PDA

View Full Version : Asking For Direction



J.W.
11-06-2007, 10:26
Gentelmen, I am a life long Bourbon drinker but as I get older I find myself wanting to try different things more and more. would someon suggest a good starter single malt. The only scotch I have ever tried is JW Black. Couldn't stand it. maby single malt will be better.$0.0 - $75.00

Gillman
11-06-2007, 10:33
I would suggest Highland Park 12 years old, which is about $50.00 in our market but I've seen it for less in some U.S. outlets. Alternatively, Balvenie Double Barrel, but I prefer Highland Park all things considered.

To me it has almost everything you want in a good malt: roundness, depth, some peat, some honey and fruit, it really has it all.

The late British whisky author, Michael Jackson, famously called it "the greatest all-rounder" in malt whisky, and I agree fully.

In bourbon, I just indicated in another thread that Elijah Craig 12 years old - which probably goes for half of what Highland Park does or not that much more - is in my view the best all-round bourbon currently available today. It is, in bourbon, every bit the equal of Highland Park in my opinion.

Gary

drrich1965
11-06-2007, 11:42
HP 12 is a very, very good whisky, as was mentioned. In some markets you can get the HP18 for fairly cheap- it is outstanding, bit more smokyness than the 12.

A much neglected Sm that many newbies like is Glenfiddich 15, not the 12. The 15 has a wonderful balance of honey, malyness, oak. It is a bit light in body, but a really fine dram.

To get a sense of what a malty whisky is, Glengoyne 10 is a very nice, clean malt. Simple and straight forward, it can provide a nice idea of what malt tasts like, as some whiskies can feature corn or rye.

Should you wish to go for something with more intense pepper favors, Talisker 10 is lovely. The Talisker 175 is a rich malt, complex, a bit more gentle and complex, yet not as "true" to the Talisker name. For a powerfully medicinal malt, Laphroiag 10 is a classic..salt and seawead, yet with a sweet malty middle.

The best deal in single malt is perhaps Dalmore 12. A fine malt that is often around 30bucks, it has an orangy quality, a bit of smoke, also a good all arounder..

Jazzhead
11-06-2007, 13:28
I'd recommend the Macallan 15 year old Fine Oak as an excellent introduction to single malts for a bourbon drinker. Not a peaty one, but subtle, balanced and a bit sweet, and eminently drinkable. Macallans are known for being aged in sherry casks, but the fine oak series uses a combination of sherry and bourbon barrels. The best balance of any SMS I've yet tried.

The Balvenie 15 year old Single Barrel is another good choice. That one is aged in a used bourbon barrel, I believe.

ratcheer
11-06-2007, 15:37
The Balvenie 15 year old Single Barrel is another good choice. That one is aged in a used bourbon barrel, I believe.

I am no expert on single malt scotch, but I will second this one. I have a bottle and it is delicious. It is the only high-end SMS I have ever owned, but it is much better than The Glenfiddich and The Glenlivet I drank, years ago (although those are pretty good, too).

Tim

drrich1965
11-06-2007, 16:14
I am no expert on single malt scotch, but I will second this one. I have a bottle and it is delicious. It is the only high-end SMS I have ever owned, but it is much better than The Glenfiddich and The Glenlivet I drank, years ago (although those are pretty good, too).

Tim


The Balvenie 15 are single barrel, and vary. They are all very good. Best not to refer to all GFs and GL in the same breath- some are average at best, and some your out of this world. Especially some of the older indy Glenlivets- I have one form D and M wine's Afficianado's club that is in my all time top ten. The Mac FO 15 is a good, gentle malt that is made from a mix of bourbon and sherry casks. I really like it a great deal- those who demand all sherry from Macallan are disapointed... On the other hand, the latest 12 year old sherry macallan's are not my cup of tea- very sappy and grappy//

J.W.
11-07-2007, 10:05
Thank you gentlemen for the advice.
"To your good health".

J.W.

Gillman
11-07-2007, 10:08
I know many here would be interested in your reaction based on what you buy.

Gary

ratcheer
11-07-2007, 17:25
Best not to refer to all GFs and GL in the same breath- some are average at best, and some your out of this world. Especially some of the older indy Glenlivets- I have one form D and M wine's Afficianado's club that is in my all time top ten.

