PDA

View Full Version : adding water......



fogfrog
01-12-2008, 15:44
I don't even drink water with ice so am not likely to add it to bourbon.

I have been adding water, but found myself inconsistent until using a shotglass to measure. I am curious how you all add water to bourbon, say like tonite I a drinking the Weller Antique 107 and adding water. Is there a watering device to add water to straight whiskey? I don't put too much whiskey in the glass, so I need to control a very small amount of water.

jburlowski
01-12-2008, 15:50
If it makes it easier, start with more whiskey in the glass....
:lol:

ACDetroit
01-12-2008, 16:13
I have used a drinking straw and stick it in a glass of water and plug the end with your thumb, you can add drop by drop that way. No measure just by taste. Or try a shot and a half to a half shot of water!

Tony

full_proof
01-12-2008, 22:05
I rarely add water to bourbon, but when I do I fill the cap to a Dasani bottle, or Perrier, or use an eye dropper, if I merely want to "touch" the bourbon, in an attempt to the bring out some of the flavor profile. I have never had much success in this endeavor (I'm probably doing something wrong). If a bourbon requires water, I nearly always relegate it to mixing. If the whisk[e]y is true sewage (e.g. Conecuh Ridge), then I contribute it to the plant dilution for my wife's Paperwhite bulb growing efforts. A win-win accomodation! :lol:

JRomain
01-13-2008, 01:37
I simply dip my finger into a bottle of spring water. Usually add two to three drops. Currently sippin' on some Handy and two drops was just the ticket.

ggilbertva
01-13-2008, 06:43
I usually just slow pour to taste. If you want to be more precise, then use the SB dilution calculator here. (http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthread.php?t=6235) I'll use the calc. when cutting a very high proof whiskey, say the current Stagg.

I prefer my bourbon somewhere between 90 and 110 proof depending on the mashbill. I like wheaters at a higher proof (100-110) and rye at a somewhat lower proof (~90-100). I know I'm probably stating the obvious but for those new to bourbon, only use spring water...not tap when cutting proof.

cowdery
01-13-2008, 20:05
Pappy Van Winkle always said you should pour water in the glass, then add whiskey. That way, he said, you were making a poor thing better rather than making a good thing worse.

TNbourbon
01-13-2008, 20:11
Pappy Van Winkle always said you should pour water in the glass, then add whiskey. That way, he said, you were making a poor thing better rather than making a good thing worse.

I had read that before, and do just that. I see no reason to try to out-think the thinkers ahead of me. To paraphrase a one-time debating point, I'm no Pappy Van Winkle.

dcb
01-14-2008, 08:01
I've only ever added water to stagg and bookers and generally just hold my glass under the tap opened to a trickle for a second. we have great well water so it mixes well with bourbon.

ggilbertva
01-15-2008, 13:24
I've only ever added water to stagg and bookers and generally just hold my glass under the tap opened to a trickle for a second. we have great well water so it mixes well with bourbon.

You are correct. I mentioned Tap water since most are on some sort of utility system. Those of us fortunate to have well water (me included), it's good water always available. I too use my tap since it's clean and pure.

gr8erdane
01-19-2008, 02:30
I use a small pitcher I bought at HH's gift shop just like the ones they use in the tasting room on the rare occasion that I add water. I start with as small amount as my unsteady hand can pour. As Parker pointed out, just a drop or two of water can unlock some flavors you didn't taste before. I'm a believer.

snakster
01-23-2008, 15:43
I procure the finest natural spring water that money can buy. I then wave the unopened bottle over my full glass and put it back in the fridge.

Megawatt
01-24-2008, 11:07
I pour a half-shot of Brita water into a shot glass, and then add it in small increments. Usually 1/8 of a shot is enough, unless it is cask-strength.

CorvallisCracker
03-10-2008, 14:32
I also use Brita-filtered tap water. We change the filter about every three months.

Anything under 110 proof I generally drink neat. However, the GTS I just acquired is 144.8 proof, and sniffing it neat the alcohol dominates all else.

NickAtMartinis
03-10-2008, 17:56
Adding water is fine. Just make sure not to use tap water ----> http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=D8VADOP80&show_article=1

mrt
03-16-2008, 04:16
This may seem strange to many of you, but the only bourbon that makes my stomach burn is Ten High, so far. Yes, it's 80 proof, but I find it definitely harsh, compared to JBW and Bulleit. Now, reading this thread, I'll give it a try by adding a few drops of water. If this doesn't work, I'll have to mix it with coke and serve to friends :)

RM High
03-17-2008, 23:21
Maybe it's because I am a noob, but I add just one ice cube from my refrigerator/freezer. I usually have two to three ounces of bourbon in my glass. It adds just enough to open it up.

JeffRenner
03-21-2008, 06:48
I see no reason to try to out-think the thinkers ahead of me.

I agree, and the thinker ahead of me I emulate is Booker Noe, who was reported to have drunk his barrel strength bourbon half and half with water. I think he called it Kentucky ice tea.

That would put it at about 70 proof, which is about where I like my bourbon most of the time, although I do sometimes drink/sip it a full strength or nearly so. I use reverse osmosis water, same as the bottlers do.

I realize that this is a minority position here. And my five-foot-two, hundred-and-a-few pounds wife, likes her occasional whiskey undiluted, even barrel strength!

Jeff

Brennan77
03-21-2008, 07:52
Pappy Van Winkle always said you should pour water in the glass, then add whiskey. That way, he said, you were making a poor thing better rather than making a good thing worse.

Perhaps attributable to the power of suggestion, I find this method to be very much superior. I've also taken to adding more water to more whiskeys than I used to. I can personally get at more flavors and aromatics with more water.

Sijan
03-21-2008, 08:33
I don't generally add water, but frequently have a glass of water to the side to help clear the palate a bit.