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SlowEddy
06-25-2007, 19:29
Are corn squeezens the same as moonshine? Is it illegal for someone to run a still for their own use? I've been dying to try corn squeezens--as seen on many movies and TV shows.
If I can't make it myself, what type of commerical whiskey comes closest to being moonshine?

wadewood
06-25-2007, 19:47
I don't think I have heard of Corn Squeezens. It is illegal to operate a still without a federal permit. Obtaining said permit has been discussed here before; do a search and you should be able to find the threads.

There are several products sold as commercial "Moonshine". Heaven Hill makes Georgia Moon, Mellow Corn, and Platte Valley.

TNbourbon
06-25-2007, 19:58
Are corn squeezens the same as moonshine?..
Perhaps. There is also a process called 'squeezin' a barrel' by which the last drops of 'goodness' are recovered. See here:
http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthread.php?t=7440&highlight=squeezin%27


...Is it illegal for someone to run a still for their own use?..
Yes, as Wade notes, unless you've got enough resources to share your own-bourbon with others commercially.


...I've been dying to try corn squeezens--as seen on many movies and TV shows.
If I can't make it myself, what type of commerical whiskey comes closest to being moonshine?

On occasion, you might, if you're lucky -- while touring one of the whiskey distilleries -- be offered a chance to taste some 'white dog', or unaged spirit. I would be the commercial/industrial equivalent of 'moonshine'. Always interesting to see where the finished product originates.

ILLfarmboy
06-25-2007, 20:04
I don't think I have heard of Corn Squeezens. It is illegal to operate a still without a federal permit. Obtaining said permit has been discussed here before; do a search and you should be able to find the threads.

There are several products sold as commercial "Moonshine". Heaven Hill makes Georgia Moon, Mellow Corn, and Platte Valley.


Never heard of corn squeezens? How about the line: Mighty, mighty pleasin' your pappy's corn squeezens?

Mellow Corn and Platte Valley are aged products. I've yet to try them but I would like to. Georgia Moon is unaged spirit and in my opinion ain't nothing to wright home about.

boone
06-25-2007, 20:21
Around this area of Kentucky we sometimes refer to homemade illegal brew as "corn squeezin's" or "shine"....to put it southern :grin: :grin:

As most have reported in this thread it is illegal to produce this product.

In the hill's and holler's around here there are "stills" that "still" produce for "home consumption". Illegal as hell but it's still done.

MikeK
06-26-2007, 04:27
Right off the still is mighty tasty and can be had occationally on a distllery tour or in great variety at Woodford Reserve's Bourbon Academy. Georgia Moon is similar, but not nearly as good. I find Beam White label quite similar in flavor to raw spirit actually :)

I picked up a bottle of Mellow Corn last year in KY, it was tough to find even there. I liked it a lot. It has a great oily corn flavor. I'll definitely get 2 bottles next time...

snakster
06-26-2007, 05:12
How about the line: Mighty, mighty pleasin' your pappy's corn squeezens?
Nice to meet another George Jones fan. This line immediately leapt to mind when I saw the title of this thread.

Hedmans Brorsa
06-26-2007, 13:46
I
There are several products sold as commercial "Moonshine". Heaven Hill makes Georgia Moon, Mellow Corn, and Platte Valley.

Mellow Corn is a straight whiskey, bottled in bond. Is this really compatible with the definition of Moonshine?

Ive never thought of MC as a Moonshine product but then again, Im certainly no expert in this field.

OscarV
06-26-2007, 14:32
I have had Alabama White Lighting.
The smell and taste is a cross between vodka, rubbing alcohol and kerosene.
Heaven Hill's Georgia moon is quite similar.

MikeK
06-26-2007, 16:48
Mellow Corn is a straight whiskey, bottled in bond. Is this really compatible with the definition of Moonshine?


