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  1. #31
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    Re: A question for craft distillers? Where's the craft?

    In your market, I'd advise if available Fuller London Porter, which has a deeper, slightly sweeter taste than Taddy Porter (which has an acidic edge - a trademark of some porter styles). Whether in can or bottle, it is very reliable.

    There may be, too, craft U.S. stouts or porters which may please.

    I just bought a smoked oatmeal stout in our market here, some of this may come with me to Gazebo.

    Gary

  2. #32
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    Re: A question for craft distillers? Where's the craft?

    I don't recall seeing anything like Fuller London Porter. Last winter, I bought a case of the Sam Adams Winter Sampler, which included some porter that was pretty good.

    A lot of people seem to be unaware that stout is porter. It simply means, you guessed it, strong porter. Somewhere along the years, people stopped calling it stout porter, shortening it to just "stout". And now, most people have no idea that they are the same thing. In fact, many porters are stouter than some stouts.

    Tim
    Self-Styled Whisky Connoisseur

  3. #33
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    Re: A question for craft distillers? Where's the craft?

    That's right. Porter and stout are closely related styles. Porter came first, and migrated to Ireland, whence the stout variation emerged (characterised too, later, by use of some darkened unmalted barley). I might bring some Fuller's London Porter to Gazebo, Tim if you are coming this year, I'll make certain of it.

    Gary

  4. #34
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    Re: A question for craft distillers? Where's the craft?

    I checked online about Orange Brewery in Pimlico, London. It still exists but does not brew any longer, all the beers are brought in, so it would function then as any other London pub. The beers described sound first rate, though, e.g., Fuller's.

    Gary

  5. #35
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    Re: A question for craft distillers? Where's the craft?

    True enough, today's stout had its beginnings as a "stout porter", but the difference, at least today, is in the use of roasted barley in the stout. It lends that coffee-like roastiness to the profile of a stout, whereas today's porters typically use a good percentage of chocolate malt to achieve the dark color and chocolate-like flavors.
    Simplicity is the essence of universality - MK Ghandi

  6. #36
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    Re: A question for craft distillers? Where's the craft?

    Yes, this is really the keynote to Irish (bitter) stout I think. It gives a dryness and perhaps an oily note - like unmalted cereals do in a distilled ferment - which sets off against the sweetness of barley malt. The Irish hopping is interesting too, which is not an aromatic hoppiness like in English bitter or American pale ale but is simply a bitter hop resin on the palate.

    However, other forms of stout survived in England. The term stout itself was used in England before porter was invented in London, fans of Jackson will recall his citation of the pre-porter impecunious poet who dreamed, "a pint of stout to surprise the muse" (i.e., jump-start the poetic imagination). At the time, stout meant any strong beer.

    Surviving English stout styles include Imperial Russian Stout and the mild sweet milk stout. Also, in the north of England, oatmeal stout. None of these uses I believe roasted (unmalted) barley, which is an Irish trait and is said to derive from a time when a tax on malt made brewers look for different ways to save money.

    Guinness Stout on draught is still a good drink and it can be in the can or bottle too. It needs to be very fresh and drunk only half-chilled to see it at its best. I even like the locally made "essence" Guinness although perhaps it is less earthy and rich than 30 years ago.

    For the Gazebo, I'm now thinking I will bring the spirits mentioned earlier but not the beer (and I have very limited space). I might in lieu of the beer get some Champagne and some Guinness and offer people Black Velvets, 50/50 or either in its own. A festive touch for what will prove to be a great SB event I think.

    Gary
    Last edited by Gillman; 09-15-2008 at 04:46.

 

 

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