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  1. #1
    Virtuoso
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    Proof Increase during the aging process

    I had a discussion several weeks ago with my dad about alcohol evaporation. The conversation started because I had picked up a bottle of WTKS from 2004 that looked like it had suffered from some evaporation compared to a bottle from 07 that I also purchased (although I noticed that the glass bottom on the 07 was much thicker and higher so evaporation was most likely not the case). He said that it would have a lower proof, because alcohol evaporates first.

    It got me thinking about the proof changes that occur in barrels, and I brought up that things like George T. Stagg come out at a higher barrel proof than what they were initially bottled at, and we didn't have any good answers, just some theories, as to why the proof would go up, instead of down, during the aging process. As far as whiskey in a bottle, we pretty much decided that the proof would always have to go down if there was evaporation.

    So why does the barrel proof of a bourbon sometimes climb upwards? I remember reading that it has a lot to do with temperature and location in the rickhouse (high or low). I didn't, however, find a solid answer as to why the evaporation rates would be effected. Here are some of our theories (and I'm not saying they're all good ones!):

    1) Barrels at the top of a rickhouse could have a higher proof because the atmosphere is supersaturated with alcohol molecules and they are as likely to enter as to leave (Letting more water escape and less likely to be replenished). The obvious problem with this is that as I understand it, most rickhouses are fairly well circulated.

    2)At a given temperature, alcohol could evaporate at a different (slower) rate than water and the proof would increase. We decided that this was highly unlikely if not possible after some discussion.

    3)Oak's ability to wick water vs. alcohol. Oak trees grow up with wicking water in mind, but not alcohol. Therefore, water might be more likely to be absorbed and then allowed to escape a barrel whereas the alcohol (which isn't as readily absorbed) stays within the confines of the barrel.


    Maybe all of our theories are wrong- a couple of them seem highly unlikely already (the water wicking properties of oak seem most likely to me compared to the other two anyway). Hopefully somebody out there knows an actual reason for why this happens?
    Last edited by ErichPryde; 01-15-2010 at 10:14.
    Quote Originally Posted by SMOWK View Post
    I like to save up the charred bits in the bottom of the unfiltered stuff. When I have enough, I pour milk on it and eat it.

  2. #2
    Trippah and Admin
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    Re: Proof Increase during the aging process

    I recommend that you do a forum search as the topic has been discussed here quite a bit.
    My name is Joel Goodson. I deal in human fulfillment.
    I grossed over eight thousand dollars in one night. Time of your life, huh kid?

  3. #3
    Virtuoso
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    Re: Proof Increase during the aging process

    Quote Originally Posted by callmeox View Post
    I recommend that you do a forum search as the topic has been discussed here quite a bit.
    ...I see what you mean. I had previously run several searches, but apparently they were too specific or simply worded improperly.

    Looks like essentially, it's the difference in wicking rates between alcohol and water in wood and water concentration in the atmosphere (humidity).
    Last edited by ErichPryde; 01-15-2010 at 12:17.
    Quote Originally Posted by SMOWK View Post
    I like to save up the charred bits in the bottom of the unfiltered stuff. When I have enough, I pour milk on it and eat it.

  4. #4
    Connoisseur
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    Re: Proof Increase during the aging process

    Quote Originally Posted by ErichPryde View Post
    ...I see what you mean. I had previously run several searches, but apparently they were too specific or simply worded improperly.

    Looks like essentially, it's the difference in wicking rates between wood and water and water concentration in the atmosphere (humidity).

    You are correct sir. That's why you see the opposite happen to scotch as it ages. Scotch goes in at a higher proof and the proof slowly decreases as it ages. That's why some really old barrells of scotch get to the point where they have to be bottled or else they will drop below 40% ABV and have to go into a blend, which given the age would be a great loss in terms of profit. Escpecially when taking into account all the taxes paid on that whiskey as it aged over 50+ years.
    Richard
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  5. #5
    Irreverent One
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    Re: Proof Increase during the aging process

    I wonder what would happen if the barrels were stored in a place where there is as much alcohol vapor in the atmosphere as there is water vapor. You know, like Key West or the French Quarter of New Orleans.
    Scott

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  6. #6
    Connoisseur
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    Re: Proof Increase during the aging process

    Quote Originally Posted by CorvallisCracker View Post
    I wonder what would happen if the barrels were stored in a place where there is as much alcohol vapor in the atmosphere as there is water vapor. You know, like Key West or the French Quarter of New Orleans.
    Too funny my good man
    Richard
    GBS Member rounding out the top 5
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  7. #7
    Advanced Taster
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    Re: Proof Increase during the aging process

    Quote Originally Posted by CorvallisCracker View Post
    I wonder what would happen if the barrels were stored in a place where there is as much alcohol vapor in the atmosphere as there is water vapor. You know, like Key West or the French Quarter of New Orleans.
    Since the oak barrel is considered to be a membrane ... what migrates across the membrane is a function of the conditions on both sides. If the atmosphere, temperature, and pressure outside the barrel was exactly the same as the inside, there would be no migration across the membrane ... ie no new angel's share.
    Dave

    "Remember, the BEST bourbon is FREE bourbon ..."

 

 

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