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sku
10-31-2007, 10:37
Anyone tried this yet? I'd be interested in hearing about it. Apparently it's only available in Illinois, NY and NJ.

www.drinklucid.com

polyamnesia
10-31-2007, 19:01
there is a neoAbsinthe available here in PA with glass and sugar dissolving utensil as well....$30+ for the set...

am interested, being a reader of those french poets who imbibed...but i imagine it's lacking the (ab)original kick...

Joeluka
10-31-2007, 19:05
there is a neoAbsinthe available here in PA with glass and sugar dissolving utensil as well....$30+ for the set...

am interested, being a reader of those french poets who imbibed...but i imagine it's lacking the (ab)original kick...

It has wormwood in it and it's over 62% ABV. What other kick is there??:skep: :skep:

polyamnesia
10-31-2007, 19:07
well, is today's "absinthe" the same as the original? is this new stuff the true, outlawed Green Fairy?

if not, then it's missing the truly ILLegal "kick" !

Joeluka
10-31-2007, 19:15
My Bad.

This product is like the old because it does have wormwood in it. The wormwood was the ingredient that was illegal. Since this one has it, it is a genuine absinthe. The high proof makes it even more authentic.

Gillman
10-31-2007, 19:28
This is my understanding too, Joe. From what I have read, the amount of thujone in the drink is within the measurement tolerance accepted by the government. I.e., whatever the thujone limit is as currently recognised by EU law, the U.S. will recognise the same but for a different reason (not that absinthe is legal as such but that if it does not exceed this limit then, given the uncertainties in measuring it, it is considered as non-existent). Thujone is the element that was and justly so considered dangerous in absinthe, it exists in certain kinds of wormwood, notably the "absinthium" type.

I can't recall what that limit is, but it is quite low. But here is the thing. The gent that makes Lucid, Ted Breaux, or rather his company, states that when the best absinthe was distilled historically, thujone did not vaporise and enter the distillate. (Probably its vaporisation rate was very low or very high). He knows this from tests done on historical absinthes he has obtained.

So ironically, the best absinthe never had elevated levels of thujone and ergo Lucid is a hyper-authentic example! I have read very good reviews of it.

Gary

polyamnesia
10-31-2007, 19:34
hmm, so this IS the real McCoy. i really thought the newer "absinthes" were just a fad/revival, a virtual return to the "Universal Studios" version of the experience.

are there a good number of these out now? i might have to check my local store and see what they were selling.

what's the general flavor like?

Gillman
10-31-2007, 19:37
I have read that it is based on historical recipes except that in line with North American tastes the anise element has been slightly reduced. This is something I agree with since I find a strong anise flavor a little hard to take. It is there, but in a softer interpretation (and in any case anise would have varied brand by brand, I have a Portuguese brand which hardly has any anise flavor).

Gary

Vange
10-31-2007, 22:04
Lucid is supposed to be real and a quality product. Lots of the fake absinthe was from the Czech Republic and is absolutely garbage and undrinkable. La Fee Verte has tons of info about all things absinthe.

polyamnesia
11-01-2007, 16:36
does the absinthe experience (unique like all experiences!) tend more towards narcoleptic shoe-gazing.....or narcodelic, subterranean flights???

a sort of psychedelic opiate?

OscarV
11-01-2007, 16:57
I truely don't know since I never had it.

Could it be that if you were raised on 12 to 20 proof wine then this stuff blew your mind?

Since we attribute great works of art, or at least some people do, as a result of this stuff.

mier
11-02-2007, 09:23
[quote=Gillman;100591]I have read, the amount of thujone in the drink is within the measurement tolerance accepted by the government. I.e., whatever the thujone limit is as currently recognised by EU law, the U.S. will recognise the same but for a different reason (not that absinthe is legal as such but that if it does not exceed this limit then, given the uncertainties in measuring it, it is considered as non-existent). Thujone is the element that was and justly so considered dangerous in absinthe, it exists in certain kinds of wormwood, notably the "absinthium" type.