Sorry, I am not a scotch guy. I meant to be referring to the standard 12-year olds that you see, everywhere. I should have been more specific.

Tim

drrich1965
11-07-2007, 18:03
Sorry, I am not a scotch guy. I meant to be referring to the standard 12-year olds that you see, everywhere. I should have been more specific.

Tim
No problem- just wanted to make sure to encorage folks to explore some fine whiskies by both distilleries..the new glenlivet nadurra is outstnading..

T47
11-07-2007, 18:43
My first bottle of Whisky besides Bourbon was Mccarthys Oregon Whiskey. I have been told that it is an example of a "Peaty Scotch" but not made in Scotland. One sniff and I knew I was in trouble...the taste just did not agree with me at all. Then based on a recommendations from an SB'r, I tried Aberlour A'bunadh and feel in love with it from the first. I have tried the Aberlour 10, and the Aberlour 12 Double Cask, and I enjoyed them both as well. I guess I have a taste for the "sherried" Scotches. Everyone whom I have introduced to the A'bunadh has enjoyed it very much. I think what surprised me the most was the huge difference in flavors between the bottles of Scotch. The differences are much more dramatic than Bourbons to me. So if you find a Scotch you don't like, don't give up.
The only Bourbon I have trouble with is EC 18. I have pretty much enjoyed every other Bourbon I have tried, some more than others.

:toast:

Sijan
11-08-2007, 18:39
I'm guessing you didn't like the JW Black because of the smoke/spice/peat influence of the Talisker. You should probably aim for Highland, Speyside, Lowland, and Campbeltown malts, and avoid Islay and Island malts, at least for starters. These are generalities, of course.

A good, affordable single malt would be Dalmore 12 year old. It is a Highland single malt and unlikely to be objectionable if you are not a fan of peat. Glenmorangie 10 would be a similar choice, but probably a bit pricier.

I think the Aberlours are also a good recommendation. Sherried malts like Aberlour, Macallan, Glenfarclas are more likely to appeal to bourbon drinkers, I think, due to the sweetness and similar flavors.

Famous Grouse is a good blend that is sweeter than JW Black. And their 10/12 year old blend of malts is very affordable too.

Sijan
11-08-2007, 18:42
Ah, I see the Dalmore 12 was already mentioned, so I second that nomination.




The best deal in single malt is perhaps Dalmore 12. A fine malt that is often around 30bucks, it has an orangy quality, a bit of smoke, also a good all arounder..

mitchshrader
03-04-2008, 16:57
My list of sherried scotches worth spending for..

Macallan 18
Aberlour 16 (15 previously)
Glenfarclas 17
Glen Rothes 91
(not purchased) Balvenie Sherry Wood..

TNbourbon
03-04-2008, 17:05
There are probably as many fabulous single malt Scotch whiskys as there are great bourbons. On the other hand, there are many more Scotch whisky distillers than there are bourbon distillers. And, thus, the problem arises of finding the ones you like. And, the ones you don't (and, there are many!).
Regards this thread, the Highland Park 12yo and Dalmore 12yo, along with different batches of sherried Aberlour A'Bunadh (looks like bourbon!), are the ones for which I have more than a single bottle.

Gov
03-04-2008, 17:34
You being mainly a boubon drinker and not wanting to suggest anything to expensive give a strong look at Glenmorangie 10 and Scapa 14. Both are excellent and have a bourbon flavor to them and very little peat.

Sijan
03-04-2008, 19:42
You being mainly a boubon drinker and not wanting to suggest anything to expensive give a strong look at Glenmorangie 10 and Scapa 14. Both are excellent and have a bourbon flavor to them and very little peat.

I think Glenmorangie 10 would also be a very good choice (I'm not familiar with the Scapa 14). Get whichever is cheaper between it and the Dalmore 12.

boss302
03-05-2008, 00:24
Gentelmen, I am a life long Bourbon drinker but as I get older I find myself wanting to try different things more and more. would someon suggest a good starter single malt. The only scotch I have ever tried is JW Black. Couldn't stand it. maby single malt will be better.$0.0 - $75.00


Good evening, JW!

Keep in mind that a blended scotch, such as Johnnie Walker, is a blend of individual malts. Some single malts will offer characteristics you may like, others will offer characteristics you may not care for. The trick is to figure out what you like, and that is only possible through experimentation.

