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  1. #1
    Bourbonian of the Year 2006
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    Recipes for Spent Grain

    The most recent issue of FROTH (Newsletter of the Brewers of Central Kentucky) has recipes for Spent Grain from Beer Mashing. I don't see why these can't be used for spent bourbon mash.

    Spent Grain Granola

    9 C Spent Grains
    1 ½C Rolled Oats
    1 ½C Chopped Almonds
    1C Sunflower Seeds
    1C Cashews
    1C Wheat Germ
    1C Sesame Seeds
    1C Raisins
    1C Dried Cranberries
    ¼C Blackstrap Molasses
    ¼C Barley Malt Syrup
    ½C Dark Maple Syrup
    1C Boiling Water
    2 Tsp Vanilla
    ¼ C Vegetable Oil

    Mix the grains, oats, nuts, seeds, wheat germ together. Mix the wet ingredients separately and then add to the dry ingredients. Withhold fruit.
    Pre-heat oven to 300. Spread mix out on baking sheets. Put in oven at 350 for 15 minutes, then turn down to 200 to finish drying. When done,
    add the dried fruit (Or add them into the oven with 5-10 minutes left)

    Great Barley Grain Granola

    1/4 cup margarine
    1/2 cup honey
    2 cups oatmeal (regular or quick)
    2 cups sunflower seeds (raw, unsalted)
    4 cups spent crystal malt
    3 tsp. cinnamon
    1 cup shredded or flaked coconut (optional)
    2/3 cup raisins

    In a large skillet with an oven-safe handle or 9-by-13 inch baking pan, melt the margarine and stir in the honey. Stir in all the remaining
    ingredients except the raisins. Bake in a preheated 350° F oven, stirring occasionally. Bake for 25 minutes or until lightly browned. Remove
    from the oven and stir in the raisins. Cool before placing in the storage container.


    Cinnamon-Coconut Crunch Spent Grain Granola
    Makes about 6 cups

    4 cups spent grains (or any cooked whole grain), squeeze out excess liquid – but make sure they’re still a little bit wet, not totally dry
    1/3 cup whole wheat flour
    3 tbsp cinnamon
    1/4 tsp sea salt
    1.5 cups unsweetened shredded coconut
    2 tbsp sesame seeds
    2 tbsp flaxseeds
    1/2 cup brown rice syrup
    2 tbsp coconut oil

    Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Line a large baking sheet with low sides with parchment paper. In a large bowl mix together the spent
    grains, coconut, sesame seeds, flaxseeds, brown rice syrup and coconut oil. In another bowl stir together the flour, cinnamon and salt. Mix
    the dry ingredients into the wet until fully combined. Spread evenly onto a baking sheet. Bake for 1 hour, stirring every 20 minutes. After 1
    hour reduce the heat to 275 degrees and bake 20-30 more minutes, stirring every 10 minutes until slightly crispy and not burned. Remove
    from the oven and once fully cooled store in a sealed container in the fridge. They will harden up and get really crispy in the fridge.


    Spent Grain Chocolate Chip Granola
    Makes 9 cups

    6 cups spent grains (or any cooked whole grain), squeeze out excess liquid – but make sure they’re still a bit wet, not dry
    1/2 cup whole wheat flour
    1/4 cup ground flax seed
    1 tbsp cinnamon
    1/4 tsp sea salt
    1 cup shredded unsweetened coconut
    1 cup dried cherries
    1 cup chocolate chips
    1/2 cup brown rice syrup (this works really well for clumps of granola, if you substitute in maple syrup or honey you make not end up with
    as many large clumps)
    1/4 cup vegetable oil

    Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Line a large baking sheet with low sides with parchment paper. In a large bowl mix together the spent
    grains, coconut, cherries, half the chocolate chips, brown rice syrup and vegetable oil. In another bowl stir together the flour, flax, cinnamon
    and salt. Mix the dry ingredients into the wet until fully combined. Spread evenly onto a baking sheet. Bake for 1 hour, stirring every 20
    minutes. After 1 hour reduce the heat to 275 degrees and bake another hour, stirring every 20 minutes until slightly crispy and not burned.
    Remove from the oven and top with the remaining chocolate chips. Once fully cooled store in a sealed container in the fridge. They will
    harden up and get really crispy in the fridge.
    brown rice syrup = half as sweet as ordinary table sugar. Substitutes: maple syrup (substitute 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons liquid for each cup
    of brown rice syrup) OR molasses (substitute 1/2 cup for each cup of brown rice syrup) OR honey (substitute 3/4 C honey plus 2 tablespoons
    liquid for every cup of brown rice syrup)

