. Powers, Jameson and Cork Distillers all merged and moved their production to one purpose built distillery designed to have the cpaacity to make whiskey in the style of MIdleton, Jameson, Paddy Powers.... At Midleton, they have four massive pot stills and seven column stills. The distillate streams can be moved from teh pot still side to the column still side. They also use different malted and unmalted barley ratios depending on what brand they're producing.


You may know that there were once hundreds of distilleries in Ireland. But for one reason or another, the whole industry collapsed - war with the British Empire, prohibition in the U.S., taxation...

Hopefully, the Kilbeggan distillery will open again soon. The plan is to have it up and running by the end of the decade.

ThomasH
01-29-2007, 05:10
As far as Irish whiskey, I am not a huge fan of Bushmills, especially the regular white label. I have a bottle of the 1608 12yr. that was only sold in duty free. As fantastic as this blend is, I don't think it is available anymore. My personal favorite is Tullamore 12yr. Jamesons 12 is also quite good but has a different taste to it than the Tullamore, even though both are made at Midleton. As far as standard brands go, Powers is an excellent whiskey. It is said to have 60% malt content and at about 16.00 for 750ml around here it is a steal. Regular Jamesons and Tullamore Dew are also good but somewhat more expensive!

Thomas

ILLfarmboy
01-29-2007, 20:13
Am I imagining things or does Powers have quit a bit of pot still flavor for an inexpensive blend? It reminds me of cream soda whereas the standard Jameson's reminds me of apples specifically Granny Smith apples. I figure this is the difference between the grain whiskeys in the blend versus the pot stilled unmalted/malted barley showing itself more in the Powers.

brockagh
01-29-2007, 23:14
Am I imagining things or does Powers have quit a bit of pot still flavor for an inexpensive blend? It reminds me of cream soda whereas the standard Jameson's reminds me of apples specifically Granny Smith apples. I figure this is the difference between the grain whiskeys in the blend versus the pot stilled unmalted/malted barley showing itself more in the Powers.

Yes, Powers has much more pot still than the standard Jameson. There's no malt in it. They say it's distillate driven, rather than maturation driven.

cowdery
01-30-2007, 04:13
Paddy is unique, in that it's a blend of pot still whiskey, grain whiskey and malt whiskey. The malt comes from Bushmills, and the rest comes from Midleton. It wouldn't be a favorite of mine, but it has a big following in Co. Cork, in Ireland. All the other Irish blends are a mix of either malt and grain, or pot still and grain.

Isn't all malt pot and all pot malt? I thought it was the same as Scotland, malt whisky is pot-distilled, grain whiskey is column-distilled.

I know Middleton has both pots and columns, does Bushmills? I was under the impression (more like an assumption, really, based on nothing) that Bushmills makes malt whisky and the grain whisky for the Busmills blends comes from Middleton.

Gillman
01-30-2007, 04:35
Well, I would say not all pot is malt in the sense that "pure pot still" means whiskey distilled in a pot still from a mash made of barley malt and unmalted grains. I did not know Paddy combines malt whiskey, pure pot still (in this sense) and grain whiskey. I thought Irish blends were either malt whiskey and grain whiskey or pure pot still and grain whiskey. Bushmills uses malt whiskey made in Antrim (site of the famed Ulster Bushmills distillery) and grain whisky made at Midelton.

Gary

fitzharry
01-30-2007, 04:36
Isn't all malt pot and all pot malt? I thought it was the same as Scotland, malt whisky is pot-distilled, grain whiskey is column-distilled.

I know Middleton has both pots and columns, does Bushmills? I was under the impression (more like an assumption, really, based on nothing) that Bushmills makes malt whisky and the grain whisky for the Busmills blends comes from Middleton.

Chuck:

Actually, Irish pot still whiskey is a blend of malted and unmalted barley, and that's what gives it the unique taste. Redbreast 12 is pure pot still whiskey (unlike Power's and Jameson's, which are blends).

I believe that Bushmills has only pot stills, and all the grain whiskey for the Bushmills blends are indeed brought in from Midleton. Bushmills distills only malt whiskey, although it does make a few blends.