It wasn`t the thujonlevel that made it so toxic,only a very high dose can do you harm(like alcohol) according to scientist in the EEC,but distillers that tried to make a quick buck.They used coppersulphates for colouring that did the harm.After the green fairy was forbidden they brought an anis on the market that was the base of pastis.The present day absinth is like the original stuff only there`s now a natural colouring used.But i can`t say that i like it,if i have to drink an anisette i prefer arak.
Eric.

Vange
11-02-2007, 09:34
The only thing large amounts of absinthe does is get you very tipsy!

CrispyCritter
11-04-2007, 12:58
does the absinthe experience (unique like all experiences!) tend more towards narcoleptic shoe-gazing.....or narcodelic, subterranean flights???

a sort of psychedelic opiate?

No, it's just booze. :)

Anyway, I finally found a bottle of Lucid, and tried a glass last night. I think I over-diluted it - I would have liked a little stronger flavor. I'll need to measure the water that goes into the drink. Nonetheless, it went down well - it resembled (as well it should) my Pontarlier-Anis pastis, but with a bit more complexity and a slight bitter touch from the wormwood.

Even though I only had one drink of it, with one measured ounce of absinthe and an unknown amount of water, I did feel a bit of a stimulant effect. Keep in mind that well-made absinthes have a variety of herbs in them, and the combined effect of them all could indeed act as a stimulant.

You could probably get a similar effect from Irish coffee. ;)

Tonight's going to be a beer night for me, but I'm definitely going to be revisiting this bottle in the future - two thumbs up!

TBoner
12-04-2007, 16:17
This made it to Dallas, and I picked up a bottle today. I tried just a bit of diluted spirit (~100 proof) and found it quite enjoyable. Far less sweet than Herbsaint or Pernod. I like the combination of herbal flavors, in which anise is present and the most forward of the herbs, but not dominant. A very complex product. I'm now enjoying it in a Sazerac, and it's as though I've never had this cocktail before. I'll play with it more in its straight (diluted) state, but the Sazerac is my favorite cocktail, and I just had to...

I do anticipate a mild stimulant effect (BTW, thujone is toxic only when present at approximately the same level that caffeine requires for toxicity), both because of the herbal combination and because of the placebo effect. Regardless, I bought this because it got rave reviews from some cocktail revivalist junkies I know. I'm glad I did.

TnSquire
12-05-2007, 09:14
I had some in New Orleans back in October. I had the sugar cube spoon etc.

I had a little too much and it IS a different buzz. I saw no fairies ( well none in the mythological sense) but it is different than what I have experienced with alcohol.

Gillman
12-05-2007, 14:29
Today's New York Times has yet another article on absinthe, focusing on a just-approved one from St. George Spirits in Alameda, CA.

It seems there are three or four absinthes now approved for sale. While products meeting the ATF's maximum thujone content requirement (10 ppm I understand) can now be sold under the name absinthe, approval of the products and labelling seems a long, fairly complex process still.

Gary

loki1957
12-05-2007, 14:55
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/05/dining/05absi.html?pagewanted=1&th&emc=th

CrispyCritter
12-05-2007, 21:33
A couple of days after I had my first try of it, I went back and had a few pours, with a bit less dilution, and it turned out just perfect.

I still have yet to build a Sazerac with it, though... I need to pick up a lemon next time I'm at the grocery store. Hmmmm... Saz 18 and real absinthe - that sounds like a winner to me.

TBoner
12-06-2007, 05:25
What was your dilution rate? I went 3:1 (water:absinthe) last night. It was quite nice. I'd imagine 2:1 would also be good. I wouldn't have wanted it more diluted than it was, I think (though I understand historically 4:1 or so would have even been acceptable...not that I feel compelled to "obey" any unwritten code from days gone by:rolleyes::grin:). The bitterness is pleasant, as in a moderately hopped beer.

