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ratcheer
07-13-2008, 17:01
I have really been enjoying the old standard drink recipes, lately. Today it was a gin rickey. Very simple and very satisfying. Cold and effervescent, the flavor of the gin really shines through. No sugar!


1 1/2 oz gin (I used Beefeaters)
Juice of 1/2 lime, fresh squeezed
Club soda (I used Perrier mineral water)
Fill a highball glass with ice cubes. Squeeze in the lime. Pour the gin. Fill with sparkling water.

Tim

Rughi
07-13-2008, 22:41
I have really been enjoying the old standard drink recipes, lately. Today it was a gin rickey.

What, and flirt with malaria???
You need that quinine of a gin and tonic to protect your constitution in this summer heat, Sir :)

Actually, your post opened my eyes, as I had always thought of a rickey as just a sour with lime instead of lemon. Not so! A rickey, as you and Gary Regan concur, is actually a highball. But that didn't deter me from my rye sour.

I like Pikesville Rye best for this (assuming the Fleishmann's is not to be had) for it's minimal oak and soot, lower oiliness than WT, and that it doesn't have the grassiness of the Beam Rye.

* 1 1/2 oz rye (I used Pikesville Rye)
* Juice of 1/2 lemon, fresh squeezed
* 2 1/2 tsp sugar (I'm not getting full utilization, so I bump it up)
Rim an old fashioned glass with lemon. Shake vigorously in penguin (picture cover art of Cars' "Shake it Up" album). Strain into glass. Add maraschino cherry, if for the lady of the house.

Roger

Gillman
07-14-2008, 08:46
A rickey, based on my reading, is any spirit (long drink) and no sugar. Apparently it was named after a U.S. senator in the pre-Pro days. However as we so often see, sugar is optional and finds its way into some recipes for this drink and many others.

Note too that most spirits of the late 1800's, at least the good ones, were probably somewhat sweet (the ubiquitous Old Tom gin was a sweetened gin, aged bourbon from those first growth barrels was sweetish, ditto malt whiskies and the good blends, cognac, etc.). So for some rickeys initially, I infer that sugar was probably felt unnecessary although of course some people have always liked a dry drink.

I've found that any sugar, even packet-type sugar used for coffee, will dissolve 100% if you swirl the glass long enough (2-3 minutes), even without adding soda as a diluent and regardless of the temperature of the spirit.

Gary

ratcheer
07-14-2008, 15:47
I have a question based on my oft-repeated complaint that I live in an ABC state with limited product availability (except for scotches and vodkas, of which wide choices are available - and I drink neither). The only straight rye available is Jim Beam. Based on many comments I have read, I don't even care about trying it.

So, what would be the best substitute for straight rye in mixed drinks? I am thinking along the lines of a good American blend, such as Seagram's 7, or a decent Canadian whiskey, e.g., Canadian Club. Which of these would be more suitable for drinks where bourbon is overpowering (in strong flavors, not alcohol)?

Note that if you want to start naming fancy Canadians, I probably won't be able to obtain those, either.

Thanks,
Tim

Gillman
07-14-2008, 16:20
Seagram 7 is still very good but consider also one of the quality HH blends mentioned by Bettye Jo in vbt #122, e.g., Kentucky Deluxe. At 70-80% pure bourbon (rest GNS) you will have the perfect balance for a mixed drink.

Just curious: why not scotch?

Gary

ratcheer
07-15-2008, 17:09
Seagram 7 is still very good but consider also one of the quality HH blends mentioned by Bettye Jo in vbt #122, e.g., Kentucky Deluxe. At 70-80% pure bourbon (rest GNS) you will have the perfect balance for a mixed drink.

Just curious: why not scotch?

Gary

Oh, I drink a tiny bit of scotch, but not enough that the store's stock affects me one way or another. I have bought exactly one bottle of scotch in the past 20 years or so - The Balvenie 15-year old single barrel. It is still over half full and, when I do drink it, I enjoy it very much. Also, I will occasionally drink free scotch at a party. ;)

They have at least one of those blends, I think it is just called "Heaven Hill". I will look at it more closely, next time.

Tim

Gillman
07-15-2008, 21:32
Tim, the lighter scotches go very well with ginger ale, it is a staple drink in the U.K.

Gary

robbyvirus
07-15-2008, 23:40
The gin rickey is one of my favorite drinks, especailly in the summer. Simple yet delicious. I sometimes substitute 7-Up for the club soda if I'm in the mood for something a bit sweeter.

smokinjoe
07-16-2008, 06:31
Tim, thanks for the idea on this. I've tried a couple of them over the last couple of days and am really enjoying them. Like Robby said, they are refreshing on a hot day.

:toast:

JOE