Harrison

Gillman
01-30-2007, 04:46
I find Black Bush a fine whiskey and value: 80% malt whiskey, 20% grain, I believe only one each is used. I think it is finished in sherry casks. I had a bottle almost full (leaving 3 ounces maybe) and topped it up with 16 year old Bushmills Malt (a version bottled only for the Liquor Control Board of Ontario) and now the BB is even better. I actually prefer it to the Bush 16 on its own which has a very unusual (for me) strong taste that Jim Murray, speaking (admiringly) of another Irish whiskey, pegged perfectly when he referred to "wet old raincoats"!

Gary

Joeluka
01-30-2007, 04:51
They sell a Bushmills 16 year old single malt here in the US too. Is the 16 yo you get up there not a single malt????

Gillman
01-30-2007, 05:25
Hi Joe and by the way, congratulations on the new birth!

This is a Bushmills Single Cask "Specially Selected For Canada". Distilled 1989. Actually, I see now that the label does not state the bottling date but there was a leaflet that came with it, which I no longer have, that I thought stated the whiskey was 16 years old. Very interesting nose of petrol, semi-oxidised sherry, and "cool glade in the forest". Very big in flavor too. It reminds me of some pure pot stills I've had even though it is all-malt (that "connection" the good Irish whiskeys have). Wet raincoats kind of sums it up too! I do enjoy it, actually, but I find this kind of whiskey is best blended and Black Bush is a fine example of the art.

Gary

Edward_call_me_Ed
01-30-2007, 06:31
I used to drink quite a bit of BlackBush. Since I got in bourbon in a big way two years ago I don't drink it often. I have a bottle of Bushmills 10 single malt open and have a pour occationally. I have the Paddy and like it a lot. Never had the Powers or Redbreast, but I have the Green Spot which I am told is young Redbreast. I have both Jameson and Jameson 12 and like them.

I am now waiting for the delivery of my first Bushmills 16 year old single malt.

Ed

nickynick
01-30-2007, 07:00
This is a Bushmills Single Cask "Specially Selected For Canada". Distilled 1989. Actually, I see now that the label does not state the bottling date but there was a leaflet that came with it, which I no longer have, that I thought stated the whiskey was 16 years old. Very interesting nose of petrol, semi-oxidised sherry, and "cool glade in the forest". Very big in flavor too. It reminds me of some pure pot stills I've had even though it is all-malt (that "connection" the good Irish whiskeys have). Wet raincoats kind of sums it up too! I do enjoy it, actually, but I find this kind of whiskey is best blended and Black Bush is a fine example of the art.

Which single cask is it? In the states we have a Sherry Cask, a Bourbon Cask and a Rum Cask. I have had the bourbon, but wasn't enough to get a feel for it. At $100+ a bottle they only gave me a little taste. I'm a big fan of Black Bush. As well as the single malts.

As for pot still whiskey, I had been reading alot about Redbreast 12 yo on this website. But at $44, I bought a bottle of Powers to see if I would even like pot still whiskey. It seems tangy, and smooth, however not as smooth as other Irish whiskies I've had. Only a 1/3 of the way through the bottle and I'm liking it more now then I did at first. I'm a bourbon drinker first, but I enjoy a good Irish often. I have Bushmills(White, Black, and SM 10) also Micheal Collins(Blend, and SM) as well as the Powers.

ILLfarmboy
01-30-2007, 07:13
As for pot still whiskey, I had been reading alot about Redbreast 12 yo on this website. But at $44, I bought a bottle of Powers to see if I would even like pot still whiskey. It seems tangy, and smooth, however not as smooth as other Irish whiskies I've had. Only a 1/3 of the way through the bottle and I'm liking it more now then I did at first. I'm a bourbon drinker first, but I enjoy a good Irish often. I have Bushmills(White, Black, and SM 10) also Micheal Collins(Blend, and SM) as well as the Powers.

Jameson's 1780 (the 12yr. "luxury blend" if you will) is cheaper (ten bucks cheaper in my area) than Redbreast and tastes similar certainly more full and more robust than the Powers gold label. I like the powers the best of all the budget blends.

cowdery
01-30-2007, 15:57
I like to think (please humor me) that I played a small part in getting Black Bush imported into the US. First, Gary, yes it is finished in sherry casks. I know it has a much higher percentage of malt than the standard, presumably 80% as you say.

Back in the early 1980s, Brown-Forman (through its Joseph Garneau subsidiary) had the U.S. distribution rights for Bushmills and the agency I was working for did some of the marketing for the brand. At the time, they strictly imported the standard blend. Some of the executives from both companies made a trip over to the distillery (I wasn't invited) and a couple brought back bottles of Black Bush in their luggage. They shared and we all loved it. Thereafter, whenever anyone was making the trip, we would all badger them to bring us some Black Bush and I obtained my first bottles of the stuff in that manner. We always joked that they finally started to import it so they wouldn't have to keep carrying it back for us in their luggage.