Now I just need to get an absinthe spoon and practice my water pouring technique so I can fully experience the ritual of preparation and consumption.

OscarV
12-06-2007, 06:18
Now I just need to get an absinthe spoon and practice my water pouring technique so I can fully experience the ritual of preparation and consumption.

And that would be, I think I have this right.
Absinthe in a glass, spoon balanced over the glass with a sugar cube in it,
pour very cold water on the sugar cube and let it stream into the glass with the Absinthe.
And from what I understand a pleasant odor fills the room.
Right?

TnSquire
12-06-2007, 14:20
I didn't smell anything. However, I was in a bar in pirate alley and people were smoking. The rest is correct though.

Tracy Hightower
12-06-2007, 15:25
I have done a LOT of research on Absinthe in the last couple of weeks and have gained a clear understanding of the product in both the new and the old versions.

Absinthe was banned in nearly every country by 1915 because it was thought to be an addictive and mind-altering drink that has many side effects that caused people to commit violent acts. The most common side effect was thought to be hallucinations.

The hallucinogenic effect was thought to be caused by the chemical Thujone, which is found in Wormwood from which Absinthe is made. Thujone is a convulsive neurotoxin that in certain amounts can cause renal failure and even death. It has been found that there is not enough Thujone in absinthe after distillation to cause any of these problems including hallucinations.

The US government has only approved a limited number of brands of Absinthe for sale in the US and has dictated that the amount of Thujone can be no more than 10 mg per kg of absinthe. Oddly, the amount of Thujone present in sage and sage oil is 50% and is generally recognized as being safe by the FDA.

Although they have only approved a few brands for sale in the states, one I know is made in France and the other in Switzerland, it is not illegal to possess or consume it any longer so other brands can apparently be purchased by individuals and shipped to the US.

These other brands have higher amounts of Thujone (up to 100mg/kg) and are produced to the same standards that vintage Absinthe was produced. The higher amounts of Thujone are still not enough to harm you but it is enough to give you what is known as the Absinthe Effect.

The Absinthe Effect is a different kind of "high" than what you would get from consuming just alcohol. Many have described it as "lucid drunkenness” or a "clear headed feeling of inebriation". Some say that these effects may be caused by the fact that some of the compounds in absinthe act as stimulants, others as sedatives, overall creating a neutral effect. There may be some truth to that since as you all know one of the brands approved is called Lucid.

How to drink Absinthe:

Absinthe normally has an alcohol content of between 68 and 80 percent and although you can drink it neat is said to be better diluted by a ration from 3:1 to 5:1

Traditionally, absinthe is poured into a glass over which a specially designed slotted spoon is placed. A sugar cube is then deposited in the spoon. Ice-cold water is poured or dripped over the sugar until the drink is diluted 3:1 to 5:1. During this process, the herbs that are not soluble in water, mainly those from anise, fennel and star anise, come out of solution and cloud the drink.

The resulting milky opalescence is called the "louche". The addition of water is important, because due to the overpowering nature of anise, diluting it brings out many of the flavors originally overpowered by the anise. Without dilution it smells and tastes like a strong Licorice.

I now have several brands on order from Europe and should be trying some in a few days.

Acouple have mentioned the Czech made Absinth's and have correctly steered any of you away from it.

Czech Absinthe often called Bohemian style has a high alcohol content but instead of distilling the alcohol they cold mix the product.

It contains little to no anise, fennel or other herbs normally found in traditional absinthe and is often more bitter from chemicals such as absinthine. It is these herbs that cause the "Louche" or cloudiness when water is added. For Czech Absinthe a ritual involving fire is often used that takes this into account. In this ritual, absinth is added to a glass and a sugar cube on a spoon is placed over it. The sugar cube is soaked in absinth then set on fire. The cube is then dropped into the absinth setting it on fire, and water is added until the fire goes out. The crumbling sugar can provide a minor simulation of the louche seen in traditional absinthe. Often the only similarities between Czech and traditional Absinthe are the use of wormwood and a high alcohol content.

