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  1. #1

    Martini: Calling Gary Gillman, et al...

    Kinda odd, really (and I admit to not surfing through ALL 23 pages of 'hits' for the word "martini" -- I leafed through the first and last several pages), but we don't seem to have a thread dedicated precisely to this ubiquitous drink.
    As many here know, I'm something of a traditionalist in all things -- which carries over to beverage alcohol -- so, to me, a martini is made with gin, not vodka. That said, I can't abide olives, but love maraschino cherries. You can guess where this is headed...
    I recently decided -- because of a dearth of other liquor in the house -- to assay my first martini. I used a c. 5:1 ratio Gordon's gin:dry Noilly Prat/no garnish. I liked it. Thereafter, I added some cherries, and switched to basic Seagram's gin. I still like it, but am out of gin (to be rectified during tomorrow's liquor-store shift).
    So, lend me some other takes, with the proviso that I may well ignore them (but others mayn't).
    Tim

  2. #2
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    Re: Martini: Calling Gary Gillman, et al...

    You don't like olives as a texture or as a flavor? If a whole olive doesn't strike you add olive brine to your Martini, I think it really gives it a depth. I have done Jalepenos and capers as well, then there is a Gibson with onion.

  3. #3

    Re: Martini: Calling Gary Gillman, et al...

    Quote Originally Posted by snowrs View Post
    You don't like olives as a texture or as a flavor?..
    Flavor -- yech!
    I'm okay with the cherries, even if no one else is. Plain is fine, too.
    Tim

  4. #4
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    Re: Martini: Calling Gary Gillman, et al...

    Ya know, Tim, I've been havin' a hankerin' for martinis, as we've been the beneficiaries of some terrific weather here, of late. I like a good martini, sitting out in the back on a warmish late afternoon. Our buddy, Jeff Yeast, turned me on to a great addition to the standard martini...coat the glass with a couple of shakes of Worcestershire sauce, before pouring your mixture. Makes it savory and oh, so, delicious.

    BTW, looking forward to experimenting with the Corsairs Gin in a martini. It's much more herbal than most of the junipery ones out there. A nice change of pace, and I think it will make for a good one.
    JOE

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    "Every bottle is its own learning experience." -- Sensei Ox-sama

  5. #5
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    Re: Martini: Calling Gary Gillman, et al...

    I also like No 10 with Noilly at about a 4:1 with a shake of bitters as well.

  6. #6
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    Re: Martini: Calling Gary Gillman, et al...

    Tim! Many thanks, first, for your generous remarks on the BOTY thread, much appreciated as were Smokeless Joe's and those of all who posted there.

    Libby calls Martinis Martoonis, a nomenclature that is second nature to me now.

    I agree with your approach to the Martooni except perhaps for the cherry.

    Gin is a sine qua non - for me. 4:1 is about exactly right, to the vermouth of course. I find olive a good addition, the slight briny note, similar in its way to Jeff Yeast's Worcestershire addition, fits in well with the dryness of the Martooni.

    However a cherry sounds interesting, I will try this before long.

    Joe, Corsair makes an excellent Martini. Ask Tony, or Gary Hodder. We made one according to the Bond recipe of mixing mostly gin with some vodka and then some white vermouth. Actually, Bond/Fleming called for Lillet, which I couldn't find in Houston, so we used Martini white vermouth. For this one though, we agreed, or Mr. Hodder was so persuaded, that a minimal amount of vermouth won't work - you need more, something like 3:1 liquor to vermouth or even more vermouth than that.

    Such was the judgment (using that term relatively) of the Faculty at Randy's that night.

    Gary

  7. #7
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    Lightbulb Re: Martini: Calling Gary Gillman, et al...

    For me, a martini is a quick and simple affair. I usually just make mine in a measuring cup! I have my olives ready in my cocktail glass. I add the gin and vermouth to the cup, add ice cubes, stir for about 30 seconds, and strain into the glass. That's it.

    I prefer regular Beefeater or regular Bombay gin to the fancier types. In the no-man's-land of Alabama, I have to take whatever I can get for vermouth, but it is usually Cinzano. And I like a 4:1 or 3:1 ratio. I used to make them "bone dry" at 6:1, but I have found that more vermouth really opens up the cocktail flavors.

    I drink it fairly quickly, too, so it remains cold.

    Tim
    Last edited by ratcheer; 02-16-2011 at 06:16.
    Self-Styled Whisky Connoisseur

  8. #8
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    Re: Martini: Calling Gary Gillman, et al...

    I am not the much of a fan of martinis but can enjoy them, and as a cocktail purist I agree they should be made with Gin.

    I like Plymouth, and occasionaly Bombay Saphirre (junipery). I like about a 4:1 ratio sometimes a little more, 5:1 is too dry for me and I like vermouth.

    Noily Prat is what I use also, if you want to really step it up use some Dolin although Prat is fine (Dolin is a little pricey and if you're not a vermouth fan and like dry martinis then don't bother).

    A suggestion I have for you is the classic garnish of lemon peel. Channel knife some peel, trim the pith. Twist over your glass and rub the rind around the rim and drop it in.

    Also another thing that I have gotten from some cocktail martini fans but haven't tried...

    Throw orange bitters in your martini... totally new drink.
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  9. #9
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    Re: Martini: Calling Gary Gillman, et al...

    The martini is probably one of the most bastardized cocktails on the planet, and there's a bit of a trend now to going back to how it was properly made.

    Aside from all the crazy concoctions and vodka inspired stuff "appletini, chocotini etc..." The biggest one was the omiting and less dependence on using vermouth.

    So much so that you went to a bar sometimes and saw some guy make a martini, throw a drop of vermouth in a glass, or pretend to then stupidly wave it around like some production, and the fill a drink completely with vodka. So what you got was chilled vodka, and olives.

    Now people are starting to realise vermouth has a purpose in a drink and are increasing the measurements and going back to how this was properly made. Also once you open a bottle of vermouth, use it up and store it in your fridge. It's like wine, it doesn't keep once you open it, and also is why you got a lot of bad martinis with vermouth in bars. The stuff sat on the shelf for months and then would get used way past its prime and people wouldn't like it.
    Visit the search for glory in the bottle: http://imbibehour.blogspot.com/
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  10. #10
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    Re: Martini: Calling Gary Gillman, et al...

    I garnish with unbruised rosemary sprig as my favorite.
    I don't necessarily need a snack with a martini (olives, stuffed olives, onion, caperberry, pickled cherry tomato, pickled garlic clove) but often do.

    I've fallen for Old Raj Gin that has a hint of color and flavor from Saffron.

    If shaking "cracks" the gin, I like mine shattered with slivers of ice, served up.

    Rimming the glass with various citrus adds an interesting note.

    I also add less than a drop of Worcestershire to a shaker of more than one martini. ( I like the briny but not the clovey, tamarindy)

    Burnt citrus peel oil sprayed over the finished cocktail is another "twist" on the twist. Lime is my preferred peel.

    (see here http://www.thespir.it/articles/bartender-bootcamp/#)

    Occasionally I serve them OTR, chilled in the shaker and served over a single large ice thingy (cube, ball, muffin)

    I can't say that I do anything all the time,
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