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Thread: Angels share >

  1. #11
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    Re: Angels share >

    Quote Originally Posted by Bourbon Geek View Post
    Generally speaking, barrels do not get more or less porous with age. Scotch barrels tend to give off less angel's share for a number of reasons:

    1. They are subjected to much smaller di-urnal temperature swings (hottest day in summer to clodest day in winter) than bourbon.

    2. The Scotch warehouses tend to be non-ventilated, low slung, masonary buildings that tend to keep the humidity high ... much higher than bourbon.

    3. Some people refer to the total spirit loss as angel's share ... really there are 2 parts to the loss ... that which evaporates thru the wood and that which soaks into the wood. As such, the users of new wood (bourbon) loose an extra 5% right off the top for soakage ... while the Scotch guys and their used barrels don't see this loss.
    First-rate info there Bourbon Geek, thank you!
    Just another query, a little off topic - what did s****h makers use before used bourbon barrels became common use? Did they just use new barrels initially? if this was the case then the flavour profile of early s****h would have been markedly different...

    It is no secret that I love that elixir of the gods, bourbon.

  2. #12
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    Re: Angels share >

    Not completely sure ... they could have used port or sherry barrels (and some still do) ... they could even have just re-used their own barrels ... given the Scotch penchant for thrift, I doubt there's much chance they used new barrels for very long...
    Dave

    "Remember, the BEST bourbon is FREE bourbon ..."

  3. #13
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    Re: Angels share >

    We don't think about it so much now, but wooden barrels used to be used for everthing. They were the universal shipping container. Routine aging of spirits is a relatively new phenomenon (lets say less than 200 years old), but in order to sell your liquor to anyone beyond your immediate neighbors, you needed something to ship it in and that was barrels. Everybody used barrels and everybody made barrels, assuming they had access to suitable lumber. Barrels that previously held beer or wine, for example, would have been good for distillers to reuse.

  4. #14
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    Re: Angels share >

    Quote Originally Posted by cowdery View Post
    Barrels that previously held beer or wine, for example, would have been good for distillers to reuse.
    Pickles... not so much.
    John B

    "Drinking when we are not thirsty and making love at all seasons… that is all there is to distinguish us from other animals."

  5. #15
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    Re: Angels share >

    Quote Originally Posted by jburlowski View Post
    Pickles... not so much.
    Is somebody getting pickled? Joe
    " I never met a Weller I didn't like"

  6. #16
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    Re: Angels share >

    Quote Originally Posted by cowdery View Post
    We don't think about it so much now, but wooden barrels used to be used for everthing. They were the universal shipping container. Routine aging of spirits is a relatively new phenomenon (lets say less than 200 years old), but in order to sell your liquor to anyone beyond your immediate neighbors, you needed something to ship it in and that was barrels. Everybody used barrels and everybody made barrels, assuming they had access to suitable lumber. Barrels that previously held beer or wine, for example, would have been good for distillers to reuse.
    Interesting.... ironic how it has reverted back too with some beer brewers using old bourbon casks to flavour their beer - The Lost Abbey and Kentucky Ale are a couple of many who do.

    ... given the Scotch penchant for thrift, I doubt there's much chance they used new barrels for very long...

    It is no secret that I love that elixir of the gods, bourbon.

  7. #17
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    Re: Angels share >

    Quote Originally Posted by cowdery View Post
    We don't think about it so much now, but wooden barrels used to be used for everthing. They were the universal shipping container. Routine aging of spirits is a relatively new phenomenon (lets say less than 200 years old), but in order to sell your liquor to anyone beyond your immediate neighbors, you needed something to ship it in and that was barrels. Everybody used barrels and everybody made barrels, assuming they had access to suitable lumber. Barrels that previously held beer or wine, for example, would have been good for distillers to reuse.
    Visit Old Williamsburg and go to the copperage exhibit. The shipping barrels out of the colonies was worth almost as much as the contents. England has long ago cut down most of its forest. "Fine European Veneer" furniture was because they had no trees, so they took scrap wood to make the things and then veneer to cover it up. Today this veneer is more valuable than colonial furniture because of the "craftmanship" (In Europe wood was expensive, people were cheap. In the new World wood was cheap, people were expensive.) Colonial furniture legs split over a long time since they are made from a single piece of wood. European furniture does not since the legs were made from scrap glued together which become like todays plywood.

    Tobacco so changed the wood inside that these barrels were recycled for the wood, but most other was used again for shipping - but many still disappeared because of the wood value.

    I suspect all you could get for whiskey was French Oak and maybe then only recycled during the many wars. This may explain new oak bourbon vs used oak Scotch better than anything.

    Mike

  8. #18
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    Re: Angels share >

    Denying the Angels share....

    http://www.whisky-pages.com/stories/news-08-2008.htm

    August 2008

    "Diageo......Apparently the world's largest distiller has been carrying out secret tests over a period of five years, monitoring casks encased in clingwrap compared to those left uncovered. The results have been remarkable, with savings of up to 50 litres of spirit per cask projected over a ten year period. If 20,000 casks were treated in this manner it would produce annual savings of £1 million per annum. There are clearly questions to be answered regarding the chemical effects of this practice on maturation, which has long been thought to require casks to 'breathe' in order to achieve optimum results."

    Hmmmm....I wonder if the experiment led to increased use or if the product was determined to be of less quality as a result.

  9. #19
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    Re: Angels share >

    Reading this reminds me of how the chips I take in my lunch start to taste like plastic if I don't eat them and they get left in those zip lock sandwich bags for more than a couple days. My wife thinks I'm nuts.......I always tell her.....here, you eat 'em....otherwise, I'm throwing them out.

  10. #20
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    Re: Angels share >

    Quote Originally Posted by Stones View Post
    In short - does bourbon/rye have the highest evaporation or highest share given to the angels of all spirits?
    This is what I call high evaporation!

    http://www.straightbourbon.com/forum...ighlight=amrut

    Leif
    Swedish lover of American whiskey

 

 

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