I have found an excellent source for Absinthe and information on the product as well. I have also done some legwork in finding ones you may want to order.

Alandia (http://www.alandia.de/) is a good place to start looking for what you want. They also ship to the US and guarantee delivery. See their shipping rates and guarantee at the bottom of this post. Here are a few recommendations.

La Bleue Clandestine (http://www.alandia.de/absinthe/product_info.php/info/p465_ALANDIA-La-Bleue-Clandestine.html) (Absinthe originated in Switzerland and by law must be distilled and either uncolored or naturally colored. Any of the Absinth's you see with the name "Clandestine" are Swiss Absinth's that were made by illegal clandestine distilleries during the 100 year prohibition. After the prohibition was lifted, these distilleries were licensed by the Swiss Government. This is a "Blanche" or clear Absinthe (called La Bleau in Switzerland) which is typical of Swiss Absinth's because clear absinthe was easier to hide if it was not green)

La Bleue Clandestine 72 (http://www.alandia.de/absinthe/product_info.php/info/p407_ALANDIA-La-Bleue-Clandestine-72.html)

ALANDIA Suisse Verte Clandestine (http://www.alandia.de/absinthe/product_info.php/info/p561_ALANDIA-Suisse-Verte-Clandestine.html)
(This is a "Verte" or Green Absinthe. One of the few green Swiss Absinth's)

King of Spirits (http://www.alandia.de/absinthe/product_info.php/info/p313_King-of-Spirits-Set-Limited.html)
(Czech, 100 mg/kg Thujone content, not classic, It is however distilled unlike most Czech Absinthe's, no louche because the herbs were added upon bottling. Absinthe is NOT regulated by the Czech government. Nice for it's presentation box and collectors value)

Absinthe Abtshof 80 (http://www.alandia.de/absinthe/product_info.php/info/p247_Absinthe-Abtshof-80.html)
(German, Classic Resipe)

Absinthe Abtshof (http://www.alandia.de/absinthe/product_info.php/info/p29_Absinthe-Abtshof.html)
(Got to have this one just for the bottle. It too is German in origin. Classic Recipe)

Strong68 (http://www.alandia.de/absinthe/product_info.php/info/p1_ALANDIA-Strong68.html)
(If you are looking for the "Absinthe Effect" Due to the high content of Thujone using a classic recipe, this is it. Also German)

Absinthe Thujon 33 (http://www.alandia.de/absinthe/product_info.php/info/p246_Absinthe-Thujon-33.html)
(High Thujone content, low alcohol content. German)

Recommended by Alandia as their "Absintheurs Best".

La Bleue Clandestine (See above)
Strong 68 (See above)
Absinthe Maison (http://www.alandia.de/absinthe/product_info.php/info/p487_Absinthe-Maison-ALANDIA.html)
(German)
Moulin Vert (http://www.alandia.de/absinthe/product_info.php/info/p357_Absinthe-of-the-Month--Moulin-Vert.html)
(French. Classic French recipe. All French and EU Absinth's are limited by EU law to 10mg/KG of Thujone)
Époque (http://www.alandia.de/absinthe/product_info.php/info/p549_Absinthe-ALANDIA--poque.html)
(French from classic French recipe. All French and EU Absinth's are limited by EU law to 10mg/KG of Thujone)
Gold68 (http://www.alandia.de/absinthe/product_info.php/info/p492_ALANDIA-Gold68.html)
(German)

Vintage Lisboa Absinthe (http://www.alandia.de/absinthe/product_info.php/info/p236_Vintage-Lisboa-Absinthe.html)
(Now if you truly want to try a classic Absinthe this Portuguese Absinthe is a vintage bottle produced before it was banned in 1910 but is a little steep in price at 2000 EUR)


United States:
All orders are shipped by Courier, the delivery is guaranteed, there is NO RISK at all for you the buyer. The shipping time is approx. 7-8 business days. The maximum per box is 3 bottles, larger orders will be splitted in multiple boxes. This shop is only suitable for those who have reached the age of 18, or the legal drinking age of your country of residence. We will not ship to those underage.