Sometimes when I am out with friends and my only bourbon choices are Jim, Jack and MM, I will opt for a Jameson. Otherwise I don't drink much Irish, but I'll always have a soft spot for Black Bush.

Gillman
01-30-2007, 16:27
Excellent! I'll bring my BB spiked with the Bush 16 to Chi in April.

Gary

brockagh
01-31-2007, 02:18
Yes, when I say pot still, I mean "pure pot still" in the Irish sense.

It's funny, because I often think that Bushmills has a pure pot still flavour, even though it's malt. Auchentoshan, the triple-distilled scotch whisky, does not have this.

I am not a huge fan of Bushmills, but they have released some very good single cask bottlings. And, one of my favourite malts ever is the Bushmills 1975 Millennium.

Also interesting, as Bushmills was bought by Diageo and is no longer part of Irish Distillers Group, they still have a deal in place in which they swap malt for Midleton grain, so they can both deliver their old lines.

cowdery
01-31-2007, 11:40
I hadn't ever known the definition of "pure pot still." Very interesting. I've always found it interesting that only the Americans mash different grains together. Everyone else makes "single grain" whiskeys, although it's possible that scottish and irish grain whiskey contains a mixture of grains, it not really mattering much since the high proof eliminates virtually all of the grain's distinctive character. Typically, grain whiskey is made from the cheapest grain available and in recent years that has been corn (maize), but I just learned recently that most have switched to wheat.

Anyway, the fact that the mash for pure pot still is made from a combination of malted and unmalted barley makes it at least a little like a bourbon mash, although not exactly since both are the same grain. Still, since "pure pot still" has been an effort to get back to a product like the traditional Irish "moonshine," known as poteen, it suggests a precursor to the American approach.

Gillman
01-31-2007, 12:04
That's absolutely right, Chuck, and in fact there is more evidence for your view, since, before Midleton was built in 1973 (thereabouts), pure pot still was made (in Dublin at the old plant) with a mash of, to be sure, malted and unmalted barley, but also including some unmalted rye, wheat and/or oats. The latter three were used in very small amount (less than 5% of the mash). After Midleton was built, they stopped adding rye, wheat or oats. Still, one can see in this regard a close connection to what emerged as U.S. practice. I assume that pure pot still was made in this way all over Ireland, including what is now the North (e.g. Bushmills originally made pure pot still too, is my understanding). Therefore, it's the old Scots-Irish influence at work (sorry, because I know you have doubts about that) because large-scale immigration from Eire did not occur until the mid-1800's and by then the convention for U.S. mashes had long been set.

Gary

Gillman
01-31-2007, 12:09
I agree Bushmills has an Irish flavour, not a Scots Lowlands flavor, even though it is triple distilled, all-malt whisky like Lowlands. Even though, that is, there are no unmalted grains used in Bushmills' pot still whisky.

I wonder what explains this. Maybe it is characteristics of Irish barleys. That, or particular maturation conditions, or maybe the yeasts used, I don't know.

Gary

Frodo
02-02-2007, 18:52
It's funny, because I often think that Bushmills has a pure pot still flavour, even though it's malt. Auchentoshan, the triple-distilled scotch whisky, does not have this.

I agree 100% with this statement! The first time I ever had Auchantoshan 10yr I thought "is this Irish"? After having the Auchantoshan 10yr HTH with Bushmills 10yr there is a distinct differance IMHO.

And I agree that Bushmills has some of that metallic "pot-still" character even though Bushmills doesn't make Pot-Still whisky by it's traditional definition.

T47
02-05-2007, 23:20
I went to the Liquor Store to buy some Bourbon and was a little distressed to see that they did not have a very exciting selection. They did have a bottle I have never seen here before...the Bernheim Wheat...I must admit I was tempted...but choose the Tullamore Dew 12 instead. If I go back in a few weeks and the Bernheim is still there then I will probably pick it up just to see what all the fuss is about. I do look forward to the Tullamore 12; I will have to try it side by side with the regular Tullamore.

Frodo
02-06-2007, 13:57
I do look forward to the Tullamore 12; I will have to try it side by side with the regular Tullamore.

