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CorvallisCracker
06-30-2008, 12:36
Some local friends and I are planning a tasting of single malts, and trying to put together a selection that covers a range of styles (although there's some overlap already because of the desire to use what some of us have on hand).

So far the lineup is:

1. Rosebank (lowland, 13yo, unpeated, sherry cask aged)

2. Macallan Cask (Speyside, NAS, moderately peaty, sherry cask aged)

3. Aberlour a'bunadh (Speyside, NAS, moderately peaty, sherry cask aged)

4. Highland Park (Orkney, 18yo, moderately peaty, bourbon and sherry cask aged)

5. Laphroaig Quarter Cask (Islay, NAS, very peaty, bourbon cask aged)

The one thing I'd like add to this is something moderately peaty and aged in bourbon barrels. Trying to identify one has been a challenge. The www.whisky-distilleries.info (http://www.whisky-distilleries.info) site has been some help, but cask type is given for only a minority of bottlings.

I'm pretty sure (but not 100% sure) that Glenmorangie 10yo is aged in bourbon casks. It's a little pricier than I like ($52) for the reason that one of the group wants to contribute a bottle but would like to stay below $50.

Any recommendations?

Thanks!

Gov
06-30-2008, 14:57
Some local friends and I are planning a tasting of single malts, and trying to put together a selection that covers a range of styles (although there's some overlap already because of the desire to use what some of us have on hand).

So far the lineup is:

1. Rosebank (lowland, 13yo, unpeated, sherry cask aged)

2. Macallan Cask (Speyside, NAS, moderately peaty, sherry cask aged)

3. Aberlour a'bunadh (Speyside, NAS, moderately peaty, sherry cask aged)

4. Highland Park (Orkney, 18yo, moderately peaty, bourbon and sherry cask aged)

5. Laphroaig Quarter Cask (Islay, NAS, very peaty, bourbon cask aged)

The one thing I'd like add to this is something moderately peaty and aged in bourbon barrels. Trying to identify one has been a challenge. The www.whisky-distilleries.info (http://www.whisky-distilleries.info) site has been some help, but cask type is given for only a minority of bottlings.

I'm pretty sure (but not 100% sure) that Glenmorangie 10yo is aged in bourbon casks. It's a little pricier than I like ($52) for the reason that one of the group wants to contribute a bottle but would like to stay below $50.

Any recommendations?

Thanks!

Glenmo is aged in bourbon casks exclusively, no peat though. Scapa 14 you might try also, but really no peak. Maybe Coal lla, more peat but not over peaky.

drrich1965
06-30-2008, 17:30
Some local friends and I are planning a tasting of single malts, and trying to put together a selection that covers a range of styles (although there's some overlap already because of the desire to use what some of us have on hand).

So far the lineup is:

1. Rosebank (lowland, 13yo, unpeated, sherry cask aged)

2. Macallan Cask (Speyside, NAS, moderately peaty, sherry cask aged)

3. Aberlour a'bunadh (Speyside, NAS, moderately peaty, sherry cask aged)

4. Highland Park (Orkney, 18yo, moderately peaty, bourbon and sherry cask aged)

5. Laphroaig Quarter Cask (Islay, NAS, very peaty, bourbon cask aged)

The one thing I'd like add to this is something moderately peaty and aged in bourbon barrels. Trying to identify one has been a challenge. The www.whisky-distilleries.info (http://www.whisky-distilleries.info) site has been some help, but cask type is given for only a minority of bottlings.

I'm pretty sure (but not 100% sure) that Glenmorangie 10yo is aged in bourbon casks. It's a little pricier than I like ($52) for the reason that one of the group wants to contribute a bottle but would like to stay below $50.

Any recommendations?

Thanks!

Not to be picky, but your description of peating levels may be in dispute. For example, I do not believe Rosebank is unpeated, but very low. Also, I would say that the Mac and Alerlour are on the low peating side. Of course, the level of peating is actaully both objective and subjective. However, if you taste those two next to a Glen Garioch, which has a bit more of a peated quality for a highland malt, you can taste the difference. HP18, perhaps between mild and moderate. All good choices, however, you picked very well. For a moderate peating level, I would choise Caol Ila 12, or Talisker 10. Caol Ila has a wonderful olive like quality, Talisker a bit of a white pepper to it. I think of of those might be a nice contrast, and "step up" to and before the Laphroig (which is a great choice, but I would have choosen Ardbeg 15- a bit easier for newcomes to peat then the Laphy, I think).

