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  1. #1

    danfields 21 year old limited edition

    Hi all, I just bought a bottle of the Danfields 21 year old Limited Edition. Anyone know what the "limited edition" refers to? is the number of bottles made? if so, anyone know how many they made?

  2. #2
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    Re: danfields 21 year old limited edition

    Quote Originally Posted by velocci View Post
    Hi all, I just bought a bottle of the Danfields 21 year old Limited Edition. Anyone know what the "limited edition" refers to? is the number of bottles made? if so, anyone know how many they made?
    Not sure, but I wouldn't pay much attention to that. It has been around for a few years at any rate. Other "limited editions" such as Crown Royal and Alberta Premium have been around quite a while or are still going. Great whisky, though.

    Consider also that their standard 10 year old blend is called Private Reserve. It seems to be a meaningless designation, as I'm sure the whisky comes from their main stock and not a "reserve" stock. Who really knows, though? Not a lot of information out there about this distillery. What the hell is "diamond filtering" anyway?
    Last edited by Megawatt; 04-29-2010 at 16:13.

  3. #3
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    Re: danfields 21 year old limited edition

    Hope is subversive, for it limits the grandiose pretensions of the present by calling into existence the possibility of something better.

  4. #4

    Re: danfields 21 year old limited edition

    come on, everyone knows diamond filtering creates superior whisky.

    Quote Originally Posted by Megawatt View Post
    What the hell is "diamond filtering" anyway?

  5. #5
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    Re: danfields 21 year old limited edition

    It's too bad that the average whisky consumer in Canada values "smoothness" above all, so you get distillers triple-filtering for "the smoothest possible taste". Just what do people think they are filtering out to make it so smooth, if not the flavour?

  6. #6

    Re: danfields 21 year old limited edition

    hi megawatt, i'm an average whisky consumer. I'm by no means a connoisseur. can you explain this in more detail?

    Quote Originally Posted by Megawatt View Post
    It's too bad that the average whisky consumer in Canada values "smoothness" above all, so you get distillers triple-filtering for "the smoothest possible taste". Just what do people think they are filtering out to make it so smooth, if not the flavour?

  7. #7
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    Re: danfields 21 year old limited edition

    Quote Originally Posted by velocci View Post
    hi megawatt, i'm an average whisky consumer. I'm by no means a connoisseur. can you explain this in more detail?
    Certainly, and I hope you didn't my statement to be disparaging to you or your preferences. The way I see it is, the majority of Canadians who drink Canadian whisky limit themselves to one or two brands and usually drink it mixed. I know this is a generalization but I think it holds true. Browse the Web enough and you'll come across hundreds of people who declare that Canadian Club/Crown Royal/Gibsons/whatever is the best whisky ever. Almost invariably the main consideration for such consumers is smoothness. Nothing wrong with that, but "smooth" is a vague statement which by itself says little about a whisky. What does it really mean? That there is little alcohol burn? No harsh flavours? Smoothness may be desireable but at what cost? When a whisky like Danfields says they use a triple-filtration method, it sounds more suitable for vodka to me, where the goal is to remove flavour. Why else filter so much? What "impurities" are they trying to remove to achieve the ultimate smoothness? Remember that without impurities (congeners) you have no taste (i.e. vodka). That's what they ultimately strive for, many of these distilleries: "the smoothest possible taste." Why? Because it's what consumers seem to want. Compare to the growing single malt market, where distillers are moving away from filtration because there is a growing belief that less filtration = more flavour, and flavour is what connoiseurs/enthusiasts pay for above all.

    What I'm trying to say is, I would like to see a movement among Canadian distillers to more robust, flavourful whiskies, where you can judge a whisky by more than its relative smoothness. That said, I love Canadian whisky as it is, and some distilleries are already making some great products. I'm sure you'll enjoy that Danfield's 21. I sure did when I had it years ago. I recall an abundance of butterscotch flavour. The great thing about very old Canadians is that while you don't get a ton of complexity you do get incredible body and silky mouthfeel.

    I hope I made my position a little more clear, and without coming across as a snob or anything.

  8. #8

    Re: danfields 21 year old limited edition

    i like to try different whiskies instead of sticking to the same thing, which is why i bought the danfields. and I like a whisky that is full of flavour like the wisers 18 yo. i ended up cracking open the danfields and loved it. to me it was alot like the wisers 18yo.

    Quote Originally Posted by Megawatt View Post
    Certainly, and I hope you didn't my statement to be disparaging to you or your preferences. The way I see it is, the majority of Canadians who drink Canadian whisky limit themselves to one or two brands and usually drink it mixed. I know this is a generalization but I think it holds true. Browse the Web enough and you'll come across hundreds of people who declare that Canadian Club/Crown Royal/Gibsons/whatever is the best whisky ever. Almost invariably the main consideration for such consumers is smoothness. Nothing wrong with that, but "smooth" is a vague statement which by itself says little about a whisky. What does it really mean? That there is little alcohol burn? No harsh flavours? Smoothness may be desireable but at what cost? When a whisky like Danfields says they use a triple-filtration method, it sounds more suitable for vodka to me, where the goal is to remove flavour. Why else filter so much? What "impurities" are they trying to remove to achieve the ultimate smoothness? Remember that without impurities (congeners) you have no taste (i.e. vodka). That's what they ultimately strive for, many of these distilleries: "the smoothest possible taste." Why? Because it's what consumers seem to want. Compare to the growing single malt market, where distillers are moving away from filtration because there is a growing belief that less filtration = more flavour, and flavour is what connoiseurs/enthusiasts pay for above all.

    What I'm trying to say is, I would like to see a movement among Canadian distillers to more robust, flavourful whiskies, where you can judge a whisky by more than its relative smoothness. That said, I love Canadian whisky as it is, and some distilleries are already making some great products. I'm sure you'll enjoy that Danfield's 21. I sure did when I had it years ago. I recall an abundance of butterscotch flavour. The great thing about very old Canadians is that while you don't get a ton of complexity you do get incredible body and silky mouthfeel.

    I hope I made my position a little more clear, and without coming across as a snob or anything.

 

 

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