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  1. #1
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    Is Hansell listening?

    So as I'm reading some of the new Whiskey books like Broom's World Atlas, and Roskrow's World's Best Whiskies, I'm struck by something that I'm sure we've all seen before. Yet another Brit who takes up 3/4 of the book droning on about Scotch, then proceeds to make many small mistakes when it comes to the too small section on American Whiskey.

    Now that Hansell has joined Marv Shanken's Wine Spectator universe, with all their publishing muscle, the time is ripe for a thorough, giant, book on American Whiskey. And we all know that Cowdery is the man for the job.

    It could expand on Chuck's earlier book by also including detailed profiles of every domestic distiller of Whiskey, including detailed info on EVERY brand and sku, with everything from mashbills, to yeasts, to oak treatment. Also, we want glossy photos and maps, without getting in the way of hard content.

    Let's go John. We'll all buy a copy, and Chuck, Shanken, and yourself can make a few bucks.

  2. #2
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    Re: Is Hansell listening?

    Great idea, I would buy one for sure.

    We need a go to tome on the American Whiskey experience. Make it so.
    ~Robert BTOTY #2 2009

    GBS Member - 2011 Indoctrination

  3. #3
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    Re: Is Hansell listening?

    Warning, marginally related rant:

    I haven't read Broom's book (although I'm a big fan of Johnson's World Atlas of Wine) but one of the challenges to a book like that is that regionalism is much, much less of a factor in the world of American Whiskey than it is in the world of Scotch.

    At one time, maybe you did have a PA style rye or a MD style rye, and now there does seem to be a high-rye "Lawrenceburg style" (although it's more by accident), and one could consider TN whiskey a regional style, but other than that, region doesn't matter. 20 years ago, could one imagine more different whiskeys than Old Charter, Old Forester and Old Weller? But they were all made in Louisville. By contrast one can very much taste the Speyside or Islay when one is drinking Laphroaig, Caol Ila, et al or Macallan, Dalmore, et al.

    So I'm not sure if a book that is structured around regions of whiskey production in the U.S. can really be effective.

    That said, I'd love to read another book by Chuck and I like big glossy pictures.
    bibamus, moriendum est
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  4. #4
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    Re: Is Hansell listening?

    Quote Originally Posted by Josh View Post
    Warning, marginally related rant:

    I haven't read Broom's book (although I'm a big fan of Johnson's World Atlas of Wine) but one of the challenges to a book like that is that regionalism is much, much less of a factor in the world of American Whiskey than it is in the world of Scotch.

    At one time, maybe you did have a PA style rye or a MD style rye, and now there does seem to be a high-rye "Lawrenceburg style" (although it's more by accident), and one could consider TN whiskey a regional style, but other than that, region doesn't matter. 20 years ago, could one imagine more different whiskeys than Old Charter, Old Forester and Old Weller? But they were all made in Louisville. By contrast one can very much taste the Speyside or Islay when one is drinking Laphroaig, Caol Ila, et al or Macallan, Dalmore, et al.

    So I'm not sure if a book that is structured around regions of whiskey production in the U.S. can really be effective.

    That said, I'd love to read another book by Chuck and I like big glossy pictures.
    I hear ya, but it wouldn't need to be done in an atlas style. In those British written books, we only get 2 pages on Heaven Hill, then it will list 3 or 4 products.

    Chuck could fill a whole chapter on Heaven Hill and it's history, dirt and all, plus pages and pages on the dozens of brands they make. And I would dream about seeing EVERY label all in one place. And I'm just using HH as an example. We would need chapters on FR, WT, BT, B-F, TM, MM, JB, JD, GD, LDI, Anchor... There could be a chapter on silent distilleries. Hell, Stitzel Weller would demand an entire chapter itself. I'd also love a chapter on Michter's, the distillery not the label. Willet/KBD would fill a chapter. A chapter on Rye, covering its east coast beginnings, and extending to a breakdown of every current Rye being produced, both macro and micro. How about a chapter on the history and role of the American oak barrel, extending into it's influence on Scotch. (After all, where would scotch be without Bourbon barrels.)

    Come on Hansell, let's get Shanken on board. Chuck??

  5. #5
    Bourbonian of the Year 2010 and Guru
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    Re: Is Hansell listening?

    Much as I like Chuck, I'd really rather an update to Regan's The Book of Bourbon.
    2010 Bourbonian of the Year

    As long as you have good whiskey you're not "unemployed", you're "Funemployed!!!"

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  6. #6
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    Re: Is Hansell listening?

    I'm listening.

    I would LOVE to see a good, thorough, American whiskey book. The M. Shanken Group is more of a magazine publishing and events kind of company. They're not doing much in the way of book publishing, I'm afraid.

    That's not to say that he woudn't endorse such a book, but I think it would have to come from one of his full-time writers, which Chuck isn't. (Well, not yet anyway. )
    Publisher and Editor of Whisky Advocate magazine.

  7. #7
    Bourbonian of the Year 2006
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    Re: Is Hansell listening?

    Is Hollywood Listening?

    Movie Rights?
    Colonel Ed
    Bourbonian of the Year 2006

    Comissioned by Paul Patton, 1999

    "It ain't the booze that brings me in here, it's the solace it distills"

  8. #8
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    Re: Is Hansell listening?

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnHansell View Post
    I'm listening.

    I would LOVE to see a good, thorough, American whiskey book. The M. Shanken Group is more of a magazine publishing and events kind of company. They're not doing much in the way of book publishing, I'm afraid.

    That's not to say that he woudn't endorse such a book, but I think it would have to come from one of his full-time writers, which Chuck isn't. (Well, not yet anyway. )
    Hello John. Actually, I believe that James Laube's "California Wine," and all the Matt Kramer wine books are published by Shanken Publishing. I know that Laube and Kramer are full-time staff writers, but now that you guys have merged, there are all types of possibilities.

  9. #9
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    Re: Is Hansell listening?

    If I'm not mistaken Mike Veach has a book something like that near completion.

  10. #10
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    Re: Is Hansell listening?

    Quote Originally Posted by White Dog View Post
    Hello John. Actually, I believe that James Laube's "California Wine," and all the Matt Kramer wine books are published by Shanken Publishing. I know that Laube and Kramer are full-time staff writers, but now that you guys have merged, there are all types of possibilities.
    Yes, that's true. Marvin isn't 100% against the idea, but it would have to be a full-time writer. (I don't have time to write a book.)
    Publisher and Editor of Whisky Advocate magazine.

 

 

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