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View Full Version : Pics from the Dist. across from DSP-8



mozilla
06-21-2007, 12:04
Here are a few pics from what I believe was once called Old Joe and Prentice or was it Dowlings? Anywho...here goes.

cowdery
06-21-2007, 12:59
Those warehouses are full of Wild Turkey now, but they were part of Old Joe.

The distillery now known as Four Roses and the "other" distillery there were both called Old Joe and Old Prentice at various times, but I tend to use the name Old Joe to refer to the "other" distillery.

Yes, that's it, but I recall some ruins on the site of the actual distillery, a little further down the road, although perhaps those have finally been leveled. I have a mental picture.

ThomasH
06-21-2007, 13:36
When I took the tour at Four Roses in April 06', the tour guide told me those warehouses acroos the street were owned by Seagrams until they were sold in the 1960's to what is now Wild Turkey. Seagrams didn't want to spend the money to repair them so they sold them!

Thomas

cowdery
06-22-2007, 13:22
That may be true and it may be that Seagram's bought them from whoever owned Old Joe, and possibly Seagram's owned Old Joe along the line too. Seagram's owned about 14 distilleries in Kentucky alone during WWII.

dave ziegler
02-26-2008, 10:30
Here are a few pics from what I believe was once called Old Joe and Prentice or was it Dowlings? Anywho...here goes.
Great Pictures again Jeff and again the Warehouses are so differant from the ones at Kinsey they must have been one of a kind at Linfield. It is great to see these while they are still there to see! keep up the good work!
Dave Z

cowdery
03-01-2008, 15:32
Most rural warehouses in Kentucky are wood frame structures with a thin skin of corrugated steel or aluminum. Most look more or less like the ones shown here.

Those were considered too insecure for urban areas so most urban warehouses are brick, many of which can also be heat cycled. Because urban real estate is more expensive, they tend to be close together and therefore don't get as much natural airflow, so fans if not actual heating is often used.

The new warehouses at Beam, Turkey and elsewhere are rackhouses. Beam isn't building any new palletized warehouses, but the new ones look more like other types of pre-fabricated steel buildings, with exteriors that look more like aluminum siding than corrugated.

dave ziegler
03-02-2008, 06:36
Most rural warehouses in Kentucky are wood frame structures with a thin skin of corrugated steel or aluminum. Most look more or less like the ones shown here.

Those were considered too insecure for urban areas so most urban warehouses are brick, many of which can also be heat cycled. Because urban real estate is more expensive, they tend to be close together and therefore don't get as much natural airflow, so fans if not actual heating is often used.

The new warehouses at Beam, Turkey and elsewhere are rackhouses. Beam isn't building any new palletized warehouses, but the new ones look more like other types of pre-fabricated steel buildings, with exteriors that look more like aluminum siding than corrugated.
Thank you Chuck for the Information on Warehouses out in the Country,The Explosion proof ones at Kinsey had Heat and also as you said they all had fans on walls across from each other and they would move air around and what amount of Haet they had in them. I don't know if you saw the picture I put on but they had thermostats in them so when you were in there you could warm them up a little bit, but not much. They were even cold in the summer, and in Winter the company gave us Sub Zero WWII Army coats they bought! I wonder some times which type makes for Better Whiskey and I tend to think the old Wood & brick ones not the Heavy duty Explosion proof ones as the Rittenhouse Rye and Bourbon most times were kept in the old Wooden Rack with brick walls warehouses and RR rye was always an amazing Product! I always enjoy the great insight you have in these things Chuck!
Dave