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  1. #21

    Re: Well, I guess this means Islay malts are out...

    Quote Originally Posted by Robmo View Post
    Not sure about the Monticello reference there, as I thought Jefferson built it, lived there and fathered several children there!..
    It wasn't built, however, before he existed -- which was my point, apparently unrealized. I was trying to state that an appreciation of single malt may well pre-suppose a prior appreciation of bourbon.
    Tim

  2. #22
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    Re: Well, I guess this means Islay malts are out...

    Talisker is a peaty scotch, even though it's from Skye instead of Islay, but it is less argumentative than Laphroaig. I adored the Laphroaig 15 I bought in Scotland many years ago. I guess they've moved to 18 instead of 15 now because Beam thinks that's a better scotch age.

    Talisker 10 is what I drink when I drink Scotch, but I suspect that's in large part because I've been there (although I've also been to Glenfiddich and Glenmorangie and a few others, so it's only part of the reason).

  3. #23
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    Re: Well, I guess this means Islay malts are out...

    Quote Originally Posted by TNbourbon View Post
    It wasn't built, however, before he existed -- which was my point, apparently unrealized. I was trying to state that an appreciation of single malt may well pre-suppose a prior appreciation of bourbon.
    To change the subject slightly, Jefferson was a beer and wine drinker and didn't exactly have warm and fuzzy feelings about whiskey...

    "I wish to see this beverage become common instead of the whiskey which kills one-third of our citizens and ruins their families."

    and

    "Beer, if drank with moderation, softens the temper, cheers the spirit, and promotes health."

    "Wine from long habit has become an indispensable for my health."

    ....

    Compare to Lincoln: "You just find out, to oblige me, what brand of whiskey Grant drinks, because I want to send a barrel of it to each one of my generals."

    ---

    which raises the interesting question of why Jefferson's Reserve features a likeness of the third president and architect of Monticello on their bottles...Knob Creek would appear to have the more authentic marketing angle.

  4. #24
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    Re: Well, I guess this means Islay malts are out...

    Balvenie Doublewood was one of my first steps-up from 'Fiddich and Glenlivet, and I still enjoy it immensely. Talisker 10 is another fine choice, as is Highland Park 12.

    I'll echo the advice that you hold onto the Lap. I was in almost the exact same position as you: Lap Quarter Cask was one of my first scotch pours, and I almost swore the stuff off for good. Now, I really enjoy the peated scotches and hope you will too someday.

  5. #25
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    Re: Well, I guess this means Islay malts are out...

    Quote Originally Posted by roostercogburn View Post
    Balvenie Doublewood was one of my first steps-up from 'Fiddich and Glenlivet, and I still enjoy it immensely. Talisker 10 is another fine choice, as is Highland Park 12.

    I'll echo the advice that you hold onto the Lap. I was in almost the exact same position as you: Lap Quarter Cask was one of my first scotch pours, and I almost swore the stuff off for good. Now, I really enjoy the peated scotches and hope you will too someday.
    My experience and sentiments exactly, Rooster. My relatives in Scotland hit me with all the Islays right off the bat and, for most folks anyway, that's a sure misstep for the novice scotch drinker. I was really put off by the intense flavors/aromas and the peat in particular but my gradual move from Johnnie Walker Black to Balvenie Doublewood to Highland Park 12 (an all-time favorite of mine) paved the way to a full appreciation of all things Islay (and Skye). Keep in mind that Laphroaig, in some respects, is unique even among Islays and all other single malts for that matter. The strong presence of brine, iodine, etc. gives it a "medicinal" (for lack of a better word) character that is hard to find in other malts, at least to the degree that you'll find in Laphroaig. Nowadays, I can't get enough of the stuff but it was a long, slow process that eventually brought me there. Give it time and try some others before passing final judgment on the Laphroaig. You may be surprised by how much you enjoy it someday!
    "I distrust a man who says 'when.' He's got to be careful not to drink too much, because he's not to be trusted when he does." Sydney Greenstreet

  6. #26
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    Re: Well, I guess this means Islay malts are out...

    Quote Originally Posted by TNbourbon View Post
    I was trying to state that an appreciation of single malt may well pre-suppose a prior appreciation of bourbon.
    For me, it was backwards - I started out on Scotch, got hooked, and very quickly tried out some Islay (10 yr. Laphroaig) and fell instantly in love - it was the peaty, medicinal, bold flavor that hooked me on whisk(e)y.

