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Gov
03-02-2008, 14:01
Greetings,

I am looking for a bourbon to try. I love scotch and will drink basically and good SM or blend. I like all regions from Scottland. I also like Irish whiskey as well. The only bourbon I tried so far was Markers Mark. I really tried to like it, but did not. Way to syrupy, sickly sweet, to much caramel corn flavor. Anyway, is there an inexpensive complex boubon that is opposite of Makers Mark.

Regards,
Gov

barturtle
03-02-2008, 14:18
Maker's is probably no sweeter than many other bourbons, however they go to the trouble to take steps to eliminate any trace of bitterness, so that leaves it tasting sweeter as there is nothing to balance it out. You'll probably want to move to a bottling with rye as the small grain, instead of wheat like Maker's; or maybe even go straight to a rye whiskey.

Some (mostly) uniformly agreed upon bottlings:

Baker's
Old Grand Dad 114
Knob Creek
Ancient Ancient Age 10yo
Four Roses Small Batch and Single Barrel
Old Forester Signature 100 proof
Evan Williams Single Barrel

for rye:
Wild Turkey
Rittenhouse BIB

spun_cookie
03-02-2008, 14:21
And any of the Wellers

TNbourbon
03-02-2008, 14:28
Almost the first thing to come to mind (for better or worse:skep:) when I first tried Eagle Rare Single Barrel was, "Great bridge bourbon for Scotch drinkers."
Try it.

Gov
03-02-2008, 15:18
How about Buffalo Trace or EC 12. I read those are highly regarded here.

Thanx

Dr. François
03-02-2008, 17:04
Evenin', Govnuh.

I think both BT and EC12 are excellent bourbons at reasonable prices. Both will show off different aspects of bourbon. Neither will be like Maker's Mark. For my money, BT and EC12 are both great bourbons that I purchase often.

NickAtMartinis
03-02-2008, 17:13
Greetings,

I am looking for a bourbon to try. I love scotch and will drink basically and good SM or blend. I like all regions from Scottland. I also like Irish whiskey as well. The only bourbon I tried so far was Markers Mark. I really tried to like it, but did not. Way to syrupy, sickly sweet, to much caramel corn flavor. Anyway, is there an inexpensive complex boubon that is opposite of Makers Mark.

Regards,
Gov


Welcome to the board, Gov.

I would say try some traditional bourbon. Maker's is a wheated bourbon which you found overly sweet. As a result, I'd say stay away from wheated bourbon, i.e., Old Fitzgerald, Van Winkle, Weller, etc.

I'd suggest Wild Turkey Kentucky Spirit or Wild Turkey Rare Breed. Also, definitely try Elijah Craig 12 year old, and OGD BIB or the 114. Give Eagle Rare 10 year old a shot too. All of these bourbons are easy to find in my area but I'm not sure yours. The Turkeys and OGD should be a breeze anywhere. As for the Eagle Rare, I'm not sure.

Regards,

Mark

Vange
03-03-2008, 10:43
I believe if you feel MM is too sweet than many bourbons may not be to your liking. One that I feel is more Islay tasting than bourbon is the Elijah Craig line. Either the 12 or 18 would work. Maybe try there? Others have recommended it as well so I will second that recommendation as our "bourbon bridge".

Gillman
03-03-2008, 12:04
Elijah Craig 18 is an excellent suggestion as are the others. A bourbon that uses rye as the secondary grain in the mash generally will seem less sweet than one which, as Maker's Mark, uses wheat in that capacity. Some of the older bourbons in the KBD range are to be recommended too, e.g., Pure XO.

Still, I agree that overall the palate of bourbon is on the sweet side. Yet, this is relative, since amongst even the rye-recipe bourbons there are bourbons that to my taste are notably dry. Blanton's is in that category, the higher the proof (for dryness) the better.

Sweetness too seems to come off differently in different drinks, or to different people. I think many single malts, especially sherry-aged or finished, are sweeter than many bourbons I know, but it is all down to personal preference..

