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tsh3406
09-06-2007, 11:44
I need everyone’s help with a little cheat sheet. I’m trying real hard to find the time to go to the festival, and I don’t want to embarrass myself. Can anyone give me the names of all the distilleries and their Master Distillers, as well as any other names I should know?

Thanks,
Tim

Looking forward to seeing y’all again if I make it.

DrinkyBanjo
09-06-2007, 13:22
I'll start, Wild Turkey = Jimmy Russell.

OscarV
09-06-2007, 13:30
Four Roses=Jim Rutledge
Heaven Hill=Parker Beam
All the others I know, but I can't come up with them now.

BourbonJoe
09-06-2007, 14:54
Makers Mark - Dave Pickerill
Barton - Greg Davis
Joe :usflag:

barturtle
09-06-2007, 15:15
Wikipedia lists Fred Noe as the current master distiller of Beam, saying that Jerry Dalton retired this year.

gothbat
09-06-2007, 15:16
Woodford Reserve - Chris Morris

OscarV
09-06-2007, 15:17
Yes, but Fred Noe is not the Master Distiller.
I can't remember the name.

barturtle
09-06-2007, 15:21
Yes, but Fred Noe is not the Master Distiller.
I can't remember the name.


That's what I thought too...but can't think of who else they might have put in the position...

Barrel_Proof
09-06-2007, 15:33
Four Roses=Jim Rutledge
Heaven Hill=Parker Beam
All the others I know, but I can't come up with them now.

Parker Beam AND Craig Beam are the Master Distillers at Heaven Hill.

bluesbassdad
09-06-2007, 15:37
Buffalo Trace => Gary Gayheart (Elmer T. Lee, Master Distiller, Emeritus)

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

Barrel_Proof
09-06-2007, 15:38
That's what I thought too...but can't think of who else they might have put in the position...

Jerry Dalton, a Ph.D. chemist and published philosopher, is Master Distiller at Jim Beam.

mozilla
09-06-2007, 15:44
Charles Wathen Medley

OscarV
09-06-2007, 15:51
Was Jerry Dalton the Master Distiller at Barton before going to Beam?

mozilla
09-06-2007, 15:54
Was Jerry Dalton the Master Distiller at Barton before going to Beam?

I think it was Bill Friel.

Aged In Oak
09-06-2007, 17:33
Jerry Dalton, a Ph.D. chemist and published philosopher, is Master Distiller at Jim Beam.

I had no idea he was a philosopher. Somehow seems very appropriate, though!

bluesbassdad
09-07-2007, 00:52
In Chuck Cowdery's excellent documentary, "Made and Bottled in Kentucky", there are many highlights. One is the interview with Jerry Dalton. I can't recite a quote, but he conveys a very zen-like demeanor and approach to his craft. At times he seems to be deciding how deep into his thoughts to delve in order to provide an answer that is both adequate and intelligible.

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

nor02lei
09-07-2007, 04:35
Brown Forman: Chris Morris

Leif

pepcycle
09-07-2007, 07:23
Gayheart is retired/semi-retired at Buffalo Trace.

Harlan Wheatley is the current master distiller.

Ed

doubleblank
09-07-2007, 08:19
OK Tim, now you should know the past and current Master Distillers at each distillery. I hope you and your wife can join the fun once again.

You already met Julian as I recall. Drew Kulsveen with KBD (Black Maple Hill, Old Bardstown, Willetts, etc) may also show up at the Gazebo.

Randy

cowdery
09-07-2007, 11:35
Dr. Dalton is the author of The Tao Te Ching: Backward Down the Path.

Stu
09-09-2007, 07:37
Last month we went to a Jim Beam tasting in Little Rock and I thought they introduced Fred Noe as the master distiller. Bernadette says she remembered that they introduced him as the next master distiller, which I guess implies that Jerry Dalton is retiring.

Stu

boone
09-09-2007, 09:09
Oh...I hope you are right! :grin: :grin: :grin:

Barrel_Proof
09-13-2007, 08:20
It's official: Jerry Dalton is retiring and Jim Beam is naming Fred Noe its 7th Generation "Family Distiller and Bourbon Ambassador." Notably missing from his new title is the word "master."

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20746458/

cowdery
09-13-2007, 15:07
Where did you get that title? Not from the AP article. Though you're right that it never calls Fred "Master Distiller."

For what it's worth, historically the terms "distiller" and "master distiller" are synonymous.