I also not a big fan of the Mac Cask Strenght. You already have a cask strenght Sherry bomb in the Aberlour abundah. I would with something that has a bit more of a malty center, for contrast. I like the Glenfiddich 15- much better than the 12. A great honeyed, malty drink. Glenlivet Naddura is also a good choose for a malty center. If you want a malt monster, for real contrast, any of the Glengyones would be great (and it is one of the truely unpeated malts).

Have a blaste. FYI, I will be moving to the Tacoma area soon, so anyother malt lover in the Pacific North West.

TroyM
06-30-2008, 17:32
What about one of the following?

Talisker 10 or 18
Ardmore Traditional Cask (peated highland)
Longrow 10 or CV
A Springbank as a change up

Maybe an unfinished bruichladdich would be good too ie 10 or 12

TroyM
06-30-2008, 17:36
I would have choosen Ardbeg 15- a bit easier for newcomes to peat then the Laphy, I think).

.

Can you provide me with the details of Ardbeg 15? Ive never seen it before

TroyM
06-30-2008, 17:49
cask aged)



The one thing I'd like add to this is something moderately peaty and aged in bourbon barrels. Trying to identify one has been a challenge.
Thanks!

More often than not a scotch that is yellow, gold or dessert wine coloured is from a bourbon cask. Whilst a port or sherry cask scotch will be amber, reddish or weak tea coloured. Most peated malt is from Islay though there a few exceptions.

CorvallisCracker
06-30-2008, 18:29
Not to be picky

Oh, go ahead.


but your description of peating levels may be in dispute.

"may"?


For example, I do not believe Rosebank is unpeated, but very low.

I disagree. I've never encountered a peated lowland Scotch. Plus, I am very sensitive to peat (which is why your "light peat" is my "moderate peat"). If the Rosebank had any, I'd know it.


Also, I would say that the Mac and Alerlour are on the low peating side. Of course, the level of peating is actaully both objective and subjective.

My point exactly.


However, if you taste those two next to a Glen Garioch,

Not available in Oregon.


which has a bit more of a peated quality for a highland malt, you can taste the difference. HP18, perhaps between mild and moderate. All good choices, however, you picked very well. For a moderate peating level, I would choise Caol Ila 12,

Leaning toward that one.


or Talisker 10.

Not available in Oregon.


Caol Ila has a wonderful olive like quality, Talisker a bit of a white pepper to it. I think of of those might be a nice contrast, and "step up" to and before the Laphroig (which is a great choice, but I would have choosen Ardbeg 15- a bit easier for newcomes to peat then the Laphy, I think).

The only Ardbeg available here is the 10 and the Uigeadail.


I also not a big fan of the Mac Cask Strenght. You already have a cask strenght Sherry bomb in the Aberlour abundah.

The guy hosting the tasting is offering the Mac. It's the only SMS he has. I don't want to tell him "no". Besides, I want to taste this side-by-side with the a'bunadh.


I would with something that has a bit more of a malty center, for contrast. I like the Glenfiddich 15- much better than the 12. A great honeyed, malty drink.

I'm guessing the 15 is the one listed on the OLCC list as the "Solera Reserve", $5 more than the 12yo.


Glenlivet Naddura is also a good choose for a malty center.

That one we can get.


If you want a malt monster, for real contrast, any of the Glengyones would be great (and it is one of the truely unpeated malts).

"Glengyones"? Are you sure you spelled that right?


Have a blaste. FYI, I will be moving to the Tacoma area soon, so anyother malt lover in the Pacific North West.

Washington, like Oregon, is a "controlled" state. Boy, are you in for a shock.

But thanks for all the info. Next time I'm out of state, I'll look for some of these.

CorvallisCracker
07-01-2008, 10:20
More often than not a scotch that is yellow, gold or dessert wine coloured is from a bourbon cask. Whilst a port or sherry cask scotch will be amber, reddish or weak tea coloured.

That sounds reasonable. Thanks.

CorvallisCracker
07-01-2008, 10:28
If you want a malt monster, for real contrast, any of the Glengyones would be great (and it is one of the truely unpeated malts).


