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Sweetmeats
11-20-2007, 14:55
Chuck had mentioned this place awhile back and that thread is now locked. This does look interesting. I'm really enjoying what these Micro Distilleries have to offer so far. For the most part anyway.

Woodstone Creek.

"Don started his distillation enterprise making 5-grain bourbon and single malt whisky which will age while other products make their debut. Other planned products include blended whisky, dark rum, gin and a distilled beer specialty product. The vodka began distribution to Cincinnati state stores this past October. The pair needed the vodka to produce income because the bourbon and whisky may take several more years to mature. Woodstone's website shows the labels of the other spirits: http://www.woodstonecreek.com."

Click the link below for the labels...
http://www2.eos.net/beerwine/spirits.html

cowdery
11-20-2007, 21:20
Do you have any reason to believe this is being sold anywhere? It was my understanding that it is not.

Sweetmeats
11-20-2007, 22:08
I don't know if it is. I'd love to try it though. I've tried a few different Micro Distillery products and some have been good, some have been bad. Hopefully, these will be good.

I'll email the guy and see what he says about distribution.

polyamnesia
11-21-2007, 15:33
looks to be low proof. if available, still worth a shot. i mean, pour.

Sweetmeats
11-21-2007, 16:26
Yeah...nothing but vodka at this time. Oh well. Here's his response.

"Mark,

Woodstone Creek Vodka, is our only spirit currently on the market and is sold in Kentucky (Try The Party Source in Newport, KY thepartysource.com) and Ohio. It just won a Silver Medal with 88 points "Highly Recommended" in The Beverage Testing Institue's 2007 International Rieview of Spirits. I am proud to say that we were ranked higher than some Vodka's from Russia & Poland.

We also have ports containg our distilled grape spirits for sale from our
tasting room.

Thank you for your interest in our products.

Best regards,


Donald R Outterson, Master Distiller"

Sweetmeats
12-06-2007, 11:46
Very interesting...might have to order one of these for the hell of it...

"Jim Nielsen at Jim's Liquors also handles the Monterey Rye Spirits kit for C&C Shine. It is the equivalent of 10 bottles of rye whiskey that the buyer pours into the dark charred white oak, made-in-Arkansas-barrel that comes with the kit. Just let it sit for six months while it develops the color and complexities of flavors desired."

Article here...
http://www.kingcityrustler.com/main.php?story_id=3416&page=36

And ordering info here...
http://www.klwines.com/detail.asp?sku=1032839#moreinfo

cowdery
12-07-2007, 01:43
The following sentences just fill me with confidence in the quality of this California product:

"To make the recipe authentic, the men use Kentucky water that has been duplicated by a Monterey County Lab. To that, corn, yeast and sugar is added for the proper fermentation."

NorCalBoozer
12-07-2007, 09:59
This place is not too far from me...when I get time I'll go down and get a bottle.

Virus_Of_Life
12-07-2007, 11:24
The following sentences just fill me with confidence in the quality of this California product:

"To make the recipe authentic, the men use Kentucky water that has been duplicated by a Monterey County Lab. To that, corn, yeast and sugar is added for the proper fermentation."

:lol: Well, that's California for ya! :slappin:

Gillman
08-25-2008, 12:18
On the other board it was stated today that a tasting of the new Woodstone Creek 5 grain bourbon occurred last Thursday in Covington, I would think at Party Source.

This bourbon, long in development, is produced from a microdistillery in Cincinnati that was an outgrowth of a winery.

According to the other board, it is between 4-8 years old and was distilled and barreled at about 107 proof. For bottling it will be 86 proof according to the colorful label, Woodstone Creek Straight Bourbon Whiskey. (See Woodstone Creek website for a picture).

I don't know if the product is available at Party Source at this time, people in Kentucky near to the Covington outlet might check on availability.

I'd be interested in taste notes if anyone can find some.

Kudos to the distiller for perservering and bringing out (now or soon I would think) a craft pot-distilled bourbon.

Gary

CorvallisCracker
08-25-2008, 12:35
On the other board it was stated today that a tasting of the new Woodstone Creek 5 grain bourbon occurred last Thursday in Covington

Okay, I just spent ten minutes exploring their website and nowhere do I find a listing of the "five grains".

Obviously, corn, but what are the other five? Rye and malted barley are safe bets, but what about the other two? Wheat? Oats? Millet? Sand?

Are malted barley and grain barley considered separate grains?

Gillman
08-25-2008, 14:13
The report incidentally is from Mike Veach quoting sources he names.

