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  1. #41
    Virtuoso
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    Re: Before Makers' Mark, it was not OK for bourbon to taste good!

    Allow me, if I may, to add a point that seems to be lacking in this thread.

    I understand that the majority of this board finds MM to be a less than stellar tasting product with a premium price. And I tend to agree. But I think you need to realize that MM took the stand years ago to be an industry leader and not an enthuiasts favorite. MM is a business and the business is selling bottles. Which it does well. And since the product cannot really stand on its own, it needs advertising to support it. And their marketing plan is no different than others that plan to be market leaders. Is Budweiser the "best " beer out there? They say it is. But the hard core beer drinkers I know won't touch it. Does that mean Budweiser should go back in and re-work the recipe to supply a product that is in favor with the hardliners? absolutely not. They are already selling more product than any other beer. MM is doing the same thing. We can wish all day long that MM would make a better product and taste more like the VW lines, but why would they want to follow the VW business plan if they are already selling so much more product then VW? remember, that is the goal. Selling product. McDonalds has a similar plan. Not the best burgers, but they sell the most. Thats the plan. Don't hate them for it. Just don't but into it if you don't like the product.

    and also remember, we here on the board are the 1%'ers. We are more knowledgeable and emotionally tied to our bourbons than 99% of the population. I wouldn't build a business plan around us, I'd plan it around the more "impressionable" 99%.

    Sorry for the ramblings....
    Cheers,

    Scott

    Reality is an illusion created by a lack of alcohol.

  2. #42
    Enthusiast
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    Dec 2009
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    Louisville, KY
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    495

    Re: Before Makers' Mark, it was not OK for bourbon to taste good!

    That was a great post Scott. The analogies to Budweiser and McDonald's put it in perspective a little bit. I did want to take it one step further and say that IMO Maker's Mark has done better than McDonald's and Budweiser in promoting a "PREMIUM" product. When people drink The Diesel or eat a Double Quarter Pounder with Cheese, they might like it, but I doubt they are under the illusion that no better beer or burger exists. Maker's has definitely succeeded in making people think there is nothing else out there better than the red wax dipped bottle.

  3. #43
    Guru
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    Jun 2008
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    5,231

    Re: Before Makers' Mark, it was not OK for bourbon to taste good!

    Quote Originally Posted by birdman1099 View Post
    Allow me, if I may, to add a point that seems to be lacking in this thread...
    ...and also remember, we here on the board are the 1%'ers. We are more knowledgeable and emotionally tied to our bourbons than 99% of the population. I wouldn't build a business plan around us, I'd plan it around the more "impressionable" 99%.

    Sorry for the ramblings....
    Well put Scott.


    pad
    bibamus, moriendum est
    Sipology Blog

  4. #44
    Disciple
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    May 2008
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    Swaziland, Africa
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    1,502

    Re: Before Makers' Mark, it was not OK for bourbon to taste good!

    I would compare Jim Beam White to McD's and MM to something like Applebees. It is better than the cheap/easy stuff, but everyone knows it is not like the local specialty shop.
    Hope is subversive, for it limits the grandiose pretensions of the present by calling into existence the possibility of something better.

  5. #45
    Advanced Taster
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    Jan 2010
    Location
    Des Moines, IA
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    101

    Re: Before Makers' Mark, it was not OK for bourbon to taste good!

    And people wondered why I said I noticed "A bit of hostility" around MM when I first joined.



    I think this thread proves that some people here are a bit hostile about this particular bottle of flavored distillate.

    Birdman, that was a great post. If people still don't get it, then oh well. Its all about selling product, in the end, whether you like it or not.

    Some sell $80 - $150 bottles to a tiny market, some sell $35 bottles to a much larger market.

  6. #46
    Bourbonian Of The Year 2013 and Guru
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    Sep 2004
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    Just East of the Big Chicken, GA
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    6,132

    Re: Before Makers' Mark, it was not OK for bourbon to taste good!

    Indeed Scott, nice post. I agree with nblair though, in regards to the mission not targeting the masses with a general product, rather targeting the premium imbibers with a premium product.

    I've always been puzzled by the perception of the Marketing efforts of Maker's Mark. I honestly do not see the overwhelming marketing effort that many believe is coming out of them. I don't see anything from them that is any different than the efforts of just about any other distillery. Am I wrong on this?

    Finally as a general statement, I think we need to be careful in how we categorize what is inside the bottle. Or, any bottle for that matter. Many times I hear "Poor quality", or "bad", as descriptors of Maker's. These really are inaccurate adjectives for it. You may not like it, or you may like other bourbons better for any number of reasons, but there is nothing in Maker's processes nor the final product that can be constituted as either "bad" or "poor quality".

