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  1. #41
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    Re: Leaching of Lead into Whiskey from Ceramic Decater Glazing

    Eric is it possible to PDF the report that they gave you?
    You can find me in chat most nights on days ending with the letter y!

  2. #42
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    Re: Leaching of Lead into Whiskey from Ceramic Decater Glazing

    When did lead solder go out of fashion? I would like to see a test of bottled bourbon from the same era. I do know solder is used in distilleries.

  3. #43
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    Re: Leaching of Lead into Whiskey from Ceramic Decater Glazing

    Quote Originally Posted by tmckenzie View Post
    When did lead solder go out of fashion? I would like to see a test of bottled bourbon from the same era. I do know solder is used in distilleries.
    I don't believe the issue is lead solder, but rather lead flux that was used in glazing of ceramics (like decanters). I think the use of lead flux for glazing ended in the 70's, but I don't know for sure - perhaps earlier. I'll do some looking.

    The transition from lead solders to lead-free I believe is still occurring, but that began much later (at least in the surface-mount technology industry) - it began sometime in the mid- to late-90's if I remember correctly, and the EU has requirements on when you needed to be lead-free (don't remember specifics).
    Mark

  4. #44
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    Re: Leaching of Lead into Whiskey from Ceramic Decater Glazing

    Quote Originally Posted by sutton View Post
    I don't believe the issue is lead solder, but rather lead flux that was used in glazing of ceramics (like decanters). I think the use of lead flux for glazing ended in the 70's, but I don't know for sure - perhaps earlier. I'll do some looking.

    The transition from lead solders to lead-free I believe is still occurring, but that began much later (at least in the surface-mount technology industry) - it began sometime in the mid- to late-90's if I remember correctly, and the EU has requirements on when you needed to be lead-free (don't remember specifics).
    As far as I can determine the first regulation was 1986 in California. Federal regulation didn't occur until the 2000s. The owner of the Mad Platter (a local ceramic shop) said it was used until the 1990s. Finally the tour guide at Wild Turkey told me they were discontinued there in the 80s because of the lead but lead was used up until the end.

    Lead solder was a problem with moon shine because they often used car radiators which have a lot of solder.

  5. #45
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    Re: Leaching of Lead into Whiskey from Ceramic Decater Glazing

    OF BiB ca. 1988 and WLW 117.9.

    Very favorable comparison with WLW being a little fuller and hotter with the OF BiB being sweeter.

    Both are fantastic!

  6. #46
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    Re: Leaching of Lead into Whiskey from Ceramic Decater Glazing

    Very informative thread. I studied chemistry as well, so I find these details interesting

    Luckily ?! I never really been drinking whisky from decanter's

    How would you reckon the lead to be damaging in these amounts?

    Also given the fact that you aren't consuming this probably, but more likely to be sampling it ?

    Steffen

  7. #47
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    Re: Leaching of Lead into Whiskey from Ceramic Decater Glazing

    Quote Originally Posted by macdeffe View Post
    How would you reckon the lead to be damaging in these amounts?

    Also given the fact that you aren't consuming this probably, but more likely to be sampling it ?

    Steffen
    I've been doing some reading about this on the 'net - there is some conflicting information, but from what I read it seems that lead is not good in any quantity - the body has a tough time getting rid of it. It seems that chronic exposure is probably worse than a one-time exposure, as lead accumulates in the soft tissue and bones, which acts as a sort of reservoir to replenish lead levels in the blood stream.

    The body does get rid of it when in the bloodstream, again, some conflicting info, but it seems that the half-life is somewhere between 25 and 40 days. Then again, other information said that the body can't really rid itself of lead ...

    I'm sure the levels are variable as well in each decanter - some probably have low levels, others probably higher than the one tested here.
    Last edited by sutton; 08-07-2011 at 18:25.
    Mark

  8. #48
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    Re: Leaching of Lead into Whiskey from Ceramic Decater Glazing

    Here's some additional information from the Mass. State Labor and Workforce Development web-site:

    http://www.mass.gov/?pageID=elwdterm...hhaz&csid=Elwd


    What Happens to Lead in the Body?

    Once lead gets into the body, it is not used in any way to benefit the body. It is absorbed and distributed throughout the body. The amount the body absorbs depends on the route of exposure. In general, an adult will absorb 10-15% of the lead in the digestive system, while children and pregnant women can absorb up to 50%. People will absorb more lead if they are fasting or if their diet is lacking in iron or calcium.

    When lead is inhaled, about 30%-50% of the particles will reach the lungs, depending on the size of the particle. Large particles land in the upper respiratory tract, where they get trapped by the mucous lining and moved out by hair-like objects (called cilia). Unfortunately, the mucous is often swallowed, allowing these large particles to then go into the digestive system.

    Smaller particles can reach deeper in the lungs and from there be absorbed into the bloodstream. This means that when there is burning or welding on lead-painted surfaces, the lead fumes can be especially dangerous. The small particles created as a fume will reach the blood if they are inhaled.

    Once lead is in the blood, some of it moves into soft tissues (organs such as the brain and kidneys). The total amount of lead that is stored in the body is called the "body burden". In adults, bones and teeth contain about 95% of the body burden. Lead that is stored in the bones can leave them and enter the blood and then the soft tissue. This can damage the organs or the blood's ability to make red blood cells. This trend may increase during pregnancy, breast-feeding and osteoporosis (the process of weakening of the skeleton in old age). It can also happen when lead is removed from the blood through medical treatment (called chelation).

    How Long Does Lead Stay in the Body?

    Lead stays in the body for different periods of time, depending on where it is. Half of the lead in the blood will be excreted in 25 days (this is called the "half-life"). In soft tissues, it takes 40 days for half of the lead to be excreted. In bones and teeth it takes much longer, up to 10 years or longer.

    Since lead is stored in the body, a person can get poisoned from exposure to just small amounts of lead over a long period of time (called chronic exposure). You do not need to get exposed to just large doses of lead to be poisoned (called acute exposure). It can take months or years for the body to get rid of lead. A person will continue to be exposed to lead internally even after the actual exposure to lead stops
    Mark

  9. #49
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    Re: Leaching of Lead into Whiskey from Ceramic Decater Glazing

    Well, ignorance is bliss eh? I have a few Beam decanters from the late 60's through the 70's... I suppose that they are not safe to drink if I'm convinced that taking 1000 times the acceptable limit of lead is bad for me. Then again, just about everything we ingest on a daily basis has something in it that's bad for you. Is lead worse? Clearly, there are plenty of people on this board who've downed much more lead-tainted bourbon than I have, and you all are still kicking.

    Thanks, wrip, for your reporting. Or should I say damn you!

    Any MDs that could chime in on this subject would be most appreciated!

  10. #50
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    Re: Leaching of Lead into Whiskey from Ceramic Decater Glazing

    My question: I stopped in a small liquor store a couple of months ago and they had a bunch of Evan Williams Commemorative Earthstone Jugs cheap ($10). I bought several thinking at least they could be used as gifts. Now I wonder if they are safe. Don't really want to do my family in!

 

 

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