It's yellow corn, white corn, rye and two types of malted barley.

Gary

CorvallisCracker
08-25-2008, 15:32
The report incidentally is from Mike Veach quoting sources he names.

It's yellow corn, white corn, rye and two types of malted barley.

Gary

They could drop the rye and one of the malted barleys, add popcorn, sweetcorn and Indian corn and call it "Six Grain".

SBOmarc
08-25-2008, 15:58
Has any distiller ever claimed to use both yellow and white corn? What possible change would the white corn impart?

Gillman
08-25-2008, 16:28
We had a discussion some time ago on the board (as I recall) about corn varieties. There are different types, and apparently dent corn is one of the traditional types. I can't recall at the moment if it is yellow or white.

I recall one poster saying that he ate pancakes made from one of the heirloom varieties and it was a revelation...

Corn types in other words would have influenced whiskey palate, and I don't know why Woodstone elected to use both a yellow and white type, perhaps as a nod to history.

Gary

Gillman
08-26-2008, 07:13
Here is a picture of the first straight bourbon (by my reckoning) to appear from a new company in America since the 1950's:

http://cincinnatilocavore.blogspot.com/2008/08/woodstone-creeks-straight-bourbon.html

Judging by the comments, it seems initial stocks at Party Source sold out and people should call ahead to see if there is more before showing up.

I look forward to the first taste notes.

Judging by the label and also the company's website clearly this is a single barrel bottling, not a mingling of barrels. In reading again what Mike wrote, I think it is clear that the whiskey is somewhere between 4 and 8 years old but NAS on the bottle, so I presume that as the barreles are bottled, they might be e.g., 4 years old, 6, 7, etc., within that range.

This is an important development and I look forward to the first taste notes when they appear.

Gary

cowdery
08-26-2008, 11:38
I try to keep up with what the craft guys are doing, as it's a very exciting time in that field. You can do the same thing just by visiting ADI Forums (http://adiforums.com/) from time to time.

With the enthusiasm of youth, a lot of these guys are willing to try anything, and we and they won't know if they've got anything until there's something to taste. Do different corn varieties make a difference? We think not, simply because the majors all use standard U.S. #2 grade and aren't particular much beyond that, but we really don't know. Nobody knows and speculation, even well-informed, will only get you so far.

"Give me something to taste" should be our battle cry.

Gillman
08-26-2008, 13:31
Well, a new one is in the market now, so let's see what it's like!

Gary

cowdery
08-27-2008, 13:59
I'm looking forward to it.

OscarV
08-28-2008, 19:47
They could drop the rye and one of the malted barleys, add popcorn, sweetcorn and Indian corn and call it "Six Grain".

Yes, this a possibility.

TNbourbon
08-28-2008, 20:46
..."Give me something to taste" should be our battle cry.
I've been with ya for a while now, Chuck!

booniesville
06-11-2009, 19:15
The Micro / Craft Distillery bottles are a lot of fun to track down. I just found the Pioneer Whiskey in Lawrence, KS and the Mountain Moonshine in Harper's Ferry, WV. They are both surprisingly good.

sailor22
06-11-2009, 19:47
Judging by how much is missing from the bottles it looks like the Stranahan's Colorado is the most "appreciated".
I recently had some Stranahan's Grand Mesa and thought it was really good.

booniesville
06-11-2009, 19:55
I really like the Stranahan's. That was the first bottle of non bourbon I went looking for. Flying Dog brewery is now in Frederick, MD and they provided the mash to Stranahan's back in CO. I like the beer and wanted to try the whiskey. I've never seen the Grand Mesa. How is it different from the regular?

OscarV
06-12-2009, 13:44
The Micro / Craft Distillery bottles are a lot of fun to track down. I just found the Pioneer Whiskey in Lawrence, KS and the Mountain Moonshine in Harper's Ferry, WV. They are both surprisingly good.

I included the thumbnail below from your post above.
What is the story on that Weller's Original top shelf right?
I've never heard of it.

DeanSheen
06-12-2009, 14:19
I really like the Stranahan's. That was the first bottle of non bourbon I went looking for. Flying Dog brewery is now in Frederick, MD and they provided the mash to Stranahan's back in CO. I like the beer and wanted to try the whiskey. I've never seen the Grand Mesa. How is it different from the regular?

