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View Full Version : what >=$30 bottle for a "never really had Bourbon, I like Scotch and Whiskey" guy?



DowntownD
05-04-2008, 00:05
...that, and they like Blue Label, is all I know; I need to pick out/up one bottle for this person - what would you suggest (knowing no more than this)?

barturtle
05-04-2008, 00:17
Eagle Rare Single Barrel.

fishnbowljoe
05-04-2008, 01:04
I agree with Timothy. ERSB. I have said before that no matter how you drink it, it's good. Joe

ratcheer
05-04-2008, 08:07
My two nominations would be Rock Hill Farms and Wild Turkey Kentucky Spirit. These are bold, full-flavored bourbons, my favorite type. If you are more in to smooth, more laid back whiskey, I would recommend Blanton's.

Tim

mozilla
05-04-2008, 08:40
How about some Old Portrero, isn't it a 100% malted barley? Maybe one of the other labels from Anchor Steam distilling....seems like they are very uique in style.

sku
05-04-2008, 10:44
Elijah Craig 18 would be my suggestion. I've always thought of it as a Scotch lover's Bourbon.

sku
05-04-2008, 10:45
How about some Old Portrero, isn't it a 100% malted barley? Maybe one of the other labels from Anchor Steam distilling....seems like they are very uique in style.

OP is 100% malted rye. While I love it, I don't know that I'd recommend it for your typical Scotch drinker. As you say, it's quite unique.

Old Potrero is the only whiskey label from Anchor, although they make a few expressions of it. They also make a very nice Gin under the label Junipero Gin.

drunkenjayhawk
05-04-2008, 10:49
I would go ERSB or EC 18 - if looking to spend more that the 30 dollars. But it may be easier to match up a bourbon if you let us know what kind he prefers scotch wise... Islay? Highland? Speyside? Isles? Lowland? etc

mozilla
05-04-2008, 11:48
OP is 100% malted rye. While I love it, I don't know that I'd recommend it for your typical Scotch drinker. As you say, it's quite unique.

Old Potrero is the only whiskey label from Anchor, although they make a few expressions of it. They also make a very nice Gin under the label Junipero Gin.


Thanks for the save....I was working off memory on that one. Probably not too interesting for a Scotch fan.

How about some Woodford?
It contains pot still whiskey. Might fit for your friend.

Let us know what you chose and how he liked it.

spun_cookie
05-04-2008, 12:32
My scotch buddies like the EC 18, Biday bouebon 2007, baby saz, thomas handy, 17yr saz, makers mark and pappy van winkle (any of them).

I would recomend the pappy 15 or the B-day 2007 first for and scotch drinker.

squire
05-04-2008, 19:03
I always recommend Eligah Craig 12 year old to Scotch Drinkers. It's a very good, quality product and doesn't move them as far away from a familiar flavor profile as some other Bourbons.

Regards,
Squire

Stu
05-04-2008, 19:05
...that, and they like Blue Label, is all I know; I need to pick out/up one bottle for this person - what would you suggest (knowing no more than this)?

As a recent "discoverer" of bourbon who has drank scotch for years, I'd recommend the following because they were the bourbons that first convinced me that Americans can make whiskey. Since then I've come to like many more. EC 18 - it was stated earlier that scotch drinkers like this one, probably because the "earthiness" of it reminds one of the smoke in some scotchs. I liked it when I started and It's still my favorite HH product (but EC12 is gaining on it). Another that I liked the first time I tried it was Henry McKenna. It is way under the $30 limit. Definitely stay away from Old Portrero (which I still don't like) and Woodford (which I can now drink). They may be done in a pot still, but the similarity stops there. Tell your friend not to look for malt and peat in a bourbon, but if you give him EC18 tell him to look for the wood and charcoal characteristics. Another choice would be a good wheater. Wheat is the grain whiskey in scotch and I found them easier to drink when I was learning to like bourbon. Most of the Van Winkles will be beyond your stated limit, but you should be able to find a Weller within your price range, or for sure Maker's Mark (which I liked a lot more when I started drinking bourbon that I do now). The main thing is for him to understand that any similarity between scotch and bourbon is purely coincidental and to try to appreciate the bourbon for it's own sake. That's the way I approached it, and with the help of folks on this forum I am now a bourbon lover. I still like my scotch, but fortunately there is room in my bar for both. Good luck. Let us know what you choose and how he likes it.

Stu

JamesW
05-04-2008, 19:28
How about some Woodford?
It contains pot still whiskey. Might fit for your friend.

Let us know what you chose and how he liked it.