1 kg = 38.00 Euro
2 kg = 43.00 Euro
3 kg = 48.00 Euro
4 kg = 53.00 Euro
5 kg = 58.00 Euro
6 kg = 85.00 Euro (split for second box)

Every additional kilo is 5 Euro (a split for a new box is made at the stages 12kg, 18kg, 24kg. Then 20 Euro are added instead of 5 Euro)
One 0.5 liter bottle (Strong68) weights approx. 1kg
One 0.7 liter bottle (La Bleue Clandestine) weights approx. 1.4kg.
The packaging weights approx. 0.4kg.
All orders include our valued ALANDIA delivery guarantee.

OscarV
12-06-2007, 16:19
Good post Tracy, thanks for the information.

Gillman
12-06-2007, 17:02
In October, 2007, the TTB issued a statement on absinthe, I don't know how to upload it here. It is on their website and can be easily found by searching "TTB + absinthe". It refers to the maximum 10 ppm of thujone I mentioned.

Gary

sku
12-06-2007, 18:12
I finally tracked down and tried some Lucid...good stuff. Here's a link to my review: http://recenteats.blogspot.com/2007/12/blind-date-with-green-fairy.html

Jono
12-07-2007, 08:18
Informative article:

http://www.gumbopages.com/food/beverages/absinthe.html

"[Q]uality absinthe, properly distilled, does have a different effect over and above the results of alcohol, though at up to 70%, the effects of the alcohol alone can be considerable. Absinthe's effects, despite popular conception, are not due to the wormwood (Artemisia Absinthia) alone. Absinthe's constituents consist of a very delicate balance of various herbs, most of which contribute in one way or another to its intoxicating effects. [Chemist and absinthe expert] Ted Breaux once explained it that it is a push-me, pull-you effect of the various herbs, as some are of an heightening effect, and others are lowering. The effect on the individual is subjective, and can best be described as a kind of heightened clarity of mind and vision, mildly ponderous and sparkling, and warmed by the effect of the alcohol. This seems to wear off after 20 or 30 minutes, leaving one with an alcohol buzz. 2-3 glasses seems to do the trick. More than that, depending on the proof of the alcohol, will just make you very drunk.

But saying all that, 'secondary effects' seem to be quite subjective. Some have never felt them at all. Some say one brand works for them, others another. Many absintheurs ... have placed absinthe's 'effects' low on their priority list when it comes to judging modern commercial absinthes, preferring to focus on actual herbal constituents, manufacture and historical detail."

Also: http://www.wormwoodsociety.org/

Gillman
12-07-2007, 08:22
I have one of those Polish bitters absinthes mentioned. It is quite bitter indeed. I understand it is used in different ways, one of which is to place a shot in a glass of lager beer. I have never drunk enough absinthe to be able to tell if it has the famous "special" qualities, I use it in Sazeracs only.

Gary

Vange
12-07-2007, 08:48
Tracy, great stuff!!

Add Absinthe Edouard to that list of HIGH quality top notch absinthe!

Jono
12-07-2007, 10:34
How does Absinthe compare to Sambucca in taste? Or, Ouzo?

Vange
12-07-2007, 13:46
Sambuca to me is easier to drink than ouzo (and I am Greek). Its WAY sweeter and less harsh than ouzo, most people in Greece cut their ouzo with water or drink it on the rocks.

Absinthe definitely has some anise taste, but is more herbal than both ouzo and sambuca. Sambuca is by far the sweetest!

Jono
12-07-2007, 15:39
These types of liqours make for a pleasant diversion from the usual...I sip a little Sambucca in the summer once in a while...seems to be more of a warm weather drink. Like may other liqours...they can easily sneak up on you! I would never want to have an overindulgence episode...I love licorice too much to be sick of the smell!