I've heard that the 12 is very different (read - better) than the Tullamore NAS. Have tried the 'Heritage' and was really impressed! Haven't tried the 12 unfortunatly...

IrishWiskyChaser
02-22-2007, 05:58
Hi All, My first post, hope you don't mind me jumping in here. I have read through the whole thread and I was delighted that they’re plenty favorable comments in regards to Irish Whiskey. As an Irish person I love my Irish Whiskey but also very much enjoy Scotch and Bourbon. However I did notice some saying that this was a younger that etc and the fact that Midleton & Cooley produces so many different brands like say Buffalo Trace.

I think it may have been touched upon by one or 2 posters previously but the Distilling & Maturation process in Midleton is very complex and I'll try to give as brief explanation of Irish Pot Still Whiskey as I can while touching on other factors of Irish Whiskey. I'll try not to bore you all.

Irish Pure Pot Still Whiskey (a distillation from a single mash of Malted & unmalted Barley)

Even though Pot Still is considered the Typical Irish Whiskey it was always only one part of the Irish Distilling Heritage of old. What people may not realise is that various types of whiskey were always produced in Ireland until the early 1900's but it all went wrong with the advent of Irish Free State, World War 1, Prohibition, excessive Taxation and unscrupulous profiteering by both Irish & Scottish whisky traders.

We actually did have a good rep for Single Malt (Peated & Unpeated) and Blends but the Potstill make was the one that grabbed and dominated the whiskey world during the most part of the 19th century. It is hard to believe that Ireland dominated the whiskey trade then as Scotch does now by virtually the same percentages

Anyway back to Potstill. Redbreast & Greenspot are totally different beasts as was the Jameson 15yo Pure Pot Still (and this goes for most of the other brands).

The make up of most of the whiskies is very different. Not only are the blend ratios different but the ratio of ingredients are different for all the different usages of Pure Pot Still and the maturation is different.

Well apologies for the long winded reply

Redbreast uses a decent amount of sherry matured Pure Potstill however the potstill & grain whiskey used in Powers is matured solely in Bourbon barrels and the same for Midleton (+bourbon matured single malt) but the potstill would more than lightly have a different mash ratio of Malt & Unmalted barley to the powers also different cuts are taken which throws in another dimension. All very complex and confusing for all involved I'd imagine. So even though all these will use different aged whiskies it is not true to consider Greenspot a younger Redbreast.

Redbreast 12yo compared to Greenspot (circa 8yo) has a totally different character and one could not say these have the same Distillery trait (Well that's what I think anyway). But yes you still know your drinking a potstill which is a different type of character. To me it's like differentiating between a Laphroaig and a Lagavulin OB. Maybe my heart is too close to it and I'm splitting hairs but to me there are totally different.

IrishWiskyChaser
02-22-2007, 06:42
In relation to my Likes.....

I think to really appreciate Irish Whiskey you have to take one step up from regular NAS blends.

Bushmills

Bushmills White has too much sweet grain whiskey for me. Blackbush is a great value high malt content blend. However I'm not overly keen on the Single Malt 10yo or 16yo however some of the cask strength & single casks are just wonderful if you can get your hands on them. A cask strength Sherry cask can easily match a Macallan if you ask me.

Pick of the bunch for taste and Value Blackbush
Money no object go for a limited edition cask strength Sherry or bourbon barrel.

Jameson

I also actually think Jameson NAS is over rated like some. Powers is the best of the NAS Irish blends and paddy is again too grain sweet for me. Jameson 12yo is a great value Potstill blend with great balanced sherry. Jameson Gold is another hard to get Jameson but is due for general release soon. This is an interesting Jameson and comes across drier and woodier that any other offering that Midleton has on offer. Well worth a try for a different slant on Jameson but has the general traits of the 12 & 18yo. The Jameson 18yo is a great dram too and on the line of the 12yo just more refined but for 100Euro here in Ireland compared to 35Euro for the 12yo I do not think it is worth it. Midleton VR is a superb blend(no sherry) and is so smooth sweet that you could drink it all night but again for 120Euro not worth what you get for your money.


Pure Potstill

Redbreast 12 is a fantstic Pure Potstill with a nice balance of Sherry but the 15yo is sublime in my opnion and is richer, oilier with more lush sherry. The Greenspot is also wonderful but very different and eventhough there is sherry evident there is a slightly coppery/minty zing at the end. It is a mood thing with me to choose between Redbreast 12yo & Greenspot. Jameson Limited/Millennium 15yo Oure Pot Still is a bit too expensive & rare to have as an everyday dram. It is totally different from any of the above and as said earlier has an olded style feel to it with more understated floral taste to it.

