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  1. #11
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    Re: New Beam Black Packaging

    Not trying to change the subject I'm trying to picture this in my head but wouldn't Paleteritized whiskey have less wood exposure as it evaporated than rick barrels? Or am I just not good at math?
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  2. #12
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    Re: New Beam Black Packaging

    There are numerous factors to consider. I know studies were done in Scotland on the effects of maturing whisky in the old dunnage (stone and earth floor) warehouses versus steel buildings where the barrels stand end to end. The top or head space of each barrel is different, the temperature variations won't be the same (nor too for each dunnage and more so where in different parts of the country), etc. So many variables... And in the U.S. again it will be different as between iron clad warehouses, brick ones where the barrels stand as in iron clads, and palletized type which I understand are temperature controlled (no hundreds of windows as in the iron clad type). I have never tasted the same new make as aged in each type for the same time, so I can't offer any thoughts based on actual taste tests, but it makes sense to me - it's a belief or opinion - that the results can't be the same and therefore, a bourbon drawn from all iron clad will be somewhat different from one drawn from one of other types and so will a bourbon featuring a different proportion of these. And so when I read some years ago that all new storage for Beam bourbon will be built in the old way, I thought long-term this might have some impact on the palate, beneficial likely I thought. And this is why or one of the reasons I still buy Jim Beam. This may sound odd to some ears but it is a reasonable way to look at it IMO.

    Gary

  3. #13
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    Re: New Beam Black Packaging

    All of the warehouses have roughly the same capacity although I believe the newer rackhouses are a bit larger. I estimate about 4% of Beam's whiskey comes from the palletized warehouses, which I contend is unlikely to have an effect on the overall flavor profile, even assuming some discernable difference between the two types, which I reject.

    All Beam warehouses, including the palletized, are metal-clad.

    In the palletized warehouses the barrels stand on end and are stacked on pallets and moved around by huge fork lifts. The building is just a big open shell with large truck bay doors at one end and massive vented fans at the other to provide air circulation.

    I was told that the biggest problem with them was leakage. They worked fine as far as maturation but they lost too much through leakage.

  4. #14
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    Re: New Beam Black Packaging

    No body answered my question
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  5. #15
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    Re: New Beam Black Packaging

    Quote Originally Posted by p_elliott View Post
    No body answered my question
    My mental math says that there would be less air surface in a partially filled barrel standing on end than one on its side, assuming they contain the same volume. Assuming that this exposed surface is the main location for oxidation, a vertical barrel will oxidize less than one stored horizontally.

    Do the barrelheads impart the same, more or less flavor than the staves? A barel on end has exactly one barrelhead comtacting the whiskey as it ages but one on its side has more than that untl it is half full, then the barrelhead contact is less.

    So, to you want greater oxidation and barrelhead contact or less of each?
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  6. #16
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    Re: New Beam Black Packaging

    Paul, I think barrels on pallets must have less exposure to the wood than racked ones, you are right. The top (barrel end) surface is lost or will be after a few months aging. And so with greater wood contact in racked warehousing, one would think such barrels would age faster. And they do, Waymack and Harris state that aging is 20% slower in palletized warehouses. They don't quote a source for this statement but it is in a section dealing with Beam's two warehouses of this type and in which they interviewed Booker Beam. There may be other factors for that 20% too, e.g., the air may not circulate the same way as in racked warehouses albeit Beam uses no temperature control or so is my understanding.

    Such bourbon therefore to my mind can't taste exactly like its counterpart aged in a racked warehouse but if it's only 4% of the bourbon in the bottle - if - I agree the taste can't be affected very much.

    Gary

  7. #17
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    Re: New Beam Black Packaging

    Scott, I follow your logic but I've always understood the aging comes from direct contact with the wood, the "breathing" and cycles of movement in and out you get with the weather changes. There would be some oxidation on the top (exposed) layer, similar perhaps to that standing in a bottle, but I don't think that's where the active principles of maturation are most at work.

    Gary

  8. #18
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    Re: New Beam Black Packaging

    Gary,

    I'm kind of curious as to how much change there will be as well. I have various beam running from 1968 to current, and the differences from there to here are less apparent than some of the similarities.

    Of all the bourbons out there that can be sampled on a long time frame, Beam might actually be one that has changed the least. It has changed, it's gotten better, worse, better, &c, but the signature notes have remained the same throughout.
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  9. #19
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    Re: New Beam Black Packaging

    Erich,

    I'll offer taste notes on the "new" Beam Black in a moment, but must say I disagree with you regarding the profile over the period you mention. I have had numerous Beams issued between about '68 (i.e., distilled circa-1960) and 1990. In that period, whether from bottle or decanter, I found the taste quite different from Beam after that time. In particular it did not have the anise/orange rind taste I find characteristic of Beam in the last 20 years or so. As an example, I cite Doug Philip's Beam's Choice from the 1970's which was a rich rummy bourbon the likes of which I wish I could buy today.

    That said, I find this new format (international only I think) Beam Black excellent. You should see the legs it throws, and taste is clean, deep, rich and inviting. The mouthfeel is soft and well-integrated, for a bourbon claiming only 6 years it is very mature. It is very similar to the best Knob Creek I've had but with a lesser proof. Very nice and well worth the $$.

    Gary
    Last edited by Gillman; 01-13-2011 at 17:00.

  10. #20
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    Re: New Beam Black Packaging

    of course once the barrel drops below 50% there would be less barrel head influence than a horizontal barrel.
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