Barrel_Proof
09-13-2007, 20:05
Jim Beam now describes Fred Noe in these terms on its website: "7th Generation Distiller & Bourbon Ambassador." Those are Beam's capital letters, not mine. (The Family Distiller description is apparently a fiction created by AP.) It's marketing sleight of hand, of course, because as everyone on the inside knows he can't step into Jerry Dalton's shoes.

http://www.jimbeam.com/beam/v5/heritage/seven_gen.aspx?id=7

http://resources.jimbeam.com/v5/heritage/fred_text.gif

"Fred" Noe, the seventh generation of Beams to enter the family business, is an 7th Generation Distiller & Bourbon Ambassador at the Jim Beam Distillery in Clermont, Kentucky. As "Bourbon Ambassador" for Jim Beam Brands, he introduces consumers around the world to The Small Batch Bourbon Collection, his family's award-winning lineup of ultra-premium, hand-crafted bourbons. Fred grew up in Bardstown, Kentucky, in the same home Jim Beam lived in, on what was once called Distiller's Row because a master distiller lived in almost every house. He still lives in Bardstown, in a house built beside the Beam family home, with his wife, Sandy, and their 16-year-old son, Frederick Booker Noe IV.

"I had such a feeling of pride and tradition the first time I came to the distillery with my father," Fred says. "Decades later, I still feel the same way. This is much more than a job, it's my life, and I love every minute of what I do."

bobbyc
09-14-2007, 21:13
Was Jerry Dalton the Master Distiller at Barton before going to Beam?

At the time of Chucks Video Made and Bottled in Kentucky The Jerry Dalton segment was him during his tenure as Master Distiller at Barton.

bobbyc
09-14-2007, 21:20
Wow it appears now that Jeremiah Beam was a Master Distiller beginning in 1947. That and probably the fact he never lived in the house at Clermont that bears his name would no doubt surprise him the most.

Why do they have to do this?

boone
09-15-2007, 05:56
Actually, T. Jeremiah wrote a letter to Carl Beam asking him to take young Booker under his wing and teach him the trade...

This letter was entered into a contest on one of their anniversary celebrations...

cowdery
09-17-2007, 10:04
Maybe Jere wrote a letter too, but the one I've seen was from Booker's mother to Carl Beam, asking him to teach Booker how to be a distiller. I also can't say if Jere Beam ever lived in what is now called the T. Jeremiah Beam house, but I know that Baker and David Beam grew up in that house with their father, Carl, as it was built to be the distiller's house, so the distiller could be on-call 24-hours a day.

I have been talking to Beam executives about this for months but so far those efforts have had little effect. The fact is, Park Beam (Jim's brother) and his descendants (Carl, Earl, Baker and David) made every drop of Beam whiskey for about 100 years, but the company has consigned their heritage to the dust bin. Why? To create the pretty fiction of an unbroken line from Jacob to Fred.

Jim Beam and his only son, Jere, were the business side of the operation. Park and his sons and grandsons made the whiskey. Both roles are important and that's nothing against Jim or Jere. I've never heard a bad word about either man. Jim Beam undoubtedly had to skills of a distiller and perhaps Jere (spelled that way but pronounced "jerry") did too, but they didn't work in that capacity. That was always Park's job. He and Jim were always partners from the time they entered the business (in those early days, their sister's husband was a partner too), with Jim handling the money and Park making the whiskey, and the whiskey-making stayed entirely on Park's side of the family until Booker came along.

As I keep saying, some producers (especially the non-distiller producers) have to invent history because they don't have any real history. Beam's real history is great. They don't need to make shit up. And, yet, they do.

As for titles, the title "master" distiller is of fairly recent creation. The person who made the whiskey was known as the distiller, period. Baker Beam, David Beam and Booker Noe were, simultaneously, the distillers at Jim Beam's two plants. Baker worked the day shift at Clermont and David worked the night shift. Booker worked at Boston. Booker was never Baker and David's boss. On the contrary, considering the relative status of the two plants among the production folks at Beam, the heirarchy would probably have been Baker, David, Booker.

Where Booker was superior was as a personality, a role he only began to play after he retired as an active distiller. Fred has followed him in that role. Fred Noe probably knows more about making bourbon than all of the rest of us put together, but he has never run a distillery. As much as anything, this reflects the changing role of the person bearing the title "Master Distiller," with the ambassador role assuming equal if not greater importance.

Today, the role most so-called "Master Distllers" play in the whiskey-making process is more as a quality control officer. This isn't just true at Beam or even just in the USA, but is often the case in Scotland as well.