It was finished in a red wine cask. I think the wine was from Colorado also.

booniesville
06-12-2009, 15:36
The Weller is from my friend's grandparent's basement. He found it and, not beign a big fan of bourbon, gave it to me. I believe it is from the 60's. The cork was rotted so the angels definitley got their share but it was still 3/4 full. I strained the contents and was blown away by the flavor. It is very dense, not woody just concentrated with a syrup texture. The color is very dark and rich. I would say it is a mix between PVW 15 and GTS. It's my favorite bottle in the collection. Here is a then and now picture.

booniesville
06-12-2009, 15:42
Here is a couple more pictures.

booniesville
06-12-2009, 15:45
The tax stamp says the District of Columbia

booniesville
06-13-2009, 18:14
Just picked up the St George out of CA. Not bad. A little sweet but with a nice barley flavor. I expected something similar to a liqueur after reading some of the posts, but found the sweetness did not over power. One of the better craft offerings I've tried. As a side not, I was born about 20 minutes from the distillery:grin:.

cowdery
06-15-2009, 13:16
The current trend among so-called craft distillers is to make malt whiskey, often from wash provided by a micro-brewery. This approach to whiskey-making is promoted by the American Distilling Institute. My criticism is that in trying to create a market for American malt whiskey you are essentially starting from scratch, since making malt whiskey is not part of the American whiskey-making tradition. Do you think there really is a market for American Malt Whiskey?

jburlowski
06-15-2009, 16:36
Do you think there really is a market for American Malt Whiskey?

Yes... a micro one.

booniesville
06-15-2009, 21:45
I would agree that these distillers seem to be releasing products with out any clear vision. I think the most successful products I've tried are the young whiskeys. Most Wanted, Kopper Kettle(no longer made), and Mountain Moonshine have a refreshing light quality (which I realy like) and are at a moderate price point ($12 - $22). Their flavor is different and unique with out trying to be an aged bourbon or scotch. The malt guys make a nice product and are seeing some success(Stranahan's) but is it good enough to buy another bottle? The malts are all $30 + bottles and outside the impulse range. I enjoy tracking down bottles but have only found a few I would buy again.

booniesville
06-15-2009, 21:48
Yes... a micro one.

:slappin:That's hilarious.

p_elliott
06-16-2009, 07:27
I would agree that these distillers seem to be releasing products with out any clear vision. I think the most successful products I've tried are the young whiskeys. Most Wanted, Kopper Kettle(no longer made), and Mountain Moonshine have a refreshing light quality (which I realy like) and are at a moderate price point ($12 - $22). Their flavor is different and unique with out trying to be an aged bourbon or scotch. The malt guys make a nice product and are seeing some success(Stranahan's) but is it good enough to buy another bottle? The malts are all $30 + bottles and outside the impulse range. I enjoy tracking down bottles but have only found a few I would buy again.

You seem to have a little more experience with this what are some of the ones you would buy again?

Josh
06-16-2009, 07:48
Micros, I've had a few, but then again, too few to mention.

By far Virginia Lightning is the best. Just how an unaged corn should be, rich buttery, curvaceous, just the best.

I've also had New Holland Brewery's Zeppelin whiskey. It corresponds to the micro-brewery model mentioned above. It is definately a malt, but I remember a significant amount of corn as well. I got a lot of bittersweet chocolate in the nose and on the palate. It was surprisingly smooth too for an NAS.

But at $60 a bottle, and $8 for a pour in the bar, it's too expensive. Why spend that much when I can get a good-great bourbon or rye for a fraction of the price? To me, that's the biggest obstacle to selling the brewery malt whiskeys. Because they are limited releases, the price becomes more than the average American Whiskey drinker is willing to pay.

ILLfarmboy
06-16-2009, 11:21
Micros, I've had a few, but then again, too few to mention.

By far Virginia Lightning is the best. Just how an unaged corn should be, rich buttery, curvaceous, just the best.

I've also had New Holland Brewery's Zeppelin whiskey. It corresponds to the micro-brewery model mentioned above. It is definately a malt, but I remember a significant amount of corn as well. I got a lot of bittersweet chocolate in the nose and on the palate. It was surprisingly smooth too for an NAS.

But at $60 a bottle, and $8 for a pour in the bar, it's too expensive. Why spend that much when I can get a good-great bourbon or rye for a fraction of the price? To me, that's the biggest obstacle to selling the brewery malt whiskeys. Because they are limited releases, the price becomes more than the average American Whiskey drinker is willing to pay.


I to, like Virginia Lightning. It took a little getting used to, But then again I haven't had the pleasure of sampling white dog and only within the last year have tried blanco tequilas and my one experience with grappa was unpleasant. My experience with unaged spirits was and still is lacking in comparison to many here.