    Sorry for my ramblings, too...
    JOE

    Wag more.
    Bark less.

    "Every bottle is its own learning experience." -- Sensei Ox-sama

  7. #47
    Connoisseur
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    Feb 2010
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    Raleigh
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    505

    Re: Before Makers' Mark, it was not OK for bourbon to taste good!

    Quote Originally Posted by smokinjoe View Post
    ...I've always been puzzled by the perception of the Marketing efforts of Maker's Mark. I honestly do not see the overwhelming marketing effort that many believe is coming out of them. I don't see anything from them that is any different than the efforts of just about any other distillery. Am I wrong on this?...
    I operate my own business. I can tell you that from a business and marketing perspective MM has 3 big factors that aide them in creating the perception of being a "premium" brand in the minds of the mass consumer:

    1. Unique & highly recognizable packaging. Almost all alcohol consumers can easily identify the MM product.
    2. Distribution. The MM bottle sits on the top shelf of almost every bar in th country.
    3. Past & present marketing. Most people are sheep and easily influenced. Once they buy into it, more often than not, they are done.

    I can't tell you how many of bottles off MM that I bought and mixed with ginger ale over the years. I bought into the hype, just as many other consumers do. If it weren't for SB I wouldn't be any the wiser.

    JMHO
    Rod

  8. #48
    Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    345

    Re: Before Makers' Mark, it was not OK for bourbon to taste good!

    Very interesting thread.

    I like MM. I'm not sure how I would classify it. Premium? Mid-shelf? I guess it doesn't really matter much to me. At $27-28, I'll pass on it every time. At $22-23, it's part of my regular rotation.

    I also think there are some consumers who don't like MM because it is so ubiquitous. That happens with a lot with good products. Once they become mainstream, a certain segment of the population dismisses them. I believe there's some of that with MM.

    Just my $0.02.

  9. #49
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Sep 2002
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    Toronto, Canada
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    9,186

    Re: Before Makers' Mark, it was not OK for bourbon to taste good!

    One factor sometimes overlooked I think is that the average buyer, who has no idea of the range out there of whiskey and its characteristics, tends to choose, not necessarily the best, but just something reliable. Indeed the "best" may not be wanted, due to price. So you get a known quantity and it won't displease - as important as getting something that is "the best"... I know this because I apply this rule to other areas of consumer products, say cookies. I like Dad's oatmeal cookies (a brand we get in Canada, not sure if it is a U.S. brand also). There are so many kinds out there, but I am not sure I have the time or interest to experiment, plus I don't want to waste $$$ on something I won't like. So I buy Dad's brand because it is always good and I know what it is like.

    Gary

  10. #50
    Bourbonian Of The Year 2013 and Guru
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    Just East of the Big Chicken, GA
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    6,132

    Re: Before Makers' Mark, it was not OK for bourbon to taste good!

    Quote Originally Posted by Halifax View Post
    I operate my own business. I can tell you that from a business and marketing perspective MM has 3 big factors that aide them in creating the perception of being a "premium" brand in the minds of the mass consumer:

    1. Unique & highly recognizable packaging. Almost all alcohol consumers can easily identify the MM product.
    2. Distribution. The MM bottle sits on the top shelf of almost every bar in th country.
    3. Past & present marketing. Most people are sheep and easily influenced. Once they buy into it, more often than not, they are done.

    I can't tell you how many of bottles off MM that I bought and mixed with ginger ale over the years. I bought into the hype, just as many other consumers do. If it weren't for SB I wouldn't be any the wiser.

    JMHO
    Rod

    Thanks for input, Rod. But, I don't see where your list differs from what other distilleries do. Even in breadth and scope. Where is the past and present marketing that has the sheeple fooled? I've just not seen an overwhelming amount of information/marketing/advertising presented by MM. Certainly, not anything resembling MM induced "hype". Short of the occasional billboard, I don't see anything in the other media. No radio, TV, internet ads, newspaper, mags, sports related mkg, blimp, NASCAR Chevy ...nothing. I'm sure there are some spots in some of the media I listed, but not an inundation. Sure, you can get a fair amount of MM apparel etc. at the gift shop, but you can get similar at BT, HH, etc. I just don't get it.
    JOE

    Wag more.
    Bark less.

    "Every bottle is its own learning experience." -- Sensei Ox-sama

 

 

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