Gary

NickAtMartinis
03-03-2008, 12:07
Elijah Craig 18 is an excellent suggestion as are the others. A bourbon that uses rye as the secondary grain in the mash generally will seem less sweet than one which, as Maker's Mark, uses wheat in that capacity. Some of the older bourbons in the KBD range are to be recommended too, e.g., Pure XO.

Still, I agree that overall the palate of bourbon is on the sweet side. Yet, this is relative, since amongst even the rye-recipe bourbons there are bourbons that to my taste are notably dry. Blanton's is in that category, the higher the proof (for dryness) the better.

Sweetness too seems to come off differently in different drinks, or to different people. I think many single malts, especially sherry-aged or finished, are sweeter than many bourbons I know, but it is all down to personal preference..

Gary


Gary, great post.

Regarding the Pure Kentucky XO, I grabbed a bad bottle and didn't like it. It was super sweet. But, I heard there are good bottles to be had too.

Anyway, I like your line of thinking with the KBD in that I think the Vintage 17 would be a great recommendation since it's a very high rye recipe, or so it seems to my pallate.

Mark

Gillman
03-03-2008, 12:19
Thanks, Mark. I've found Pure XO quite dry but that brand does seem to vary over time (no bad thing since bourbon is to a large degree a natural product and KBD's are artisanal in style to be sure).

I was thinking also of Noah's Mill which has a notable dryness to my palate.

Gary

Gov
03-03-2008, 13:30
Thanks for the reply's gents. To clarify, I don't mind sweet. I like sherry malts like Aberlour for example and even Bushmills Black Bush. I just didn't like the syrupy taste I got with MM. Maybe I will try an expression from EC. I want to like bourbon because its much easier on my wallet than SMS :lol:
BtW, I drink all my whisk(e)y neat and prefer to drink it that way. So I would probably not mix bourbon at all.

NickAtMartinis
03-03-2008, 13:53
Thanks for the reply's gents. To clarify, I don't mind sweet. I like sherry malts like Aberlour for example and even Bushmills Black Bush. I just didn't like the syrupy taste I got with MM. Maybe I will try an expression from EC. I want to like bourbon because its much easier on my wallet than SMS :lol:
BtW, I drink all my whisk(e)y neat and prefer to drink it that way. So I would probably not mix bourbon at all.


Gottcha, Gov.


Okay, then hit up on some Van Winkles: Old Rip Van Winkle 10 year/107 proof, Van Winkle Family Reserve 12 year (Lot B), Pappy Van Winkle 15, 20 and 23 year olds.

Also, try Weller Antique. It's a wheated bourbon like the Van Winkles.

Then grab yourself some Elijah Craig 12, 18 years as well as Old Grand Dad Bottled In Bond and the 114. Any of the Wild Turkeys are great, especially Wild Turkey Tribute, Kentucky Spirit and Rare Breed.

Try to get your hands on some Vintage 17 and Eagle Rare 10 Single Barrel and the harder to find 17 year. Also, definitely find some George T. Stagg and William Larue Weller (both are from the Buffalo Trace (distillery) Antique Collection) released each fall. The latter two will probably prove difficult to find but you never know.

Best of luck sifting through the many varieties of bourbon. It's going to be fun and, like you said, less of a dent on the wallet.

Mark

mitchshrader
03-03-2008, 20:38
I'm a fan of the Aberlour Sherry Finished, myself, and the Macallan 18... :) so i might have a taste for you.

Rare, these days and worth the chasing. Sazerac Rye, 18.

Pure candy, as fine an American made booze as I know of ever having been created. A few more experienced folks may know of superior quality compared to it, but I was astounded at the pure pleasure in every sip. If you find it, pay the money and enjoy.

I compared it to the Van Winkle 20, head to head, and no contest in my opinion. One was good booze, the other was nectar from heaven. ;)

drunkenjayhawk
03-03-2008, 22:30
As a sms drinker, I have to second the Van Winkle nods here. Its just too darned good to not try.