"Glengyones"? Are you sure you spelled that right?

Glengoyne.

Sounds interesting. Wish we could get it here in OR.

cowdery
07-01-2008, 14:34
Virtually all scotches are aged in bourbon barrels. The ones that call it out, I believe, are first refill. A more common practice is for first refill to be reserved for grain whiskey, then the single malts use the barrel after that. When the producer wants more bourbon character in a single, it uses a first refill bourbon cask. Those are the ones that promote their use of bourbon casks.

CorvallisCracker
07-07-2008, 23:04
If you want a malt monster, for real contrast, any of the Glengyones[sic] would be great (and it is one of the truely unpeated malts).

Encountered a bottle of the 17yo Glengoyne today, for $65. I note that Jim Murray gives the 10yo a 90, the 12yo an 88, and the 17yo an 86.

Your thoughts?

boss302
07-08-2008, 11:17
Virtually all scotches are aged in bourbon barrels. The ones that call it out, I believe, are first refill. A more common practice is for first refill to be reserved for grain whiskey, then the single malts use the barrel after that. When the producer wants more bourbon character in a single, it uses a first refill bourbon cask. Those are the ones that promote their use of bourbon casks.

Actually, a portion of Glenmorangie's American Oak casks are new. These batches are then married to batches matured in refill casks.

Glenfiddich does something similar with their 15-year Solera Reserve.

CorvallisCracker
07-08-2008, 11:54
Actually, a portion of Glenmorangie's American Oak casks are new. These batches are then married to batches matured in refill casks.

Glen Moray (owned by Glenmorangie) has a special bottling, the "Mountain Oak Malt (http://www.glenmoray.com/tasting-notes/tasting-notes-1991-dmc.php)", which is aged entirely in new charred oak barrels.


I believe I read somewhere that the "Mountain" part refers to the fact that the wood originated in the Ozarks.

drrich1965
07-09-2008, 07:51
Encountered a bottle of the 17yo Glengoyne today, for $65. I note that Jim Murray gives the 10yo a 90, the 12yo an 88, and the 17yo an 86.

Your thoughts?

I don't always agree with JM, but do here. The ten is far better. Glengoyne is a light spirit, and does not age that well. The ten is light, malty, about as clean in its backed cookie/cereal quality as any malt I have had. The 17 takes on a great deal of oak, and already begins to lose its distillery character. I have not had the 12.

CorvallisCracker
07-09-2008, 10:40
I don't always agree with JM, but do here. The ten is far better. Glengoyne is a light spirit, and does not age that well. The ten is light, malty, about as clean in its backed cookie/cereal quality as any malt I have had. The 17 takes on a great deal of oak, and already begins to lose its distillery character.

Dang. Well, next time I'm there I'll ask the proprietor if he can order some 12yo. He may not want to though, because the way things work here in Oregon he'd have to order a case (possibly two).

Thanks for the reply.

TroyM
07-09-2008, 17:13
Keep an eye out for the cask strength Glenmorangie Astar. Its a new release and as yet I havent had a chance to taste it but have only heard good things about it.

CorvallisCracker
07-09-2008, 17:18
Dang. Well, next time I'm there I'll ask the proprietor if he can order some 12yo.

Actually I meant the 10yo.

Wish I'd caught that when I could still edit it.

Megawatt
07-10-2008, 06:09
Virtually all scotches are aged in bourbon barrels. The ones that call it out, I believe, are first refill. A more common practice is for first refill to be reserved for grain whiskey, then the single malts use the barrel after that. When the producer wants more bourbon character in a single, it uses a first refill bourbon cask. Those are the ones that promote their use of bourbon casks.

If you think about it, once a barrel has held bourbon it is not a bourbon barrel at all, but an ex-bourbon barrel. Bourbon seems to get a lot of its character from first-fill barrels, so strictly speaking a new oak cask could be called a bourbon barrel, since those are the only barrels used for bourbon, and the ones which impart the most bourbon-like flavours to a Scotch.

I've also noticed that any time a distiller mentions "traditional oak casks", they are referring to ex-bourbon barrels.

TroyM
07-11-2008, 01:12
The Glenmorangie Astar uses Jack Daniels casks. Guess we cant call it a bourbon barrel then? LOL