Welcome to the Straightbourbon.com Forums.
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24
  1. #1
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    9,186

    Dr. McGillicuddy Hot Cinnamon Fireball

    This is sub-titled, "Flavoured Corn Whisky".

    The label also states, produced and bottled in Canada for Sazerac Company, Inc., New Orleans, LA. I take it this is a U.S. product, made under license or under some other arrangement in Canada, i.e., that the corn whisky base is distilled here.

    I bought this to see if I could taste the corn whisky and if I could whether it resembles corn whisky in the U.S. I could not taste any whisky, however: the taste is full-on cinnamon, sugar and red pepper. The taste is good though, clean and pure of the flavours mentioned, but I am not sure what role the whisky plays. If the base does taste of corn as U.S. corn whiskies do, the flavourings cover it over, at least to my taste. Maybe the idea is that the corn oils provide body and a "vehicle" for the flavors mentioned.

    It is too sweet for me, however mixed 50/50 with Fighting Cock (which has a slight corn taste), it was very good: plenty sweet enough but with a boosted ABV and detectable whisky flavours.

    Gary
    Last edited by Gillman; 10-05-2008 at 13:03.

  2. #2
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    12,655

    Re: Dr. McGillicuddy Hot Cinnamon Fireball

    This is all a bit of a mystery to me. The word "schnapps" appears nowhere in the standards of identity and I've always thought of schnapps, legally, as liqueurs. There's a web site, but it has on it very little information. It mentions a Peach Schnapps that it says is only available in Canada, but there is no mention of the Hot Cinnamon Fireball. There is also no "mandatory statement," which is supposed to be standard on all spirits advertising, that states the official "type" of spirit it is, the proof, and the producer's principal place of business. I combed the web site and couldn't find anything of the kind, nor is the web site age screened, which is a violation of DISCUS on-line marketing guidelines. The idea that this product is a "flavored corn whiskey" is surely news to me. Strange.

  3. #3
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    9,186

    Re: Dr. McGillicuddy Hot Cinnamon Fireball

    There is no reference on this label to schnapps. "Ingredients" listed are "whisky, natural flavours".

    In Canada, whisky is anything distilled from a grain mash and aged for a time (3 years in wood applies I think to Canadian whisky or rye whisky), but why would they state "Flavoured Corn Whisky"? The statement has the Canadian "u" in the word.

    As I recall from the law, corn whisky is not defined (whereas rye whisky is, it is analagous to Canadian whisky). Maybe this is high-proof base spirit made from corn aged enough time (I forget what that is) to be whisky, with the added flavours.

    Gary
    Last edited by Gillman; 10-06-2008 at 16:20.

  4. #4
    Bourbonian of the Year 2010 and Guru
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Kentucky!
    Posts
    4,750

    Re: Dr. McGillicuddy Hot Cinnamon Fireball

    The class and type according to their label application is #161 Canadian Whisky Foreign Bottled. The document then further says Cinnamon Flavored Whisky. Some of the other flavors list themselves as being Schnapps (Codes of 600-699 are Liqueur and Schnapps specific.
    2010 Bourbonian of the Year

    As long as you have good whiskey you're not "unemployed", you're "Funemployed!!!"

    I'm no Pappyophile

  5. #5
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    12,655

    Re: Dr. McGillicuddy Hot Cinnamon Fireball

    It sounds like a product created for the Canadian market and I would not assume that "corn whiskey" means the same thing there as it means here, nor would I assume that this corn whiskey was made here and flavored there.

    It's enough for me to keep up with the Americans, let alone those nutty Canadians.

  6. #6
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    9,186

    Re: Dr. McGillicuddy Hot Cinnamon Fireball

    Not so nutty when you taste the new Wiser's Small Batch!

    It could be that this is only for our market, yes.

    Still though, I can't figure out why the name whisky is modified with the adjective corn. One possibility is that the drink was intended to be based on a U.S.-type corn whiskey. And it may be, but if so I can't taste it.

