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GOCOUGS2002
03-13-2008, 13:06
Hello Everyone,

I guess it is time to introduce myself after breaking my silence the other day.

I grew up in Montesano, Washington (State), a small town of 3000 people, which relied heavily on the logging trade. I loved sports and participated in Baseball, Basketball, Cross Country and Track. After graduating I went to community college for two years; I use the term “went” loosely here as I paid for the classes but chose not to show up 70% of the time. I did make the college golf team and was able to play the local courses for fee, which was nice. At the end of those two years I finally woke up and realized that I didn’t want to live with my parents for the rest of my life so I transferred to Washington State University. I arrived on campus a svelte 200 lbs, however I started dating a girl that lived right next to the campus Burger King which happened to be running $1 whopper specials my whole first semester. Burger King + Beer = serious weight gain (This is an important turning part in my life stay with me). I was looking for a way to lose the new found pounds so I started to attend Physical Training each morning with my roommate who had joined ROTC. For the sake of keeping the intro short, the Army Offered me a scholarship and I needed the money so I took it. That was the second best (never say the best if you are married, it could come back to haunt you) decision of my life. I graduated in 2002 with a degree in Political Science / Pre-law and received my commission in the Army as a Medical Service Corps officer. I served 15 months in Korea, spent 7 months in Pennsylvania, 12 months in Iraq (Karbala, Najaf) and I am now stationed at Fort Lewis, Washington with the 62 Medical Brigade. We deployed to Iraq last July for a 15 month tour in Baghdad.

After reading all that you may be wondering, so why did this guy join a Bourbon board? He hasn’t even mentioned it yet! Ladies and Gentleman I’ll be honest with you, I do not know the first thing about bourbon, only tried it a few times and loved it (I can’t even remember the name of what I tried). I figured it was time for me to learn about bourbon if I was going to get serious about it when I returned home. After browsing a few boards I came across this one and liked the layout and discussion of your passion for bourbon; just like the Cigar Board I frequent, I find the depth and breadth of information and the friendships forged discussing our hobbies and interest one of the great benifits of participating in online communities such as this one.

I look forward to learning from all of you.

Jason

OscarV
03-13-2008, 13:21
Hello Everyone,

After browsing a few boards I came across this one and liked the layout and discussion of your passion for bourbon; just like the Cigar Board I frequent, I find the depth and breadth of information and the friendships forged discussing our hobbies and interest one of the great benifits of participating in online communities such as this one.

Jason

I have been here for a couple of years Jason and yes your observation is right on the money.
I was also impressed with the civility of the participants on my initial visits.
Mr. Butler AKA The Boss has done himself proud with this web site.

jeff
03-13-2008, 13:49
Welcome :toast:

d_nelly78
03-13-2008, 14:35
Welcome, I am new too. I just got done with a 14 month stint not too far from you. About 50 miles south of Baghdad. I am a 68S Preventive Medicine Specialist with the 4th BCT 25th ID(ABN) out of Ft Richardson, AK. My tour was not so bad I did a lot of traveling around mostly by helicopter, thank God. Went through Baghdad many times Green Zone, BIAP, Victory, and all the other bases in the area. Actually spent two weeks in Victory doing training. That was a nice break from my FOB. Must say that if you are in Baghdad you have it good. I am sure you know that from your previous deployment. But its hard being away from home and there is always that element of danger lurking in the back of your mind. Plus no bourbon or any other alcohol to be had. Unless you are willing to risk getting it sent to you. Which for me the army is a career and getting busted drinking is not worth it. Plus who wants to be running around buzzed with mortars and rockets coming in. Stay safe and make yourself a laundry list of whiskeys to try when you get home. I wish I had found this forum while I was deployed. I would have been on here all the time. Take it easy and keep your head down. Matt

Sijan
03-13-2008, 16:16
Jason, welcome again! And thanks for introducing yourself.

jburlowski
03-13-2008, 17:13
Welcome and thanks so very much for your service...

What I find great here is the shared passion, and interest, and opinion ,and humor and (occassional) b***shit.

Explore the world of bourbon (it's all American... and it's our version of "drinking the Kool-Aid") and you too may be hooked.

Tennessee Dave
03-13-2008, 17:40
Welcome aboard! Thanks for what you have done for our homeland.:thankyousign:

BourbonJoe
03-13-2008, 18:44
Thanks for your service Jason and welcome to the board.
Joe :usflag:

TNbourbon
03-13-2008, 19:06
We much anticipate your return to home and safety, and wish that we may then personally extend to you our thanks and satisfaction at your selfless service.:toast:

bluesbassdad
03-13-2008, 20:11
Jason,

I appreciate the efforts of our armed forces, and I hope the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan prove to be successful. Thank you for your contribution to that endeavor.

