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  1. #1
    Taster
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    Nov 2006
    Location
    Houston, Texas
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    69

    BTAC and Van Winkle nonsense

    I apologize if the title of this thread offends anyone: it is not meant to.

    Basically, I have come to the conclusion that the time and effort I spend and have spent waiting for the release of said whiskies and driving around looking for said whiskies just isn't worth it to me.

    I've had the pleasure to be able to drink good bourbon for about 35 years now. Old Weller Antique 107 in the gold-veined bottle was a favorite of mine back in the 1970s and I still drink the current version today. Old Grand-Dad bonded, Wild Turkey 101 and Rye 101, Old Charter of all ages; all these were favorites of mine over the years and remain so today.

    Then about 10 years ago I found a bottle of Old Rip Van Winkle 107 at my liquor store...and I was hooked. I really enjoyed the taste of the whiskey and decided to go and pick up another bottle, and consequently drank it on a semi-regular basis. Life was good.

    Then the Bourbon Trend hit. Old Rip was gone from the shelves and when it could be found the price had increased exponentially. Then BTAC hit and I decided to try these whiskies, but the same thing happened. NONE could be found unless I haunted the liquor store every day, trying to scoop one or two bottles up before the "hobbyists" hit the store and bought everything in sight, leaving empty shelves and "We're sorry, but a customer came and bought all of it!" statements from the staff. What a pain in the neck!

    So, I've decided to go back to my old regular pours and stop worrying about tracking down Birthday Bourbons, barrel-proof ryes, and 140.6 proof bourbons. I just want a good drink of bourbon that tastes the same, day in and day out, in the same old-fashioned bottles. No gimmicks for me! I can have wheated bourbons, rye bourbons, and heavy corn bourbons just with the middle and lower shelf whiskies. And I can generally find them without too much effort.

    Now, if they can only leave my Old Charter 10 and Old Grand-Dad bonded alone for say the next thirty-five years or so, I think I can be happy!

    Anyone else feel the same?

  2. #2
    Connoisseur
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    Jan 2010
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    927

    Re: BTAC and Van Winkle nonsense

    I feel exactly the same way.

  3. #3
    Enthusiast
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    Mar 2011
    Location
    Reston, VA
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    360

    Re: BTAC and Van Winkle nonsense

    Amen. There are far too many excellent whiskies at reasonable prices out there waiting for me to enjoy them. If one of the exclusive bottles falls in my lap, great; if not, I'm not losing any sleep.

  4. #4
    Trippah and Admin
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    Feb 2008
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    Northeast Ahia
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    4,701

    Re: BTAC and Van Winkle nonsense

    My BTAC chase ended this year as I have tired of battling the ebay flippers and profiteers.

    You are correct that there is plenty of great bourbon out there that doesn't require maximum effort and exquisite timing to procure.
    My name is Joel Goodson. I deal in human fulfillment.
    I grossed over eight thousand dollars in one night. Time of your life, huh kid?

  5. #5
    Guru
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    Sep 2001
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    Pelham, AL
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    3,892

    Thumbs up Re: BTAC and Van Winkle nonsense

    I also agree, fitzharry.

    Tim
    Self-Styled Whisky Connoisseur

  6. #6

    Re: BTAC and Van Winkle nonsense

    excellent guys! more for me. Just had some stagg last night and wlw the night before. i have found in my short 48 years the best comes to those that work hard and wait. No matter what the situation. The btac stuff is hard to get. With good reason. Stagg costs me under $60. hard to complain about a whisky that was judged the best in the world for $60. If you have to pay over $100 on ebay, so be it. I have paid over $200 for some bourbons and scotches on the shelf.

    bottom line, the best things in life are usually rare and expensive. If the stuff wasn't worth it, people wouldn't pay. This isn't beany babies we are talking about.
    Last edited by PappyVW23; 10-24-2011 at 06:02.

  7. #7
    Guru
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    Chicago suburbs
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    Re: BTAC and Van Winkle nonsense

    Quote Originally Posted by PappyVW23 View Post
    excellent guys! more for me. Just had some stagg last night and wlw the night before. i have found in my short 48 years the best comes to those that work hard and wait. No matter what the situation. The btac stuff is hard to get. With good reason. Stagg costs me under $60. hard to complain about a whisky that was judged the best in the world for $60. If you have to pay over $100 on ebay, so be it. I have paid over $200 for some bourbons and scotches on the shelf.

    bottom line, the best things in life are usually rare and expensive. If the stuff wasn't worth it, people wouldn't pay. This isn't beany babies we are talking about.
    I can see where you are coming from but I think what others are talking about here goes beyond simply having the fortitude to stick it out until the so-called "rare treasures" present themselves on the shelf. To be sure, Stagg at $60 is a great deal to some folks, if you are lucky enough to find it in your area at that price. But when you are paying in excess of $100 simply because something is hard to get (which is different in my book than something that is truly "rare," such as many single malts), I always ask myself, "Is this actually better whiskey than those enjoyable bottles I already have at home that cost me half the price?" As noted by others, the prices of many current BTAC bottlings have been driven through the roof by hobbyists like ourselves and profiteers out to make a few extra bucks off our kind, not because the whiskey being produced is necessarily the best whiskey out there. And so I question the notion that "expensive" and "hard to get" translates to "the best things" when my personal whiskey drinking experience has ultimately proven otherwise.