I think John B. is right, the market for an American malt is a "micro" one. I do like Stranahan's very much. I've had several bottles. The market for micro-distilled whiskeys in general is very small, more so in these economic times. I wonder if the micro-distilling movement will even survive the next several years. In boom years I can see how such a trend could lead to a diverse and varied marketplace. But now?

I don't know about anyone else but I haven't bought many bottles of any spirit over $40 in a few months now. For me, anyhow, this is due mostly to a wet Spring, too many rain days results in a lot of short checks. But with the economy worsening, in the future the work just may not be there. That to is figuring in on my whiskey buying habits.

sailor22
06-16-2009, 12:27
I haven't had a lot of experience with a lot of the micro's products - but two that I really like are Stranahans and Anchor's Old Portrero Singe Malt Rye at 90 proof. The current offering. I suppose Anchor is considered a Mico based on current distribution.

If your trying to make a new product work and be profitable it makes sense to cede the "traditional" market to the established players and find something you do well and distinctively that you can hang your reputation on. If that's malt whiskey or corn lightnin then good on em. If it's good tasting american whiskey and I can afford it then it will find a place on my shelf.

booniesville
06-16-2009, 20:13
You seem to have a little more experience with this what are some of the ones you would buy again?

I have tried to buy more Templeton but couldn't find it the last time I was in Iowa. I would also buy Stranahan's but mainly because my wife likes it. Most Wanted whiskey is another because it is cheap and nice in the summer. St. George is a little sweet but excellent after dinner so maybe if I finish the bottle. The others have their place but I don't know if I would replace them.

callmeox
06-16-2009, 20:19
I like the juice that Templeton is selling now and I'm going to have to save some of what I have for when they start producing their own stuff so that I can compare. You can consider them a micro/craft distiller based on intent, but not by any product that they have sold yet.

booniesville
06-16-2009, 20:38
I like the juice that Templeton is selling now and I'm going to have to save some of what I have for when they start producing their own stuff so that I can compare. You can consider them a micro/craft distiller based on intent, but not by any product that they have sold yet.

Are they considered a micro bottler ? I first heard of them in the ADI news letter and bought the story. It was a little disipointing to find out they didn't distill the whiskey. Did they have any input on the mash bill and barrel storage or are they only buying a finished product?

callmeox
06-16-2009, 21:01
In short, they won't talk about the source of the whiskey that they sell. You can find a couple discussions here on SB if you use the forum search and the fact that they're not telling bothers some folks, but not me.

It *is* a bit pricey for an 80 proofer (though the price has dropped a bit recently) but I seem to gravitate toward ryes, including Templeton.

Don't let the bogus back story kill your enjoyment of the product. Much of the lore around American whiskey brands is bunk.

p_elliott
06-17-2009, 09:25
I have tried to buy more Templeton but couldn't find it the last time I was in Iowa. I would also buy Stranahan's but mainly because my wife likes it. Most Wanted whiskey is another because it is cheap and nice in the summer. St. George is a little sweet but excellent after dinner so maybe if I finish the bottle. The others have their place but I don't know if I would replace them.

Templeton is the only rye whiskey they sell in my town.

p_elliott
06-17-2009, 09:36
Are they considered a micro bottler ? I first heard of them in the ADI news letter and bought the story. It was a little disipointing to find out they didn't distill the whiskey. Did they have any input on the mash bill and barrel storage or are they only buying a finished product?

As I understand it they had a distillery in Indiana distill it to their specifications until they could get their distillery up and running. They shipped the product from Indiana to Iowa where it was aged and bottled. I don't know if they have started distilling in Iowa yet Templeton's won't say like it's some big secret no one knows about. Like Bill wasn't having sex with Monica. If you tour their facility you can't go into the distillery. So I doubt they are. This place is only about a 100 miles from me.

cowdery
06-17-2009, 10:03
Templeton is a NDP (non-distiller producer). They have a still and claim to be making something in it, but nothing they have sold to this point comes from that still.

Although no one will confirm this on the record, it seems pretty certain that the source is the former Seagram's distillery in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, now owned by Angostura and known as Lawrenceburg Distillers Indiana (LDI). Again based on piecing together available information, this also appears to be the source of the whiskey being sold by High West Distillery in Utah.

The whiskey made at Lawrenceburg was made for use in various Seagram's blends, both its American blends and Canadian blends (which can contain up to 9% 'other' spirits). The whiskey they used for Templeton is excellent and although I haven't had the High West, I have heard good things about that too.