I love them all but if you really dig the Pot Still Charachter and like Sherry the :bowdown: Redbreast 15yo for me is tops .

Cooley

Again none of the bog standard NAS blends really stand out to me but fine for bar occasions. Tyrconnel Single malt is not bad with Cooley's trade mark pears and some apple making an obvious appearence but still a bit light for me.

Locks 8yo is a good lightly peated single malt version of Tyrconnell but the Connemara is great either the single malt NAS, 12yo or Cask strength are all well worth a try, whicj one will depend on you budget . Ot's a smooth sweet Irish with plenty of Peat and smoke but no way as big as Ardbeg, Laphroaig, Lagavulin or Coal Ila from Islay. If you want something to match those try for a Cadenhead 13yo or 14yo Cooley if you can get your hands on one that is :hot: and at circa 60% an animal:70358-devil: but brilliant.

There are plenty more hanging around but hopefully these are a few highlights

Hedmans Brorsa
02-22-2007, 12:15
Interesting to hear your views! Mine differ insofar as that I thought the Jameson 15yo/Millenium was quite similar to the Redbreast 12yo. In fact, I have to admit having severe difficulties separating them on the basis of the nose, alone. On the palate, the Millenium distinguished itself with displaying far more mature oak in a pleasant manner.

Lest there be any misunderstanding, I have to state clearly that I dig the Redbreast 15yo, as well. But maybe, just maybe, it had too much of that "in your face"-feeling to qualify as true Irish, in my view. The Millenium felt more like a logical extension to the RB 12yo.

IrishWiskyChaser
02-23-2007, 02:46
That is the great thing about WHisk(e)y we all can get different things from them. I only opened the Jameson 15yo lately and really should do a comparison tasting with all the others. The only one I have not open is the Redbreast 12yo but have a bottle on hand. I've been meaning to do so but just have not got round to it yet. Will post my results once the feat is completed :cool:

Hedmans Brorsa
02-23-2007, 09:46
That is the great thing about WHisk(e)y we all can get different things from them.

Absolutely! And in all fairness, the Millenium was probably a pretty small batch affair which means the profile can easily change from bottle to bottle.

I still have an unopened bottle which I managed to lay my hands on last year, relatively cheaply. So far I haven´t been able to crack it open, knowing damn well that it will probably be the last one I open, unless I want to shell out a fortune for it.

Father&Son
02-25-2007, 13:43
Picked up a bottle of the Powers Gold Label last night. Found it very pleasant with good depth of flavor and none of the "wateriness" I dislike in similarly proofed bourbon. We've decided to make Red Breast a purchase in honor of St. Patrick's Day.

Question: Remarks on this thread discuss the high proportion of pot-still character in the Powers. The finish of this whisky, while smooth, leaves me with a strong impression of GNS or vodka. Is that the "pot-still flavor" people are referring to, or is it the presence of the GNS mentioned as a component of this blend that I'm detecting?

Gillman
02-25-2007, 14:30
What you are getting is the 20% grain whisky component, in my view. There is no grain neutral spirit in Powers as far as I know. The grain whisky lightens and "displays" the pure pot still element.

Personally, I like that finish, I think it lends style and panache to the pot still. On its own, pot still a la Irish can be a bit formidable unless the barrel or batch is perfectly pitched, which happens only rarely.

Gary

Father&Son
02-25-2007, 16:17
So should I expect more or less of that finish in the Red Breast? I have read that Red Breast is 100% pot-still; presumably that means less of the grain whiskey finish I'm detecting in the Powers?

Gillman
02-25-2007, 17:26
That is right. Redbreast is 100% pure pot still. It has a rich, typically Irish "linseed oil" (saddlery, waxy) character with a marked sherry cask influence. Not my cup of tea, but reputed by many experts and enthusiasts.

Gary

Hedmans Brorsa
02-26-2007, 09:54
; presumably that means less of the grain whiskey finish

It should mean no grain whiskey finish. In theory, at least.

I have the fullest respect for Gary´s tastebuds, but for some reason he doesn´t fancy Redbreast. It is my favourite Irish whiskey, though.

