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Thread: Whiskey Tree

  1. #131
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    Re: Whiskey Tree

    Quote Originally Posted by Restaurant man View Post
    Buffalo Trace, #4 char, Independent Stave
    #2, lower corn- Ancient Age*, Elmer T. Lee*, Hancock*, Blanton's*, Rock Hill Farms*, Virginia Gentleman/Bowman Bourbons?
    Wheat bourbon: Everything Weller, Van Winkle Special Reserve "Lot B"*, Old Rip Van Winkle*, Pappy Van Winkle 15 y/o*

    so should I get" a strong family resemblance between all these whiskies? I definitely do between lot b and Elmer t lee. I was shocked when I tasted etl for the first time tonight how similar it was to lob b. The rest of em, not so sure. Don't remember any resemblance to blantons though. Where is the point of difference? Is it all just age and barrel placement?
    Normally, I would say you should see some similarities among the whiskies produced by the same distillery. But that you have so far only spotted a resemblance between Elmer T. Lee and Van Winkle "Lot B" is, well, peculiar.

    Yes, barrel location and age will affect similarity among whiskies, and ETL is reputedly around the same age as the Lot B (10-14 years). However, the mash bill, yeast, type of still, proof off the still, barrel entry proof, and barrel char will also play a part, and that list is hardly exhaustive. I suspect most of us would find the closest resemblance among the whiskies with the same mash bill and yeast, but these will also tend to have the same proof off the still, barrel entry proof, and barrel char, as they come from the same distillery. As a consumer, it's actually hard to know what variables matter (and how) without the sort of work being done by Buffalo Trace with their Single Oak project.

    It's also possible that your palate is "calibrated" differently from others. Most of us have tasted many whiskies from many distilleries, and so have a sense of the range among them, which can also help to define a distillery "character." For instance, I don't have much trouble discriminating Buffalo Trace, Heaven Hill, Beam, or Four Roses products from one another. To me, Buffalo Trace and Eagle Rare 10 are certainly similar when tasted head to head, and the same goes for Booker's vs. Baker's vs. Knob Creek, or any of the Four Roses single barrels (w/ different mash bills and yeasts, no less). Mixing and matching between distilleries, however, shows how different they can be (though surprisingly less often than you might think).

    All of this to say that you might profit from arranging a few head to head tastings of your own, using comparison whiskies from both the same and different distilleries, as well as similar vs. different mash bills, ages, etc. I've learned a lot that way.
    "Good" may be subjective, but that doesn't mean it's arbitrary.

  2. #132
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    Re: Whiskey Tree

    Quote Originally Posted by AaronWF View Post
    Barton: 10/80/10 in Rendezvous Rye and 16yo Rocky Mountain Rye

    Four Roses: 10yo E recipe (can't find which one) in Bourye and 5yo E recipe in Son of Bourye.

    This info may be peripheral to the point of your tree, so feel free to ignore!
    Thanks for the info! I'll give some thought to how to best work that in.

    Quote Originally Posted by Restaurant man View Post

    so should I get" a strong family resemblance between all these whiskies? I definitely do between lot b and Elmer t lee. I was shocked when I tasted etl for the first time tonight how similar it was to lob b. The rest of em, not so sure. Don't remember any resemblance to blantons though. Where is the point of difference? Is it all just age and barrel placement?
    In the case of Blanton's, every barrel that goes into Blanton's is from the only warehouse on the property that is of the metal-clad type, warehouse H. The others, IIRC are all brick.

    The biggest difference, as Aaron pointed out is that Lot B is a wheater and ETL is not. I haven't noticed a lot of similarities between the two myself, but they may very well be aged in the same warehouses or in similar positions within those warehouses.

    To me, Blanton's is much more tannic than AAA 10 y/o, ETL or RHF. One bottle I had was like walking into Wilson's at the Mall.
    bibamus, moriendum est
    Sipology Blog

  3. #133
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    Re: Whiskey Tree

    Quote Originally Posted by Josh View Post
    To me, Blanton's is much more tannic than AAA 10 y/o, ETL or RHF. One bottle I had was like walking into Wilson's at the Mall.
    What a great simile! Will have to remember that one ... I think I can smell it now ...
    Mark

  4. #134
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    Re: Whiskey Tree

    Must bump, as I saw another posted question that is in need of this thread, which is "The Most Deserving Sticky Thread, but Alas, Remains None-Sticky."

