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  1. #111
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
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    Re: The New Old Taylor, First Batch.

    I know a typical fermentation takes four to seven days, depending on how they set it. Does that tell you anything?

  2. #112
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    Re: The New Old Taylor, First Batch.

    They are more ale like in nature. However I have played around with lager yeast at higher temps for bourbon and it make for intereting esters.

  3. #113
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    Re: The New Old Taylor, First Batch.

    Quote Originally Posted by cowdery View Post
    I know a typical fermentation takes four to seven days, depending on how they set it. Does that tell you anything?
    That tells me they are more like Ale yeast. Lagers take longer to ferment. They also require temperatures well below room temperature.

  4. #114
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    Re: The New Old Taylor, First Batch.

    Quote Originally Posted by tmckenzie View Post
    They are more ale like in nature. However I have played around with lager yeast at higher temps for bourbon and it make for intereting esters.
    Fascinating. I bet you got some strong fusils. A higher ferm temp would stress the yeast, wich usually results in off flavours.

  5. #115
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    Re: The New Old Taylor, First Batch.

    That is the point, to stress the yeast to make those flavors. Off flavors in beer, means good flavors in bourbon. We ferment in the 90's.

  6. #116
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    Re: The New Old Taylor, First Batch.

    Quote Originally Posted by tmckenzie View Post
    That is the point, to stress the yeast to make those flavors. Off flavors in beer, means good flavors in bourbon. We ferment in the 90's.
    Man booze is so cool! I lern something new every day.

    If you want funky flavours, try some Belgian farmhouse ale yeast.

  7. #117
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    Re: The New Old Taylor, First Batch.

    I have used some in the past you are right. Basically when you hear about all of the old distillers who captured a wild yeast and kept it alive, it is about the same yeast as a belgian farmhouse ale yeast.

  8. #118
    Virtuoso
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    Re: The New Old Taylor, First Batch.

    I like old Old taylor.
    "Brownest of the brown liquors..so tempting. What's that? You want me to drink you? But I'm in the middle of a trial!" L. Hutz

  9. #119
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    Re: The New Old Taylor, First Batch.

    Three years down, Five to go.

  10. #120
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    Napoleon, MI
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    Re: The New Old Taylor, First Batch.

    Bumping this thread for some old and new information.
    First the old, below is the original post and photo submitted by Chuck Cowdery in August 2009.
    Below the photo is the new info from Cowdery's comments in another thread a couple of months ago.

    As archivist at the Filson Historical Society for the papers of E. H. Taylor, Jr., Mike Veach discovered that Taylor favored white corn, not yellow, and used 2 1/2 times the normal amount of barley malt -- about 25% malt. With 10% rye and the rest white corn, that was Taylor's mash bill. He distilled it to about 107 proof and put it in the barrel that way, aging it for about 8 years.
    The picture below, courtesy of Mark Brown, is that recipe, last week, in the micro-distillery fermenters at Buffalo Trace. The first batch of the new Old Taylor has started its journey.


    Some people seem to assume that the white corn bourbon BT put down for Taylor a couple of years ago will be Taylor when it comes of age. The evidence suggests otherwise. That was a one-off. They haven't made any more of it. It was, I think I heard, three barrels worth. It will be like the old fashioned sour mash, an authentic historic artifact but a one-off, not a regular product.
    ovh

 

 

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