    It was some time later that I could stomach Bourbon (oh the horror that it was so). I always kept a bottle of WT101 around for "mixing" and we'd try it straight from time to time and found it... repulsive!... Right up until we didn't! One day it was suddenly really, really good!

    So, in my case Peat was the gateway to the world of whisk(e)y, and the love of Rye came next, and shortly after Bourbon.

    Thanks for letting me share - and don't think less of me because I love Scotch. I'm trying to drink more bourbon now that I'm in Texas.

  7. #27
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    Re: Well, I guess this means Islay malts are out...

    Quote Originally Posted by timd View Post
    For me, it was backwards - I started out on Scotch, got hooked, and very quickly tried out some Islay (10 yr. Laphroaig) and fell instantly in love - it was the peaty, medicinal, bold flavor that hooked me on whisk(e)y.

    It was some time later that I could stomach Bourbon (oh the horror that it was so). I always kept a bottle of WT101 around for "mixing" and we'd try it straight from time to time and found it... repulsive!... Right up until we didn't! One day it was suddenly really, really good!

    So, in my case Peat was the gateway to the world of whisk(e)y, and the love of Rye came next, and shortly after Bourbon.

    Thanks for letting me share - and don't think less of me because I love Scotch. I'm trying to drink more bourbon now that I'm in Texas.
    A similar story that I experienced. Started with single malt Scotch, first bottle purchased was Highland Park 12, 2nd was Balvenie 12DW and the 3rd was Laphoaig 12. I have since blasted off with several more bottles of Scotch from various distilleries and expanded into world whisk(e)y including Bourbon's and Ryes. Love it all.

    Great to have a cabinet stocked with various profiles of flavor in order to compare, share and satisfy any mood.

  8. #28
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    Re: Well, I guess this means Islay malts are out...

    Quote Originally Posted by HP12 View Post
    first bottle purchased was Highland Park 12
    My first purchased Scotch too! It's a great gateway Scotch.

    Lots of folks mention Talisker 10 (I've killed quite a few bottles of that, I especially love Distillers Edition and the 18), and if you get a kick out of the spicy rye quality of Bourbon, then I could see it being a hit - but if you are into wheaters, I'm afraid the pepper/spice would be more off-putting than the smoke!

    Black & white pepper are big parts of the Talisker profile. It's also fairly dry and not terribly sweet. Great stuff, to be sure, but I'd look at a Caol Ila or a peated Highlander for the bourbon-rich smoothness. A sherried & peated Scotch could be a hit, too (this style is my fave of any type of whisk(e)y - sweet & smokey, with a rich full body and not too dry)

  9. #29
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    Re: Well, I guess this means Islay malts are out...

    Quote Originally Posted by timd View Post
    My first purchased Scotch too! It's a great gateway Scotch.

    Lots of folks mention Talisker 10 (I've killed quite a few bottles of that, I especially love Distillers Edition and the 18), and if you get a kick out of the spicy rye quality of Bourbon, then I could see it being a hit - but if you are into wheaters, I'm afraid the pepper/spice would be more off-putting than the smoke!

    Black & white pepper are big parts of the Talisker profile. It's also fairly dry and not terribly sweet. Great stuff, to be sure, but I'd look at a Caol Ila or a peated Highlander for the bourbon-rich smoothness. A sherried & peated Scotch could be a hit, too (this style is my fave of any type of whisk(e)y - sweet & smokey, with a rich full body and not too dry)
    Yep, I have had the Tali 10 and have a bottle of it along with Tali 18 in the bunker. Take a look a my cabinet. I feel it's a fairly diverse selection for someone who only revisited whisk(e)y world (neat) this past fall for the first time in 25 years, other than drinking whiskey in mixed drinks!

    http://www.connosr.com/members/hp12/

  10. #30
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    Re: Well, I guess this means Islay malts are out...

    Based on world wide scotch sales (90% blended, 10% single malts, according to an article just read) it would seem that most of the world starts with scotch before trying bourbon (if they try it at all).

    I will definitely keep an open mind to the Islay malts but I'd like to explore more blends, Speysides and Highlands before coming back to the Islays. And there's so much bourbon, rye, Irish and Japanese malt I have yet to try! Thanks again for all the great advice from everyone.

 

 

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