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  1. #11
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    Re: Another question ...

    >ould that barrel be called a single barrel or is it a small batch ?

    Is there a legal definition of "single barrel", or is it just a marketing term?
    I suppose you're making a claim that the contents of the bottle come from
    a single barrel, but if you wanted to be sneaky, you might be able to vat
    together 20 barrels of rather different character, and then pour the mix
    back into the barrels, and sell 'em all as "single barrel".

    I seem to recall that there is no legal definition of "small batch", so you
    could probably call anything you want "small batch".

    Tim

  2. #12
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Re: Another question ...

    All stated in exemplary fashion. From the point of view of the taster, once the categories are understood - and even when they are not - the ability to come up with different combinations and flavors has always been part of the drinking scene. Making a cocktail is just a way to get a broader palette of tastes in the glass, for various reasons of course. Beer drinkers always did the same with their half and half, porter (originally a mix of three beers) and so forth. As I once said, in the broadest sense, everything is a blend, but I agree that unless terms are used in a generally accepted way it makes it harder to discuss one's practices meaningfully. The existing legal categories, too, are a product of specific historical events and are not unchangeable, in time they will yield to new circumstances, but the basics of taste don't change of course. One can see this from the other end of the telescope in Byrn's book, Complete Practical Distiller (1875). He does not use the terms "bourbon", "rye whiskey", "blended whiskey", and other terms such as we use today but the basics essentially were the same then as now - do we want real, aged (what is now termed straight) whiskey; if so, should we make it from barley, rye, corn or other grains; if we don't want spirit that tastes of the grain it is made from, how do we make a neutral-tasting spirit; how do we flavour it, to what ends?, etc.

    I guess I am trying in a modest way to reduce the prejudice against blended whiskey (American Blended or Canadian) because to me it just another stage in the taste spectrum, so is mixing straight bourbons with a little rye, so is the distiller mixing casks of his same or different-mash straight bourbon to arrive at a uniform 10 year old bourbon whiskey, and so forth.

    Cy

  3. #13
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    Re: Another question ... and Jacob\'s Well curiosity

    Did you ever find one? Let me know, I have one.

    Cheers,
    Marvin

  4. #14
    Bourbonian of the Year 2011
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    Re: Another question ...

    Not to contradict myself, but tonight I had some anonymous Canadian blend in a bar downtown - it might have been a U.S. blend because some of that ends up illicitly in our bars and clubs as Canadian. Anyway this whisky tasted like someone took Damask curtains from a room that had been shut since 1928, shredded them, macerated them in cheap vodka and added a cup of cheap perfume to round off the taste-notes. Bad news! And to add insult to injury I was told this concoction was Crown Royal which it most assuredly was not. Still, there are many good blends out there. And failing finding one to one's taste, one can get out the cocktail shaker and work up one's own version from a set of good sound whiskeys, other spirits and flavorings.

    Cy

  5. #15
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
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    Re: Another question ...

    Neither "single barrel" nor "small batch" is defined in ATF regs, but there is a pretty universal understanding of what "single barrel" means. "Small batch," on the other hand, is so vague that it really doesn't mean anything.

  6. #16
    Bourbonian of the Year 2003 and Super Moderator
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    Re: Another question ... and Jacob\'s Well curiosity

    </font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
    I find the most humorous thing about the Jacob's Well experiment the attempt to play off the cachet of the word "Micro."

    [/QUOTE]

    That may well be, They change the movie they play at the American Outpost in Clermont every so often . One of the older ones from 10 or 15 years ago, pointed out the fact that they run off in a single batch now more whiskey than Ol' Jacob made in his entire life. From that standpoint the " Original Micro Bourbon" might fit. It wasn't a concept that Mr. Beam was aware of, he was steadily cranking out a barrel or 3 a day. You are probably correct , They were going after Yuppie Dollars.

  7. #17
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    Jan 2003
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    South Jersey
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    Re: Jacob\'s Well

    I saw a bottle at a local (Southern NJ) liquor shop about a month or two ago. Based on the amount of dust it was collecting, it's probably still there. Wasn't cheap, either. I recall it being priced in the $30's. If you're really interested, let me know.

  8. #18
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    Bloomington, IN
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    Small Batch

    As a "marketing type" I can attest that these terms (Single Barrel, Small Batch) are marketing terms.

    A "small batch" to Jim Beam or Brown Forman is very different than a "small batch" to Buffalo Trace.

    It reminds me of terminology in the beer business. Microbrew used to mean "micro" as in very small operation. When the big brewers realized that 'microbrew" was a hot term they started using it on many beers that certainly don't qualify as "micro" -- more like "mid-sized."

    Oh, well. Still the small batch stuff tends to often be a bit more tasty than the high volume stuff.

    Greg

  9. #19
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    Re: Another question ...\"mingling\"

    In the midst of your post you stated (asked) "I now wonder if this is done at the warehouses also". The answer is absolutely are barrels combined -- officially called "mingling." Many times the barrels are the same age. But from what distillers have told me, they clearly can use an older barrel in a bourbon with a younger age claim. In other words, they can use an 8-year-old barrel in a 7-year aged product.

    In posts about combining bourbons at home, posters have used the common term "mixing." In bourbon land that term means adding another spirit. That's why when barrels of bourbon are combined they say "mingled."

    I guess I don't mix with my friends I mingle with them

    Greg

  10. #20
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
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    Re: Another question ...\"mingling\"

    Greg is right. "Mingling" is the preferred term among the distillers. Maybe "fraternizing" would be good. How about "socializing"? Anybody else have any good ideas?

 

 

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