No, I guess not. It is an interesting product in its own little niche. Mellow Corn is aged enough that the "white dog" rawness is long gone. But it is still young enough that it hasn't become what you would recognize as Bourbon. It has a very pleasant flavor with great amounts of corn flavor, fruitiness, and oiliness. I think it is aged in used barrels, hence the light color and lesser degree of barrel influence.

Edward_call_me_Ed
06-26-2007, 20:18
No, I guess not. It is an interesting product in its own little niche. Mellow Corn is aged enough that the "white dog" rawness is long gone. But it is still young enough that it hasn't become what you would recognize as Bourbon. It has a very pleasant flavor with great amounts of corn flavor, fruitiness, and oiliness. I think it is aged in used barrels, hence the light color and lesser degree of barrel influence.

Yep, aged in used barrels. That is what makes it straight corn whiskey. It is a BIB so it must be aged at least four years. No matter how long it is aged in used barrels it will never become bourbon.

Ed

Edward_call_me_Ed
06-26-2007, 20:25
According to The Alaskan Bootleggers Bible corn squeezens is not whiskey. Leon W Kania says that empty jugs were plugged with dried corncobs and then placed in the bottom of a silo. Then corn silage was put into the silo to store for winter cow feed. The pressure squeezes the juice out of the corn stalks and the naturally occuring yeast on the plants causes it to ferment at the bottom of the silo. The the pressure also forces the fermented juice through the corncobs, which acts as a filter. Once the silage is used up the jugs are recovered and the corn squeezens are ready to drink.

Ed

boone
06-26-2007, 20:53
Nice to meet another George Jones fan. This line immediately leapt to mind when I saw the title of this thread.


Here's that little ditty he sings...

Corn squeezin's, the dew of Heaven, White Lightning :grin: :grin: :grin:

http://members.libreopinion.com/wasp/BEEr/corn.html

and one more note...Mellow corn is "CORN" whiskey :grin: :grin: ...

wku88
06-27-2007, 20:09
According to The Alaskan Bootleggers Bible corn squeezens is not whiskey. Leon W Kania says that empty jugs were plugged with dried corncobs and then placed in the bottom of a silo. Then corn silage was put into the silo to store for winter cow feed. The pressure squeezes the juice out of the corn stalks and the naturally occuring yeast on the plants causes it to ferment at the bottom of the silo. The the pressure also forces the fermented juice through the corncobs, which acts as a filter. Once the silage is used up the jugs are recovered and the corn squeezens are ready to drink.

Ed


Yup, silo juice is what I consider "squeezins", but like The Ol' Possum says, 'Shine can be called this as well. Most real 'Shine I know of is 100% corn, and has no rye or malt in it. Got a real musty, earthy taste too, not like white dog, or pure grain spirit like Everclear. At least all the stuff I ever had.

ILLfarmboy
07-01-2007, 21:09
According to The Alaskan Bootleggers Bible corn squeezens is not whiskey. Leon W Kania says that empty jugs were plugged with dried corncobs and then placed in the bottom of a silo. Then corn silage was put into the silo to store for winter cow feed. The pressure squeezes the juice out of the corn stalks and the naturally occuring yeast on the plants causes it to ferment at the bottom of the silo. The the pressure also forces the fermented juice through the corncobs, which acts as a filter. Once the silage is used up the jugs are recovered and the corn squeezens are ready to drink.

Ed


Man. That's gross!

Not too many farmers around here put up silage for the winter anymore. Everyone has went to raising hogs in confinement systems. Not a whole lot of cattle much anymore. Those few who do feed silage nowadays often use a silage pit (a hole dug out of the side of a big hill) instead of a silo.

Silage wouldn't necessarily be all corn stalks either. Suedex (sp?) was often used in addition to corn stalks.

Edward_call_me_Ed
07-02-2007, 08:08
Man. That's gross!

.

:grin: I have been waiting for you to chime in! My experience with silage is confined to the printed page and driving by silos. Still, I can only wonder....

Ed