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Jono
02-15-2008, 09:44
http://www.nrdc.org/onearth/06win/frontlines.asp

The above has an article discussing the seasonal effects on bourbon.

Q: Like wines, I assume hot summmers, cold winters etc. affect the bourbon in ways that create distinctions year to year. What is considered the "ideal" seasonal variation for bourbon?

I don't buy into the comment:

"However, the 3-degree Fahrenheit average temperature increase predicted for the state over the next 100 years will mean less variation between winter and summer temperatures. The study's sorry conclusion: "In the future, global warming may affect the weather patterns which are essential in Kentucky for the aging process."

It's yet another reason to cut back on carbon emissions -- your driving may be affecting your drinking."

But is does raise the question of ideal storage.

Jono
02-15-2008, 10:14
Distillers could certainly invest in climate controlled buildings...expensive...but doable.....add heat, humidity for x #months....cool for x # months.

ILLfarmboy
02-15-2008, 10:29
Distillers could certainly invest in climate controlled buildings...expensive...but doable.....add heat, humidity for x #months....cool for x # months.

I think that was already tried as a way of speeding up the aging process and found to be less than Ideal.

And don't it suck that global warming fanaticism has permeated everything?

Jono
02-15-2008, 10:40
If a distiller was concerned over such speculative trends...then moving operations north would be a consideration....not sure where the water would be of similar quality....maybe no place...lets see: Milwaukee -the new bourbon center ....beer and bourbon...hmm.

I am not concerned...KY will always be able to produce superior bourbon.

Jono
02-15-2008, 10:55
Here is an article on Bourbon County, KY water quality:

http://www.uky.edu/KGS/water/library/gwatlas/Bourbon/Waterquality.htm

It actually seems less than "ideal" for some uses....

"In Bourbon County, groundwater is hard to very hard and may contain salt or hydrogen sulfide. The two most common natural constituents that make water in the Bluegrass Region objectionable for domestic use are common salt and hydrogen sulfide. The hydrogen sulfide-bearing water is usually satisfactory for domestic use since the hydrogen sulfide escapes as a gas upon exposure of the water to the air."

But this site says:
http://www.kentuckybarrels.com/KentuckyBourbon.html

"Kentucky spring water, purified as it flows over limestone rock formations, is perfect for Bourbon distilling because it is free of minerals that affect taste. This iron-free limestone water is part of what makes Kentucky Bourbon world-renowned.

cowdery
02-15-2008, 15:08
I got a couple of calls asking me about the effect of global warming on whiskey production. I laughed at them, but they wrote the story anyway.

Recent significant increases in evaporation rates in Kentucky caused some people to blame global warming for that. That's what the cooperages thought it was, because, of course, it turned out to be caused by changes in the way they were making the barrels.

Climate change caused by human agencies is real and potentially disasterous in a lot of ways, but it's not a threat to our whiskey, at least not directly.

Mike R
02-15-2008, 15:10
I don't buy into all of the global warming talk, but even if were to come true, couldn't production remain in KY and storage move north?? Say maybe some place like Holt, MI??????? :grin: :grin: :grin:


Mike
(I do have a pole barn!)

ILLfarmboy
02-15-2008, 18:09
I don't buy into all of the global warming talk, but even if were to come true, couldn't production remain in KY and storage move north?? Say maybe some place like Holt, MI??????? :grin: :grin: :grin:


Mike
(I do have a pole barn!)

Hey, you skipped right over northern IL.

barturtle
02-15-2008, 18:41
Climate change caused by human agencies is real and potentially disasterous in a lot of ways, but it's not a threat to our whiskey, at least not directly.

Actually, and not to change this into an of topic post, but it seems that they use wood from a cooler area due to its tighter grain. Warmer temps would mean the grain of the wood isn't as dense and therefore leakier.