I would agree that the Woodford is a good choice. Being a former scotch drinker I found Woodford to be very much to my liking in the early stages of my Bourbon conversion (and I probably will never touch the stuff againhttp://www.straightbourbon.com/forums/images/icons/icon12.gif )

I gave some of this to other scotch drinking friends and they were thoroughly impressed (one guy even bought a bottle the next day). He found it closest in taste to Dahlwinnie at half the price.

craigthom
05-04-2008, 20:01
"Most of the Van Winkles will be beyond your stated limit,"

Unless there's a typo in the subject, $30 is the LOWER limit. Most of these suggestions are outside the range.

TNbourbon
05-04-2008, 20:04
(OP)...Probably not too interesting for a Scotch fan...

Actually, I would think just the opposite -- you get one of the straight whiskey bottlings, its many-layered flavor may be too interesting for a Scotch fan...
I've thought since first pour that Eagle Rare Single Barrel is a good 'bridge whiskey' from/to Scotch.

DowntownD
05-04-2008, 23:22
"Most of the Van Winkles will be beyond your stated limit,"

Unless there's a typo in the subject, $30 is the LOWER limit. Most of these suggestions are outside the range.

thanks for catching that - it's my fat-fingered mistake.

...bourbons less than or equal to (<=) $30...

great suggestions everyone. I took the easy route and selected the ER 10yr SB since a few of you suggested it and I like it too. I'll report back once they've tried it. thanks...

spun_cookie
05-05-2008, 00:22
Sep up to ~$40 and you will be able to grab about 75&#37; of what was recomended here... (less the woodsford, sorry james... for the price get th B-Day and skip one trip to Mcy Ds) and you will be thrilled.

Stu
05-05-2008, 10:01
Thought I'd put this on last night, but I guess it didn't post. As a long time scotch drinker who recently (within the last two years) discovered bourbon, I'd have to go with Elijah Craig 18, or EC12 if 18 is out of the price range. The "earthiness" wood, and charcoal are reminiscent of the smoke in scotch (but there the similarity stops). Another good bourbon to start a scotch drinker is Basil Hayden. It gets a lot of bad press on this site, but it has characteristics appealing to a lover of light scotch. Oops! I think I just exceeded the price limit. If EC 12 exceeds the price limit, I'd suggest a wheater. The Van Winkles will exceed the limit, but you should be able to find a Weller or Makers Mark within the limit. The grain whisky in scotch blends is wheat, and I found wheaters easier to drink while I was learning to appreciate bourbon. Now I love a rye base as much or more. The main thing is to tell your friend not to expect similarities between scotch and borbon, but to try to appreciate the bourbon for it's own sake. I can now say that I love bourbon, but scotch and bourbon are about as similar as cars and motorcycles. Please stay away from Old Portrero (which I still don't like) or Woodford. They may be made in pot stills but the similarity to scotch stops there.

ratcheer
05-05-2008, 16:20
thanks for catching that - it's my fat-fingered mistake.

...bourbons less than or equal to (<=) $30...



Oh, I was recommending expensive bourbons, because I thought that was what you were interested in. All of the ones I mentioned are around $50, but that is really nothing compared to what scotch drinkers usually have to pay. :crazy:

Tim

drli
05-09-2008, 18:38
Around here I can get the Van Winkle 10y for under $30.. if you can find it, that is. that is what I would bring if they like Scotch, that tastes like Macallans. Or Elmer T. Lee is a very sweet bourbon.

If they like something like Laphroaig, then give up... no Bourbon taste like that.


A Blue Johnnie drinker that I know liked Weller 12Y when I gave it to him as a gift.

JamesW
05-09-2008, 18:56
Sep up to ~$40 and you will be able to grab about 75% of what was recomended here... (less the woodsford, sorry james... for the price get th B-Day and skip one trip to Mcy Ds) and you will be thrilled.

Personally I love that B-day bourbon and I agree it's a good choice but for under $30 I'd suggest Buffalo Trace or ERSB.

btw- The Woodford was my first choice for the scotch drinkers because it's dryer than most bourbons and may be closest to their palate.

drrich1965
05-09-2008, 21:01
I sometimes find the wheaters remind me of single malts malts that feature a malty center (i.e Scapa, the better Glenlivets, Glengoyne), as opposed to sherry/peat focused whiskies. I really like the Weller 12, the Pappy 10 107, and the Weller 107 in that range (all under), perhaps not the Pappy depending upon where you buy.

If you were saying they liked JW Blue, then perhaps the EC12. JW blue has a nose to die for (which I find true of the EC 12), but disapoints a bit on the lack of depth on the palate (for the price, for sure).