The "made to their specifications" claim is puffery too. Scott Bush (owner of Templeton) was probably still in high school when that whiskey was distilled. The first bottles of Templeton Rye were released shortly after the company's federal license was granted, i.e., they were a brand new business selling fully-aged whiskey.

I would like to believe that all of these outfits will transition to a housemade product, but the record is not good. Look at Conecuh Ridge, which first appeared in about 2004. They admitted that their Alabama moonshine was being made in Kentucky, but professed an intention to build a distillery in Alabama to make their own. It never happened.

One problem is that it is next to impossible to duplicate an existing whiskey at a completely different distillery. Even the majors have trouble doing it, imagine the obstacles for a small start-up, trying to duplicate a commercially-produced whiskey in a small, micro-distillery operation. More power to them if they can do it, but we have yet to taste the proof.

booniesville
06-17-2009, 16:46
I do like the story on the back of the bottle and don't tell people the "whole" story when they try it. I think Wasmond's has a very nice rye spirit that will be fantastic when aged properly.

miller542
08-05-2009, 20:48
Although no one will confirm this on the record, it seems pretty certain that the source is the former Seagram's distillery in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, now owned by Angostura and known as Lawrenceburg Distillers Indiana (LDI). Again based on piecing together available information, this also appears to be the source of the whiskey being sold by High West Distillery in Utah.

The whiskey made at Lawrenceburg was made for use in various Seagram's blends, both its American blends and Canadian blends (which can contain up to 9% 'other' spirits). The whiskey they used for Templeton is excellent and although I haven't had the High West, I have heard good things about that too.



Funny someone should mention High West. I was just in Park City last week and saw High West mentioned several places and thought I'd look into it. The future building is truly in the shadow of the town lift, on block off historic Main St. - you know, the one you see in all pictures of the Sundance Film Festival. They say they'll be open Summer 2009, but they're going to miss that by a long shot. The building they're in doesn't look like it's been touched in about 40 years, but it is a fenced-off construction site and there is clearly work being done. It really didn't seem like anything was going on inside, but if you watch their video on youtube, the guy states "about three years" and that was as of Dec 07, so almost five now.

I did see bottles of the whiskey in the liquor stores, but didn't buy any. My inner skeptic took over I guess. I though if the building isn't open, even if they are making the stuff inside, where are the rick houses? Where is the bottling plant? Why does the label give a DSP number but also say "bottled at"? There were two products, a blended rye and a straight rye. I don't remember the exact numbers, but both were on the pricey side, with the straight being the more expensive of the two. I usually splurge on vacation, but the price + my doubts about the product had me following my wife over to the tequila section instead.

All that said, it is an interesting venture for lots of reasons. One big question, as Chuck mentioned, will be how well their own juice matches what they admit to be whiskey "imported from back East" My in-laws are moving to Park City, so I'll be able to keep tabs on the place, if only to see if they survive. Additional information posted here is appreciated because their website sure doesn't say much!

cowdery
08-06-2009, 11:46
My skepticism about any of these guys who bring out a product made by someone else--and I won't single out High West here--is whether or not they ever will sell something they actually made, and whether or not they even intend to or, while they may "intend" to, whether or not their business model, especially their capitalization, will ever permit it. Conecuh Ridge Whiskey is the perfect example. It has been around for about seven years now and nothing has changed. Their product is still 100% made in Kentucky by one of the usual suspects. Perhaps an even better example is KBD, which distills nothing and has for 20 years been promising that it would "soon."

But perhaps the most remarkable thing is how many people, even despite knowing the facts, believe them.

kickert
08-06-2009, 12:29
My skepticism about any of these guys who bring out a product made by someone else--and I won't single out High West here--is whether or not they ever will sell something they actually made, and whether or not they even intend to or, while they may "intend" to, whether or not their business model, especially their capitalization, will ever permit it. Conecuh Ridge Whiskey is the perfect example. It has been around for about seven years now and nothing has changed. Their product is still 100% made in Kentucky by one of the usual suspects. Perhaps an even better example is KBD, which distills nothing and has for 20 years been promising that it would "soon."

But perhaps the most remarkable thing is how many people, even despite knowing the facts, believe them.