    Gary

  7. #7
    Bourbonian of the Year 2010 and Guru
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Kentucky!
    Posts
    4,750

    Re: Dr. McGillicuddy Hot Cinnamon Fireball

    I wonder if they are attempting to say that it is a "Bourbon Style" whiskey, but with "Bourbon" being "a distinctive product of the US" they can't...just a way to say it's not rye or malt or neutral grain based.
    2010 Bourbonian of the Year

    As long as you have good whiskey you're not "unemployed", you're "Funemployed!!!"

    I'm no Pappyophile

  8. #8
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    9,186

    Re: Dr. McGillicuddy Hot Cinnamon Fireball

    I don't think so Timothy simply because there is no hint of Bourbon-type flavour in it. Perhaps it was felt that on a folksy-type label, the name "corn whisky" has an old-fashioned ring. I still think that they might have made a U.S.-style corn whiskey for this, to get the extra body and smoothness the corn oils would provide, but effaced the taste with the big sugared cinnamon red hots taste. It's actually excellent with a young bourbon mixed 50/50. There is (to my taste) so much sugar in the Fireball that it still tastes plenty sweet, and spicy too, when cut by half.

    After drinking this mixture, I poured without thinking some Canadian whisky in the glass, just a finger, and it is surprising how much extra the very little on the frame of the glass added to the whisky. It rounded it out and made it taste much better than on its own, IMO. I used the new Century Reserve 15 Years Plus.

    Gary

  9. #9
    Virtuoso
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Harrison Township, MI
    Posts
    1,385

    Re: Dr. McGillicuddy Hot Cinnamon Fireball

    I found out years ago this product is very popular with the Great White North (no not Canada) as in Michigan's Upper Peninsula.

    One evening at a Bar with my father one of his friends say to me "Hey go tell the girl behind the bar, you need 3 shots of "The Doctor"", to which I replied "What's The Doctor". He says don't worry about it she knows!

    So She reaches into the cooler and next to the cold beer is a bottle of clear liqueur (peppermint to be exact). To which we did a shot together it was then I learned The McGillicuddy line up has been referred to as The Doctor for quite some time.

    For Peppermint Schnapps it was pretty good but only chilled.

    Cheers!

    Tony
    Last edited by ACDetroit; 10-07-2008 at 11:35.
    "So long as the presence of death lurks with anyone who goes through the simple act of swallowing, I will make mine whiskey"

  10. #10
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    9,186

    Re: Dr. McGillicuddy Hot Cinnamon Fireball

    Interesting. I've said it before and I'll say it again. The taste for peppermint schnapps, at least in part, is due to the folk memory of straight rye and some bourbon when it was (at its best) a rich, sweet drink with a tang of wintergreen or spearmint.

    The story of Minnesotans putting peppermint candies in their whiskey in the 1930's - no doubt young bourbon or a blend - provides evidence of this in my view, the story is recounted on the website of the company which markets the Phillips line of whiskeys.

    There is woven through this history too, as Tony's story shows, the association of fresh-tasting minty things and health. Fruity and minty tastes were used by early pharmaceuticals makers to disguise the bitter and other harsh tastes of drugs and medicaments. And why those tastes? Why cherry and spearmint and cocoa and not, say, apple or honey flavors? Because whiskey, good whiskey, had cherry and minty and cocoa tastes, and in olden times people associated whiskey (quite wrongly, it seems) with being good for one's health. The idea survives still in the general culture but vestigially, as e.g., the St. Bernard with the keg of brandy strung from his neck racing to save a victim in the mountains.

    Gary
    Last edited by Gillman; 10-07-2008 at 11:56.

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Hot Toddy
    By marco246 in forum Bourbon and Food
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-11-2008, 17:21
  2. Hot news!
    By dougdog in forum General Bourbon Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-08-2006, 20:02

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Back to top