    Looking back upon it, I would say that my bourbon journey has nearly come full circle, in that I went from commonly available whiskeys in the under $30 price range to much pricier limited production bottlings (and dusties) that cost considerably more and now back to some point in between. To each his own I guess, but I'm no longer willing to expend the energy or pay exorbitant prices to get so-called gems when incredible whiskey can be found at a fraction of the price at my local liquor store. These days, if I had $200 burning a hole in my pocket, I'd spend $150 of it on a nice day trip to Kentucky and the rest on a good bottle to bring home. But that's just me!
    "I distrust a man who says 'when.' He's got to be careful not to drink too much, because he's not to be trusted when he does." Sydney Greenstreet

  8. #8
    Taster
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Houston, Texas
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    69

    Re: BTAC and Van Winkle nonsense

    Quote Originally Posted by unclebunk View Post
    I can see where you are coming from but I think what others are talking about here goes beyond simply having the fortitude to stick it out until the so-called "rare treasures" present themselves on the shelf. To be sure, Stagg at $60 is a great deal to some folks, if you are lucky enough to find it in your area at that price. But when you are paying in excess of $100 simply because something is hard to get (which is different in my book than something that is truly "rare," such as many single malts), I always ask myself, "Is this actually better whiskey than those enjoyable bottles I already have at home that cost me half the price?" As noted by others, the prices of many current BTAC bottlings have been driven through the roof by hobbyists like ourselves and profiteers out to make a few extra bucks off our kind, not because the whiskey being produced is necessarily the best whiskey out there. And so I question the notion that "expensive" and "hard to get" translates to "the best things" when my personal whiskey drinking experience has ultimately proven otherwise.

    Looking back upon it, I would say that my bourbon journey has nearly come full circle, in that I went from commonly available whiskeys in the under $30 price range to much pricier limited production bottlings (and dusties) that cost considerably more and now back to some point in between. To each his own I guess, but I'm no longer willing to expend the energy or pay exorbitant prices to get so-called gems when incredible whiskey can be found at a fraction of the price at my local liquor store. These days, if I had $200 burning a hole in my pocket, I'd spend $150 of it on a nice day trip to Kentucky and the rest on a good bottle to bring home. But that's just me!
    Exactly.

    PappyVW23: Yes, I've spent $200.00 on bottles of fine XO cognac, $300.00 on a meal for two at one of my local great restaurants (and both the cognac and the meal were excellent), and $79.99 on bottles of BTAC (the going price here in Houston, when it can be found), but these are not things I choose to do every day or even every week. These purchases, to me, are special occasion purchases.

    As Happyhour24x7 stated, if one of these Van Winkles or BTACs fell into my lap then that's great; but I am no longer going to worry about having enough of them bunkered. It's just not worth it to me.

    (For what it's worth, I still have 11 ORVW 10/107s, 7 PVW 15/107s, 2 2006 & 3 2007 Stagg, 2006 Handy, etc., in my pantry.)

    I think I can also say that most of us on this board are probably old enough (and weathered enough!) to know the virtues of patience, so that statement is a no starter in a conversation...to me. As an example, I hunt birds with Browning Sweet Sixteen semi-automatic shotguns, and I waited 37 years before I bought my first one because I couldn't afford one before. I now have five. So please, don't talk to me about patience.

    And in a way, yes, I think this issue is EXACTLY like beanie babies. The next big trend to hit will have everyone scrambling for the exits to catch on to the next wonderful ultra-bourbon or ueber-rye. And like any drinker of better whiskies I would be intrigued enough to buy a bottle of it to try, too; but I won't worry any longer about driving all over Houston's 700 square miles to find it unless it happens to be available in the store in which I'm standing at that moment.
    Last edited by fitzharry; 10-24-2011 at 08:14.

  9. #9
    Disciple
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    Dec 2007
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    DelMarVa
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    1,867

    Re: BTAC and Van Winkle nonsense

    It's all about who you know. The higher up the chain the better.

  10. #10
    Disciple
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    Jan 2009
    Location
    NE OH
    Posts
    1,781

    Re: BTAC and Van Winkle nonsense

    I'm getting closer to dropping out.

    I let go of the Pappy chase last year.

    Recently I have been thrilled with OWA 107 and the latest RITT BIB. If these $20 bottles keep producing like they have been I'll be a happy man.
    ~Robert BTOTY #2 2009

    GBS Member - 2011 Indoctrination

 

 

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