We regularly have people doing the Bourbon Trail drop in at our distillery. Just last week I had a guy come in who was trying to find the distillery where Rowan's Creek and Noah's Mill was made. I hated to burst his bourbon bubble, but I had to tell him the truth. I ended up sending him to HH.

sailor22
08-06-2009, 13:18
I would have to say that after seeing the two stills at KBD - a large column and a smaller pot - that they have put an awful lot of money into the facilities if they didn't "intend to".

A small start up faces two choices. Either borrow a boatload of $ and bring in a huge team to build the still and infrastructure or do it slowly as profits permit. Choosing the second will most assuredly progress at a much slower pace than you hope for, but with any luck it will help keep you in business in the long run because you will have a much smaller debt load to service.

Good on ya KBD - hoping to see that new make on your site soon. I haven't run out of patience yet - not by a long shot.

cowdery
08-07-2009, 12:25
I wish KBD nothing but the best but, realistically, if it has taken them 20 years to get this far, who is to say it won't take another 20 before they fire it up, and they have for 20 years been saying it would be happening "soon," so that's another consideration.

And there is one more thing. The biggest challenge all whiskey distilleries face is financing their production--not their physical plant but their actual production. The reasons are obvious. Although payment of the federal excise tax is deferred, it is owed (hence a liability) as soon as the whiskey is made. You have annual state taxes on the aging inventory itself. Plus your ability to recover all of your costs and realize your profit is also deferred for four to six years or more, plus you have to keep producing, day in and day out, for all that time with little or no money coming in. If they expect to accomplish that without financing, then they better be building up a huge cash reserve (and maybe they are) along with building their physical plant.

I hope they surprise me, but the odds look pretty long.

jburlowski
08-07-2009, 14:20
I wish KBD nothing but the best but, realistically, if it has taken them 20 years to get this far, who is to say it won't take another 20 before they fire it up, and they have for 20 years been saying it would be happening "soon," so that's another consideration.

And there is one more thing. The biggest challenge all whiskey distilleries face is financing their production--not their physical plant but their actual production. The reasons are obvious. Although payment of the federal excise tax is deferred, it is owed (hence a liability) as soon as the whiskey is made. You have annual state taxes on the aging inventory itself. Plus your ability to recover all of your costs and realize your profit is also deferred for four to six years or more, plus you have to keep producing, day in and day out, for all that time with little or no money coming in. If they expect to accomplish that without financing, then they better be building up a huge cash reserve (and maybe they are) along with building their physical plant.

I hope they surprise me, but the odds look pretty long.

Which is one of the reasons why these guys typically make vodka first... trying to get some cash flow while the good stuff is aging.

Bourbon Geek
08-07-2009, 16:46
I am totally impressed with the guys at KBD. They have never waivered from their initial intent to eventually make their own spirits. I have watched them plug along for years and years, sometimes slow ... sometimes not so slow ... as their money would allow. Lately, I have been showing up quite frequently ... and, barring some major unforseen issue, I believe they will most likely be on stream before the Bourbon Festival this year ... and will have done it without assuming debt in the process.

Way to go guys!!!

Josh
08-07-2009, 18:05
I am totally impressed with the guys at KBD. They have never waivered from their initial intent to eventually make their own spirits. I have watched them plug along for years and years, sometimes slow ... sometimes not so slow ... as their money would allow. Lately, I have been showing up quite frequently ... and, barring some major unforseen issue, I believe they will most likely be on stream before the Bourbon Festival this year ... and will have done it without assuming debt in the process.

Way to go guys!!!

Exciting news Dave! Thanks for sharing it!

BBQ+Bourbon
10-05-2009, 21:12
I'd not considered the impact that the corn used in a mashbill could wield on the finished product but it obviously would have a drastic influence. What's called 'dent' corn is typically dried on the stalk and normally used for livestock feed. Yellow corn is the typical sweet corn seen in grocery stores and white corn has a sweeter, more faint flavor. Being from a farm town, we never ate dent corn. Wish I had.

Clearly, the corn used in the bill would influence the outcome.

Interesting.

ILLfarmboy
10-05-2009, 22:31
I'd not considered the impact that the corn used in a mashbill could wield on the finished product but it obviously would have a drastic influence. What's called 'dent' corn is typically dried on the stalk and normally used for livestock feed. Yellow corn is the typical sweet corn seen in grocery stores and white corn has a sweeter, more faint flavor. Being from a farm town, we never ate dent corn. Wish I had.

Clearly, the corn used in the bill would influence the outcome.

Interesting.

Never ate field corn? You gotta get it when it is on the immature side. If it has already turned more yellow than white it is too mature.

It ain't peaches and cream sweet corn but it is eatable.