Let's see... checking the calendar here... OK, come September, at least by the latter part of it, here in the USA the leaves will be starting to turn, there'll be a little nip in the air by sundown, and you'll be ready for a not-so-little nip of America's finest alcoholic beverage.

I usually suggest that an inexperienced bourbon drinker stick with low-proof (80-90) mid-shelf bottlings for a while. In your case I make an exception. (It's no crime to add pure water to high-proof bourbon to keep the alcohol from overwhelming the more subtle flavors.)

I humble suggest that you reward yourself by selecting from the following:

Blanton's -- Not my personal favorite but very smooth and subtle.
Rock Hill Farms -- Very high on my list. It's earthy, assertive and full-bodied.
Pappy Van Winkle 15 y/o -- At 107 proof it should assault the palate, but it doesn't. Because wheat is used in place of the more flavorful rye, the result is uncommonly smooth and a little sweet. The sweetness is balanced by the strong oak influence, characteristic of what some might call "over-aged" bourbon.
Wild Turkey Rare Breed -- The proof varies by bottling but will be over 100. To my taste WT RB stands out from other WT bottlings because of a spicy zest, a hint of orange peel and some honey-like floral notes. However, if you happen upon Wild Turkey 12 y/o, no longer distributed in the USA, grab it; you may not find another.The first three of the above may cost $40-55 depending upon where you buy. The WT RB is usually around $35. Even the only grocery store here in outback Arizona carries it. WT 12 y/o sells for whatever the market will bear, possibly near $100.

Whatever your first choice, you'll probably try them all eventually. Enjoy! :toast:

Yours truly,
Dave Morefield

Sijan
03-13-2008, 20:22
Dave's suggestions are very good if you want to splurge a bit (I'd add Van Winkle Lot B 12 year old to his list), although if I was a beginning bourbon drinker, I might start off with something a little more affordable (and easy to find), like Jim Beam Black, and work up from there.

I put together a full list of affordable bourbons and ryes for beginners here:
http://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/showthread.php?t=8142

SBOmarc
03-13-2008, 20:22
Welcome, and I add my thanks for your service. When you get home and find yourself in the mood to travel to this neck of the woods, the bar is open.

GOCOUGS2002
03-13-2008, 21:31
Thank you for the warm welcome and the suggestions. I come home for 18 days of R&R in May, with 7 of those spent in Hawaii. I will select a few bourbons from your suggestions and give the wife a mission...I will let you know what I think!

Jason

GOCOUGS2002
03-13-2008, 21:40
Welcome, I am new too. I just got done with a 14 month stint not too far from you. About 50 miles south of Baghdad. I am a 68S Preventive Medicine Specialist with the 4th BCT 25th ID(ABN) out of Ft Richardson, AK. My tour was not so bad I did a lot of traveling around mostly by helicopter, thank God. Went through Baghdad many times Green Zone, BIAP, Victory, and all the other bases in the area. Actually spent two weeks in Victory doing training. That was a nice break from my FOB. Must say that if you are in Baghdad you have it good. I am sure you know that from your previous deployment. But its hard being away from home and there is always that element of danger lurking in the back of your mind. Plus no bourbon or any other alcohol to be had. Unless you are willing to risk getting it sent to you. Which for me the army is a career and getting busted drinking is not worth it. Plus who wants to be running around buzzed with mortars and rockets coming in. Stay safe and make yourself a laundry list of whiskeys to try when you get home. I wish I had found this forum while I was deployed. I would have been on here all the time. Take it easy and keep your head down. Matt

Matt,

You are correct, I do have it 110% better than the guys out in the Firm bases and I was very impressed with the conditions here after what I experienced last time. I deployed with a BCT last time I was here and had similar experiences from what you wrote above. This time I have a desk job, however I do get to travel through out theater. We provide the Command and Control for all echelon above division health service support. All the Combat Support Hospitals, Vet, Preventative medicine, Combat Stress detachments and Area Support Medical Companies fall under us; makes for an interesting and rewarding mission.

I too plan to make the Army a career and hope to meet you someday.

Jason

GOCOUGS2002
03-18-2008, 11:44
In my introductory post I mentioned that I tried Bourbon but could not remember what it was. I talked to my buddy that gave me my first pour and it was Makers Mark. I remember it was smooth and very flavorful but I really didn't understand how to "experience" Bourbon. After reading some of the tasting notes and the sticky’s on tasting I can't wait to get home and enjoy Bourbon on a new level.

Many thanks to all of you for the information shared on this site.

Jason

JamesW
03-19-2008, 07:17
Welcome to the site and safe journeys ahead. I'd add to what's been said by suggesting you get a few different inexpensive wheated like Weller Antique 107 proof($19) and Weller 12($20+) or especially the Centennial ($30). Pappy Van Winkle 15yr is my favorite but runs around $55 and is tough to locate.

Once again welcome!:toast: