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swampguy
06-14-2008, 09:05
I put vodka in the frig. What is wrong with putting bourbon in the frig. ?

Slob
06-14-2008, 09:47
http://www.drinkboy.com/Essays/AProperChill.html

wadewood
06-14-2008, 10:04
If it your bourbon and you like it cold, put it in the frig. I would suggest splitting a bottle and placing half in frig. Then do a side by side, cold vs. room temp. and compare yourself.

ILLfarmboy
06-14-2008, 10:58
http://www.drinkboy.com/Essays/AProperChill.html


I absolutly agree. Having experimented with various whiskeys at different proof points when making Old Fashioneds and Manhattans, to my taste, the water that dilutes the drink is important. Besides, too much alcohol at too low a temp is distasteful. I'm not a rocks drinker. Except for low proof (80) Irish whiskeys. Just my .02

ACDetroit
06-14-2008, 11:08
I agree with all that's been said...except all that refers to making a cocktail, what if he just wants chilled whiskey neat for the summer! Put it in the fridge if you like I keep my current EWBL in the mini fridge by the bar! Then you can sit out side and try to detect the changes in you pour as it return to the wonderful summer temps.

As I've read here many times before! You bought it, it's yours drink it anyway you like!

Cheers!

Tony

Slob
06-14-2008, 11:25
You are perfectly within your rights to enjoy your bourbon as though it were Gatorade.

ACDetroit
06-14-2008, 11:28
I'll sleep so much better now that I have your permission!

Thanks SLOB!

AC

ILLfarmboy
06-14-2008, 14:24
[quote=ACDetroit;126613...As I've read here many times before! You bought it, it's yours drink it anyway you like!

Cheers!

Tony[/quote]

Of course.

I was only giving my opinion and taste impressions of higher proofs at low temps.

camduncan
06-14-2008, 14:25
If Booker can put his bourbon in the fridge (freezer really), who are we to say you can't?

I recently stuck the last of a bottle of Bookers in the freezer to see what it tasted like, and totally enjoyed it. It wasn't better than room temperature, but it wasn't worse either. And it was quite refreshing on a hot summer evening.

gothbat
06-14-2008, 15:10
I've only had cold bourbon twice and both times I didn't really enjoy it. The taste is different and it doesn't have a good mouthfeel to me.

bigtoys
06-14-2008, 17:20
I could definitely see doing it as an alternative to on the rocks. I keep vodka and gin in the freezer for martinis.

OldJack
06-14-2008, 18:55
I'm all for ice-cold hooch if the mood is right. With anything over 90 proof, I go for plenty of rocks. Less than that, the fridge is fine. I even keep a couple of minis of Weller in the freezer for a quick nip.

jburlowski
06-14-2008, 20:04
It's your bourbon... drink it any way you like.

CorvallisCracker
06-16-2008, 11:11
Hmmm...this could be a solution to the problem of having run out of room in my liquor cabinet...

JamesW
06-16-2008, 11:18
I've only had cold bourbon twice and both times I didn't really enjoy it. The taste is different and it doesn't have a good mouthfeel to me.

I agree. While I keep my Vodka in the freezer, my experience with bourbon there was terrible. It seemed to make it very bitter and sour, like all the good flavors were dampened and all the bad was accentuated.

Stu
06-16-2008, 16:41
I like good whisk(e)y neat. The best advice I ever got about temperature was: Bourbon should be enjoyed at room temperature where it was made. Consequently, in the summer I chill my scotch, and on hot days, even my bourbon in the fridge prior to drinking. Not enough to freeze it or even near, but enough to bring my bourbon to a Kentucky fall day or my malt a few degrees cooler.

Gillman
06-16-2008, 19:26
It's an interesting question about temperature and whether to use the fridge.

Although once in a while I use rocks (a little more so lately), 90% of the time I drink it neat at room temperature no matter what season. I've sipped whiskey neat in 90 degree humid heat sometimes, e.g., after a long bike ride (I'll wait 30 minutes to cool down). It's just habit, and doesn't make sense necessarily, but is what I am used to.

There is a logic to drinking some drinks at their "production" temperature, I'm with Stu on that. Top-fermented ales taste best at or close to their fermentation temperatures. I agree too that bourbon perhaps tastes best in the cool fall or the spring (less cool than fall but cooler than the high summer!), and fall and spring were the dumping seasons for bourbon. In Scotland, the drink went well cool if not iced because indeed Scotland is a pretty cold place except there is or was an inversion: to get a warming effect in pre-central heating days they drank it not too cold!

Gary

PhilsFan
06-16-2008, 20:20
My wife and I are going on a road trip soon and may have the opposite problem. We will be traveling with a cooler for soft drinks and some other food items we're taking to our relatives.

I'll also have a few bottles of bourbon in a box in the back. We'll probably stop along the way for up to a couple of hours at a time (maybe even longer). Will the bourbon be okay at temperatures in the 90s for long periods like that, or do I need to put them in baggies and set them in the cooler while we stop?

-Joe

ILLfarmboy
06-16-2008, 20:42
I reckon as long as they aren't full or very nearly full bottles with a cork closure, they'll be fine. Whiskey expands when it gets hot.

As long as they are upright, even if the corks get pushed out a little by the pressurized air space as the whiskey expands, nothing bad can happen.

PhilsFan
06-17-2008, 02:50
I reckon as long as they aren't full or very nearly full bottles with a cork closure, they'll be fine. Whiskey expands when it gets hot.

As long as they are upright, even if the corks get pushed out a little by the pressurized air space as the whiskey expands, nothing bad can happen.

Brad, They're all full bottles, unopened. Most are screw-top, one has a cork closure with wrap-around seal.

-Joe

gothbat
06-17-2008, 05:34
It seemed to make it very bitter and sour, like all the good flavors were dampened and all the bad was accentuated.

It's strange, I had the same impression as you where you say it was like all the good flavors were dampened and the bad were accentuated however, iirc (It's been some time since I've tried it cold.), I thought it was actually too sweet, that combined with the alcohol burn/taste didn't mix well and then there was the temperature of the bourbon itself. I guess it probably comes down to the brand, one was WT101 although I don't recall what the second one I had like that was, possibly JBB. Even though I didn't enjoy it I'll have to someday try some cold wheat recipe bourbon and some cold rye just to see what it's like, I don't have high hopes for either though.

felthove
06-17-2008, 08:29
I think it is pretty well-accepted wisdom that flavors are punctuated when cold. Those of you that have consumed ice cold white wine from the fridge know that the fruit and much of the complexity is muted and starts to come forward as your glass sits in the warmer room. Whether the wine tastes better as these flavors begin to show their face depends on the quality of the wine, its balance, alcohol levels, etc. But if one wants to enjoy all the flavors of a really well made product, room temperature (within reason -- I'm not talking 100 degree rooms!) is where it's at. I cannot help but conclude that the flavor profile of a great bourbon would be muted as well when served from the fridge or freezer.

swampguy
06-17-2008, 14:56
Room temperature for wine is consider to be between 56 and 65 degrees. The 15 min rule is good to follow: for white 15 mins out of the frig and red 15 in the frig. I found this rule to be true and am going to try both with whiskey and see if either applies to whiskey.

Stu
06-18-2008, 07:30
Room temperature for wine is consider to be between 56 and 65 degrees. The 15 min rule is good to follow: for white 15 mins out of the frig and red 15 in the frig. I found this rule to be true and am going to try both with whiskey and see if either applies to whiskey.

Never heard that rule before, but it makes sense. I usually put my whisky in the fridge for 15 min. to 1/2 hr.