Although it has to be said that the experiences I´ve had with Green Spot (a younger pot still from the same distillery) makes me curious as to what a less sherry-influenced 12yo would taste like.

Gillman
02-26-2007, 10:07
Lennert, thanks for your remarks. I find pure pot still one of the most challenging styles of traditional whiskey due to its marked waxy character. All the pure pot stills have it to a greater or lesser degree. I like it when the influence is only moderate, which I find in Green Spot, for example (or Powers) and counterpointed (but not too much) by other flavours.

As was mentioned recently by a new member of SB, Green Spot is not simply a younger version of Redbreast. They are formulated differently. I prefer the Green Spot formulation which attains a minty, "Juicy Fruit" character (this is a spearmint-flavoured chewing gum in North America). However I have been disenchanted with Green Spot in recent years because I find it too mature. I like it at about 8 years or perhaps less (whatever it was bottled at 5 years ago and more). Too much aging layers excessive wood over those flavours of mint and menthol.

But Redbreast is a different story. It is noticeably oily in texture and flavour - this is I believe a traditional Irish taste since the non-NAS Jamesons all have it, even single malt Bushmills has it to a degree! Sherry helps (which is why it is aged or finished in sherry barrels) but it doesn't cover over the taste completely.

I like Powers though which has some of that taste, but in a moderate way, and helped in this regard by its admixture of grain whisky.

Gary

Father&Son
02-26-2007, 16:52
Thanks for the replies guys. I think we'll give the Red Breast a try rather than Black Bush or Jameson's 12 y/o. Black Bush and Jameson's 12 are both approximately the same price, and Red Breast sounds like it may give us the clearest expression of the pure pot still so we'll know if we like it. Thanks again. I'll post again after St. Patty's day!

ILLfarmboy
02-27-2007, 11:09
....
But Redbreast is a different story. It is noticeably oily in texture and flavour - this is I believe a traditional Irish taste since the non-NAS Jamesons all have it, even single malt Bushmills has it to a degree! Sherry helps (which is why it is aged or finished in sherry barrels) but it doesn't cover over the taste completely.

I like Powers though which has some of that taste, but in a moderate way, and helped in this regard by its admixture of grain whisky.

Gary

I love Redbreast. It has such a rich flavor and mouth-feel especially for an 80 proof whiskey. Knowing it was aged in ex-sherry casks, and thinking that was largely what I was responding to, I bought a bottle of cask strength Mcallan (a sherry monster). I disliked it intensely to say the least. I dumped it out. I guess it's that pot-still character I can't get enough of. I have to wonder why anyone would want to cover over that taste. Different strokes for different folks.

Edward_call_me_Ed
02-28-2007, 07:54
I have been putting off buying the Redbreast 12 for a long time. But with St. Patrick's Day coming up I think I will have to go get a bottle.

Ed

TBoner
03-08-2007, 17:27
While I've sampled many SMSW, I've only dabbled in Irish whiskey - Jameson's NAS and Jameson's 18 have been favorites; I thought the 12 was okay. I have tried a few Bushmills, and the only one I remember any opinion on is the 16, which I enjoyed.

But tonight, with a pipe full of Virginia tobacco, I'm enjoying my first ever Red Breast.
I'm in love.

This has the best mouthfeel of any 80-proofer I've had, plus some really unique and terrific fruit notes. I'll post better tasting notes some other time, but overall, I think this is terrific. Looks like a bottle will be coming home with me on my next non-dusty whiskey-buying trip.

ILLfarmboy
03-09-2007, 10:41
...This has the best mouthfeel of any 80-proofer I've had, plus some really unique and terrific fruit notes. I'll post better tasting notes some other time, but overall, I think this is terrific. Looks like a bottle will be coming home with me on my next non-dusty whiskey-buying trip.

I've remarked before how Redbreast reminds me of orange Lifesaver Cream Savers.

I once mixed Redbreast With Welches sparkling white grape juice (the kind made to imitate champaign. I gotta say if real champaign tasted like that did I would actually drink the stuff.

TBoner
03-09-2007, 16:59
I remember reading that now.

It's interesting, because besides apples, I detected orange in the whiskey as well. But it was so distinct from the orange I get in a bourbon that I shrugged it off.

You nailed it. It's not the deep, rich character of orange peel that comes through in rye-heavy bourbon. It's more subtle and the slightly creamy mouthfeel contributes to the creme savers impression. Good call on that.