  5. #135
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    Re: Whiskey Tree

    Quote Originally Posted by dbk View Post
    Normally, I would say you should see some similarities among the whiskies produced by the same distillery. But that you have so far only spotted a resemblance between Elmer T. Lee and Van Winkle "Lot B" is, well, peculiar.

    Yes, barrel location and age will affect similarity among whiskies, and ETL is reputedly around the same age as the Lot B (10-14 years). However, the mash bill, yeast, type of still, proof off the still, barrel entry proof, and barrel char will also play a part, and that list is hardly exhaustive. I suspect most of us would find the closest resemblance among the whiskies with the same mash bill and yeast, but these will also tend to have the same proof off the still, barrel entry proof, and barrel char, as they come from the same distillery. As a consumer, it's actually hard to know what variables matter (and how) without the sort of work being done by Buffalo Trace with their Single Oak project.

    It's also possible that your palate is "calibrated" differently from others. Most of us have tasted many whiskies from many distilleries, and so have a sense of the range among them, which can also help to define a distillery "character." For instance, I don't have much trouble discriminating Buffalo Trace, Heaven Hill, Beam, or Four Roses products from one another. To me, Buffalo Trace and Eagle Rare 10 are certainly similar when tasted head to head, and the same goes for Booker's vs. Baker's vs. Knob Creek, or any of the Four Roses single barrels (w/ different mash bills and yeasts, no less). Mixing and matching between distilleries, however, shows how different they can be (though surprisingly less often than you might think).

    All of this to say that you might profit from arranging a few head to head tastings of your own, using comparison whiskies from both the same and different distilleries, as well as similar vs. different mash bills, ages, etc. I've learned a lot that way.
    Wow! your answer leaps to a lot of conclusions about my knowledge of the subject. Thank you for being the expert that you are and taking the time to educate dolts like myself. you are a true humanitarian!
    "On a long enough timeline, the survival rate for everyone drops to zero"
    T. Durden

  6. #136
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    Re: Whiskey Tree

    Quote Originally Posted by Restaurant man View Post
    Wow! your answer leaps to a lot of conclusions about my knowledge of the subject. Thank you for being the expert that you are and taking the time to educate dolts like myself. you are a true humanitarian!
    That was supposed to be tongue and cheek but on second read I sounded like a doosh. sorry
    "On a long enough timeline, the survival rate for everyone drops to zero"
    T. Durden

  7. #137
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    Re: Whiskey Tree

    Quote Originally Posted by Josh View Post
    LDI, ??? char, Independent Stave?
    Sells bourbon and rye for many brands including Templeton, Redemption et al, High West, W.H. Harrison, Cougar (Australia), Bulleit Rye and KBD. For a breakdown of the of corn, rye and bourbon whiskey mashbills used, see the LDI website: http://www.lawrenceburgdistillersind...om/Custom.aspx

    Again, if anybody sees anything screwy, don't be shy! post it here so it can be corrected.
    The Marketing materials for Bulleit cite a 95% Rye mashbill. Not sure if this helps or not...
    "Suppose he's got a pointed stick!?!"

    - Eric Idle, Monty Python's Flying Circus

  8. #138
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    Re: Whiskey Tree

    This thread is still not sticky?? Really?

    Scott, Paul and Mr. Gorbachev, please tear down this wall!

  9. #139

    Re: Whiskey Tree

    Love the Whiskey Tree! Found it in the preparation of a similar list. Couple of possible corrections from other sources:

    George Dickel from (80/12/8) to (84/8/8)
    http://www.alcademics.com/2012/06/di...ge-dickel.html
    Jack Daniels from (80/8/12) to (80/12/8)
    http://chuckcowdery.blogspot.com/201...-rye-mean.html
    Bulleit Bourbon (68/28/4)
    http://scotchhobbyist.com/2010/02/04/bulleit-bourbon-tasting/

  10. #140
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    Re: Whiskey Tree

    Quote Originally Posted by Sylvan View Post
    Love the Whiskey Tree! Found it in the preparation of a similar list. Couple of possible corrections from other sources:

    George Dickel from (80/12/8) to (84/8/8)
    http://www.alcademics.com/2012/06/di...ge-dickel.html
    Jack Daniels from (80/8/12) to (80/12/8)
    http://chuckcowdery.blogspot.com/201...-rye-mean.html
    Bulleit Bourbon (68/28/4)
    http://scotchhobbyist.com/2010/02/04/bulleit-bourbon-tasting/
    Tis a great thread. But if you need to know the Bulleit mashbills, simply visit the 4R and LDI websites. Don't believe a blogger who's drinking the kool-aid.

 

 

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