Let me answer your question with a question-- what characteristics do you like about your favorite bourbon(s)?

boss302
03-05-2008, 00:32
I guess I have a taste for the "sherried" Scotches. Everyone whom I have introduced to the A'bunadh has enjoyed it very much. I think what surprised me the most was the huge difference in flavors between the bottles of Scotch. The differences are much more dramatic than Bourbons to me. So if you find a Scotch you don't like, don't give up.
:toast:


That's a pretty accurate assessment, T47. Based on your preferences, I might recommend you try a few more:

1) Balvenie 12-year Double Wood. If you like Aberlour, you'll LOVE this!

2) Glenmorangie 12-year Sherry Finish (now labeled "La Santa"). The new Glenmorangie 18-year is also finished in Sherry casks. It's always fun to keep a bottle of the 10-year (matured exclusively in American Bourbon casks) handy, so you can pick out the differences in finishes. The 12-year Port finish (now labeled "Quinta Ruban") and the 12-year Madeira Finish (discontinued, but not too hard to find, as of yet) are also worth a try.

3) Dalmore 12-year. I think this is matured in both Bourbon and Sherry casks, but the emphasis is definitely on the Sherry, unlike Glenmorangie, whose emphasis is on the Bourbon.

4) Anything from the MacAllan Fine Oak series. Traditionally, MacAllan matured their whiskies in Sherry casks exclusively. The Fine Oak series adds American Bourbon casks into the mix.

drunkenjayhawk
03-12-2008, 22:34
If you do not like peat and smoke in any way at all... Highland Park might still be not of your liking - it to me one of the best all around malts there is. I have several bottlings of it, love it - but thats me. I would suggest getting a 50 ML of it and checking it out before spending 40-60 on it and hating it. Glenmorangie will be great for you (and me too lol) I really like the Maderia and Port finishes and sherry too. SOme are being phased out and renamed (already mentioned). But you may give the lowland malts a go, no smoke or peat to speak of. Generally very light and almost grassy sweet I would guess. Some of those are Glenkinchie, Auchentoshen to name the two standard bearers so to speak. Then I would get to checking out all the tasting note info here and possibly pick the latest book by the whisky write Mike Jackson who passed on recently unfortunately. I like all kinds of single malt - except those that are truly crap. I like all regions and drink that what region I am in the mood for sometimes of course most often I just get whatever looks the tastyiest at the time lol! I see a bottle of Ardbeg 10 yo taunting me now....!:lol:

Luna56
03-13-2008, 00:09
I gotta put in a recommendation for Dalwhinnie 15. It is a classy though somewhat unassertive SMS (a Highland SM) that is rich and wonderful. Being a Highland whisky it is not too smoky or peaty and is a fantastic way to start.
The Balvenie 15 Single Barrel is really great, too, love it. It's about 100 proof and, being a single barrel, can vary a bit, but every one I've had has been beyond excellent. The slightly higher proof is rather nice, too.
The Dalmore 12 to me is a bit crude (I really notice it on the finish) but tasty.
Once I tried some of the Highland and Speysides I decided to go after a "peat monster" and tried some Lagavulin 16. If you're not accustomed to the medicinal peaty taste it can be a bit intimidating. I didn't like it at first but I gave it a chance to grow on me and, by god, it did. Excellent hooch. I couldn't drink it every day (who am I kidding? Of course I could!) but I am starting to enjoy the peaty stuff more now. The color is very dark and beautiful (food coloring?) and it is a first class pour.
Good luck!
Cheers!

Martian
03-13-2008, 12:32
I recently read that the Glenmorangie 10 yr. is the No. 1 selling single malt in Scotland by the Scots. I've also heard that the Dalwhinnie 15 is excellent. Both are not overwhelmed by smoke and peat like the Islays and other Islands. I enjoy the Islays on occasion. The Ardbeg 10 is fantastic and reasonably priced.

LeoDLion
04-09-2008, 12:36
...
Let me answer your question with a question-- what characteristics do you like about your favorite bourbon(s)?
I was going to ask a similar question in that you said you dont like JWB, so the obvious question is what is it that you dont like in it? Perhaps we can steer you in a whisky that you'll like.

Although liking and disliking a particular sm may change over time. I did not like Laphroiag at first because of the medicinal taste but after I acquired a taste for it, its one of my favorite.