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  1. #11
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    Re: Is an "acquired taste" really worth it?

    I agree 100% with Timothy & Brad: the more I'm exposed to, the wider my appreciation and I find flavors that I was at first turned off by can become memorable and subsequently very enjoyable. I like to be able to enjoy things that previously were difficult for me to appreciate -- it makes me feel like I'm getting somewhere and this whole bourbon experience is worth it.
    Last edited by funknik; 01-30-2009 at 19:35.
    "A person can work up a mean, mean thirst after a hard day of nothing much at all . . . "

    Andy

  2. #12
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
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    Re: Is an "acquired taste" really worth it?

    The expression "acquired taste" is easy to criticize in the way sotnsipper does. I think saying "it's an acquired taste" was just a polite way of saying "you may have a different opinion when you grow up." Kids tend to like very simple tastes. Most of us crave a greater variety of sensations as we get older. We fancy that as sophistication. I agree that drinking whiskey, or anything, shouldn't be a chore. It's not like forcing down brocolli because it's good for you. The purpose is pleasure so what pleases you is all that matters.

  3. #13

    Re: Is an "acquired taste" really worth it?

    If you'll excuse a random comment from a relative newcomer (again), might I suggest an exercise:
    • buy a bottle of orange soda. Tip it up and drink as much as you can. I suspect at least a few of us can drink the whole bottle at one 'pull'.
    • Okay, now try that with 375ml bottle of any bourbon you choose.

    Now, I once saw Fred Noe chug 1/3-bottle (of a 750ml bottle) of Knob Creek, but he's a professional. How much whiskey did you get down? (Something less than 1/3-bottle, I'd guess).
    My point? Well, of course, it's that bourbon/whiskey IS (always) an acquired taste. It ain't easy to drink! That's why we drown it in cola, ice it to tastelessness, or sip it in such small quantities a bottle can resemble a lifetime supply!
    There are a few bourbons I don't seek out or relish, and am quite content to forsake hereafter. There are a lot more I will welcome any time I'm offered a taste, in whatever form. There are some I will pay a day's wage for to taste again.
    I didn't always feel that way. I acquired the taste.

  4. #14
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    Re: Is an "acquired taste" really worth it?

    I know where you are going and there is a good bit of truth to what you are saying but I'd say the high alcohol content would be the greatest impediment to "chugging". Similarly, I like a hot cup of Earl Gray but I don't think I could chug a scalding cup of tea.

  5. #15
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
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    Re: Is an "acquired taste" really worth it?

    Tim is absolutely right and that's probably the best description I've seen of what "acquired taste" really means. The meaning is buried in the euphemism, as it has nothing to do with taste. It has to do with tolerance, conditioning the gag reflex as much as anything. I suppose you could also condition yourself to drink tea at ever hotter temperatures if you so desired, and in that sense the analogy works.

    Drinking eight ounces of full proof whiskey in one pull? That is how a lot of those Kentucky boys roll.
    Last edited by cowdery; 01-30-2009 at 22:28.

  6. #16
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    Re: Is an "acquired taste" really worth it?

    Quote Originally Posted by cowdery View Post
    Tim is absolutely right and that's probably the best description I've seen of what "acquired taste" really means. The meaning is buried in the euphemism, as it has nothing to do with taste. It has to do with tolerance, conditioning the gag reflex as much as anything. I suppose you could also condition yourself to drink tea at ever hotter temperatures if you so desired, and in that sense the analogy works.

    Drinking eight ounces of full proof whiskey in one pull? That is how a lot of those Kentucky boys roll.
    I see what you mean. I took it too literally.

    Tipping a bottle and having a couple three bubbles 'go up' is one thing but eight ounces in one pull. I've never tried it. And I don't intend to. Frankly, I wouldnt want to risk having it come back up. feel free to call me a wuss.............
    Last edited by ILLfarmboy; 01-30-2009 at 22:51.

  7. #17
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    Re: Is an "acquired taste" really worth it?

    Wuss



    (padwusspadwusspadwuss)
    My name is Joel Goodson. I deal in human fulfillment.
    I grossed over eight thousand dollars in one night. Time of your life, huh kid?

  8. #18
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    Re: Is an "acquired taste" really worth it?

    Quote Originally Posted by callmeox View Post
    Wuss



    (padwusspadwusspadwuss)




    I suspect you enjoyed that. A little too much

    But then, I did open myself up for it.

  9. #19
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    Re: Is an "acquired taste" really worth it?

    To me, it's a little more complicated than acquiring a taste for a particular type/brand/bottle of bourbon. I'll do my best to explain what I mean without screwing this up too much.
    Quote Originally Posted by cowdery View Post
    The meaning is buried in the euphemism, as it has nothing to do with taste.
    I agree with the first part of Chuck's statement. I hate the rhetoric when someone (especially a beer drinker) tells their friend that "you have to acquire a taste for it." No offense meant towards beer drinkers. Its kinda like Scott said,
    Quote Originally Posted by callmeox View Post
    I don't reject any bourbon after one sampling. There are too many variables involved to not give most pours another try if the first time around the block isn't satisfying.
    I disagree somewhat with the second part of Chuck's statement. I do believe it has everything to do with taste. Maybe not so much training your sense of taste (re:gag reflex), but maybe a combination of reconditioning/redirecting your taste and changing the way you think. One's mind can be an obstacle to your other senses. One example I can give is, say I prefer bourbon ABC. Whenever I used to try a new bourbon, I would always subconsciously compare it to bourbon ABC. I failed to open up my mind and relax or cleanse my sense of taste. I disappointed myself more than once. But in reference to Scott's statement, most times when I revisit a bourbon I didn't care for the first time, more often than not it tastes a lot better the second time around. Ergo your subconscious was preparing you for a bad taste again. What I have learned lately is to try and taste a new bourbon without any preconceived notions. Again, sometimes this is hard for me. I read posts, or I'm in the chat room, and a lot of people are praising the taste of bourbon DEF. I go ahead and buy a bottle of bourbon DEF. Already, I have partially preconditioned myself a little because of all the comments about bourbon DEF. I taste bourbon DEF with high expectations. I might be put off a bit just because my tastes differ ever so slightly from everyone else's.

    I suppose in the long run it's all relative. I think it's just a little strange what effect your mind can have on your other senses. It could be a case of mind over matter. If you don't mind, then it really doesn't matter. I sure hope this makes at least a little sense to some of you. Sometimes it's hard for me to put my feelings into words. (But I try hard ) Joe
    " I never met a Weller I didn't like"

  10. #20
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    Re: Is an "acquired taste" really worth it?

    Well, it seems my question was answered in several ways. It is true that almost all bourbons are acquired tastes, but, I was really meaning more like one or two bourbons you have tried, maybe multiple times, but still do not like it. When talking to others, they tell you "Oh, well, that is an acquired taste." From that point, is it really worth it to keep trying it just to get the acquired taste? For me it is not. One example for me is the VOB BIB. I have tried this several times, keep giving it a chance to grow on me, but just cant make it. A guy I work with swears by it and keeps telling me it is an acquired taste. Now I know it is only $8 a bottle, but I can spend a little more and get something I already have a taste for.
    Rye, The Spice Of Life.

 

 

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