I am half Italian and my mom would add a secret ingredient of a little anise to her sauce...maybe I will try a shot of Sambucca instead!

I will have to find a good Absinthe...it would make a nice but odd addition to the liqour cabinet.

Jono
12-07-2007, 22:56
Bourbon / Absinthe Cocktail

http://nymag.com/daily/food/2007/05/absinthe_feels_so_good_when_it.html

"Billionaire Cocktail: Baker’s Bourbon, Lucid, fresh lemon juice, homemade grenadine."

Tracy Hightower
12-08-2007, 00:18
Good post Tracy, thanks for the information.

My pleasure Oscar.

Tracy Hightower
12-08-2007, 01:31
In October, 2007, the TTB issued a statement on absinthe, I don't know how to upload it here. It is on their website and can be easily found by searching "TTB + absinthe". It refers to the maximum 10 ppm of thujone I mentioned.

Gary

Gary,

You have mentioned the government testing referring to PPM a couple of times. You are correct in that the US Government will limit the amount of Thujone to 10ppm and it will be considered by the US government as Thujone Free.

You may have noticed that I said the government will limit the amount of Thujone to 10 MG/KG which is the same thing as PPM. I am not trying to confuse anyone.

To convert MG/KG (Weight) or MG/L (Volume) to PPM you multiply either times 1.

10PPM (10/1000000)=0.00001

10MG/KG (0.010/1000)=0.00001

Gillman
12-08-2007, 03:35
Thanks Tracy, I assumed that and just wanted to state it as I had read it, it's an interesting statement from TTB in general.

I think probably in the old days absinthe was made in many different ways, as today, and probably some had very little thujone and some had more.

It is a drink with an unusual history and in fact mystique. Thanks again for the information you found.

Gary

Tracy Hightower
12-08-2007, 07:41
My pleasure Gary. Yes it is an interesting statment from the TTB.

Here (http://www.ttb.gov/industry_circulars/archives/2007/2007_05.html) is the link BTW for those that may want to read the TTB Policy statement.

CrispyCritter
12-11-2007, 22:47
What was your dilution rate? I went 3:1 (water:absinthe) last night. It was quite nice. I'd imagine 2:1 would also be good. I wouldn't have wanted it more diluted than it was, I think (though I understand historically 4:1 or so would have even been acceptable...not that I feel compelled to "obey" any unwritten code from days gone by:rolleyes::grin:). The bitterness is pleasant, as in a moderately hopped beer.

My second round was about 3:1, while I guesstimate that my first try was something on the order of 5:1. I like it better at 3:1. I didn't use sugar in either case, but a 5:1 with sugar might have worked better than 5:1 without.

Tracy Hightower
03-02-2008, 11:17
While sharing some Absinthe a friend took this pic and I thought it worth sharing.

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=5368&d=1204481745

Tracy Hightower
03-03-2008, 09:44
Attachement fixed, I think

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=5373&d=1204562631

Vange
03-03-2008, 11:36
is this pic of Lucid?

Tracy Hightower
03-03-2008, 13:50
Actually no, It is a pic of "Abstshof Magdedeburg" Absinthe 66 from Germany.

Vange
03-03-2008, 14:27
Ah ok, I was wondering if the Lucid turns the milky color like it should when water is added. Obviously this absinthe does!

Tracy Hightower
03-03-2008, 16:24
I have not tried the Lucid but I am told it Louche's well.

sku
03-03-2008, 17:52
Here's a pic of the Lucid louche.
http://recenteats.blogspot.com/2007/12/blind-date-with-green-fairy.html

Since trying Lucid, which was good, I have tried one Absinthe I like better, St. George Absinthe from St. George distillery in Alameda, California. Pictures of that one are here:

http://recenteats.blogspot.com/2008/01/i-wish-they-all-could-be-california.html