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elkypro
12-08-2007, 23:21
Most of the time when someone is reviewing or mentioning a canadian whisky they mention the absence of the letter E in Whisky when it is associated as a canadian blend, but Maker's Mark spells whiskey without the E on their bottle. I know maker's is not made in canada, but i have never known another whiskey, especially one that can call itself a kentucky straight bourbon whiskey, to spell it wihtout an E since it is born in Kentucky. Any ideas on why they do that? Just pondering the question over some rum, holding out until they annouce the next BOTM. thanks
DiGi

Hedmans Brorsa
12-09-2007, 02:28
but i have never known another whiskey, especially one that can call itself a kentucky straight bourbon whiskey, to spell it wihtout an E since it is born in Kentucky. DiGi

Unfortunately, I cannot answer your question. I just like to point out that MM is not alone with this practice. Both Old Forester and Early Times spell theirs without an "e".

Mamba
12-09-2007, 02:30
I've always assumed it was for stylistic purposes (or something).

While we're on the subject of Makers Mark, whats their logo represent?

HighTower
12-09-2007, 03:58
The S is for "Samuels", the family behind the brand, the IV for 4th Generation distiller, and the star for Star Hill Farm.

Scott

squire
12-09-2007, 08:17
Neither does Geo. Dickel though I don't know why. Good question to be asked on a distillery tour but no guarantee the answer will be correct. Maybe they all just used the same printer whose proof dept decided the spelling.

Squire

boone
12-09-2007, 08:26
The S is for "Samuels", the family behind the brand, the IV for 4th Generation distiller, and the star for Star Hill Farm.

Scott

Another big time, misleading, statement...No fault of your's Scott, but when it's told over and over and over again folks tend to think this stuff is true.

Bill Samuels Jr. is not the current distiller ...

Bill Samuels Sr. was not the distiller, even from the get go...

Elmo Beam :grin: was the first Master Distiller for Maker's Mark.

squire
12-09-2007, 08:39
That's correct Scott and I don't want to seem like I'm piling on. Bettye Jo is right to be pointing this out because many people visit this board to get the correct information. Samuels Sr was a marketing guy not a distiller. If you want a distiller you have to hire a Beam.

Squire

NeoTexan
12-09-2007, 15:06
They spell it that way as a tribute to his Scottish roots.

squire
12-09-2007, 16:12
Could well be Dale, lots of Scottish heritage in the distilling history of our Country. I share that descent myself but the stuff my forebears made never wore a printed label.

Squire

cowdery
12-10-2007, 04:46
Two other American brands that use the e-less spelling are Early Times and Old Forester. Both the Samuels and Browns say they use that spelling because of their Scottish heritage.

Dickel was German, so I don't know what happened there.

It's always been a word that people in the U.S. spelled both ways, not necessarily with any method to their madness, just because both spellings were used. The TTB rules use the e-less spelling, even though most dictionaries say whiskey is the preferred spelling in the United States. They give whisky as an alternative spelling.

I think way too much is made of it because, at the end of the day, it's just two different ways of spelling a word, which is not that unusual.

That is not to say I don't have an axe to grind (http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthread.php?t=7956&highlight=trend) on this subject.

JeffRenner
12-17-2007, 19:54
it's just two different ways of spelling a word, which is not that unusual.

That is not to say I don't have an axe to grind (http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthread.php?t=7956&highlight=trend) on this subject.

I don't know if this use of the word axe (also spelled ax) was an inadvertent or deliberate and subtle way of making your point, but I enjoyed it. :)

Jeff

cowdery
12-18-2007, 00:37
I'll never tell.

elkypro
12-20-2007, 17:27
found an interesting articla about Dickel that is relevant to the non-use of the "E" in whiskey ...... http://www.wsmv.com/news/14867441/detail.html

cowdery
12-20-2007, 19:41
The only problem I have with the spelling story is the description of the company as "rural." Cascade Hollow, the distillery with the rural location, was a separate company. Dickel, presumably the entity in question, was located in Nashville.

But deliberately imitating the scotch spelling, yeah, probably that's the reason.

Otherwise the article contained some great information. What seems odd to me is that they feel the No. 8 brand is something they don't want to damage, but they clearly intend the new Cascade Hollow to confuse customers who are just shopping for the black label. Which is it? This is odd because neither product carries an age statement on its label, so they're under no legal obligation not to change the age of the whiskey in the bottle. Although the three year old does require an age statement, they can hide it so 98% of shoppers will never see it.

I guess they are trying to have it both ways. They're upfront with the people who are paying attention while simultaneously trying to slip one past the people who aren't.

TNbourbon
12-20-2007, 20:34
...Although the three year old does require an age statement, they can hide it so 98% of shoppers will never see it...
And they did:

http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showpost.php?p=105941&postcount=9
Curiouser and curiouser.