    Spent Grain Tortillas

    1 cup all-purpose flour
    1/2 cup of Dried Spent Grain
    1 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 tablespoon vegetable oil
    3/4 cup room temperature milk

    Using a coffee grinder, process dried spent grain until it becomes a fine powder. Combine with flour, baking powder, salt, and oil. Stir until
    mixture comes together, and then turn on to a flour surface and knead for two or three minutes. Place back into bowl, cover and rest for 15
    minutes. Divide it into eight equal portions, and let rest another ten minutes. Then, roll each portion into a very thin, flat circle on a floured
    work surface. Take care not to be too rough with your dough, or your tortillas may end up on the tough side. Heat an ungreased skillet over
    medium high heat for a few minutes. Place each tortilla on the skillet individually, and cook for 30-45 seconds on each side. Serve! Makes 8
    large or 16 small tortillas.

    Spent Grain Beer Bread

    3 cups all purpose flour
    1 cup wheat flour (could handle higher ratio of wheat
    2 tsp. salt
    2 tsp. yeast
    3 cups spent grain (put the grain in a coffee grinder or food processor and grind it up
    ¼ cup of sugar (can substitute honey, molasses or the malt syrup you used to brew)
    ¼ cup of butter or olive oil
    1 egg (Beaten)
    1 cup of milk (usually use less, depending on how wet the grain is)

    Mix together dry, then wet ingredients until dough pulls away from sides of bowl and all ingredients are incorporated. I use a Kitchen Aide
    with a dough hook–if you are mixing by hand you may want to make half the recipe the first time you make it to get a single large loaf as
    this large amount can be exhausting. Knead for 10 min by hand or 5 min by mixer. Shape into ball and let rise in oiled bowl until double–
    about 90 min. Punch down and divide. I usually get 3 average sized loaves out of this. Let it rise again in greased loaf pans or cookie sheet
    until doubled, (or slightly more as this is dense bread, takes about 1 hr.). Score top of loaves. Preheat oven. Bake at 350F for 40 min, until
    deep golden brown. I spritz my loaves with water just before going into the oven and again 2 min into baking to make a crunchier crust, but
    it’s not required. Rotate pans halfway through. Let cool for 30 min on baking rack before slicing

    Neal’s Real Barley Bread

    3 cups lukewarm water
    1/4 cup honey, molasses, or sugar
    1 cup dry milk
    4 cups whole-wheat flour
    2 eggs
    4 cups spent American crystal malt (wet)
    Yeast
    4 tsp. salt
    1/4 cup oil or butter
    1 egg (optional)
    1/4 cup water or milk (optional)
    Sesame or poppy seeds (optional)

    Put the malt and 11/2 cups of water in a blender or food processor and blend until liquefied. In a large bowl sprinkle the yeast over 11/2
    cups of water and stir to dissolve. Add the sweetener, dry milk, and eggs and mix well. Add the blended grains to the bowl and mix well.
    Gradually add enough flour to form a thick batter. Beat 100 strokes with a spoon. Cover the bowl with a damp cloth and let the sponge rise
    for about an hour or until at least double in bulk. Sprinkle the salt and pour the oil over the sponge. Fold into the sponge until well
    combined. Begin folding in the remaining flour until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl and it is difficult to manage with the
    spoon. Turn the 3 to 4 cups of dough onto a well-floured board and knead. Use as much additional flour as necessary to keep the dough
    from sticking to the board or your hands. Continue to knead for 10 or 15 minutes, until the dough is very smooth. Place the d ough in an oiled
    bowl, cover with a damp cloth, and let rise about an hour or until double in bulk. Punch the dough down with your fist 25 times. Cover and
    let rise again until doubled. (This step may be eliminated, but the loaf will be a little heavier.) Divide the dough into three equal pieces and
    shape into loaves. Place in well-oiled loaf pans. Cover and let rise until double in bulk. Optional: Beat the egg with the water or milk. Cut
    slits 1/2-inch deep in the tops of the loaves and brush with the egg wash. Sprinkle the loaves with the seeds. Bake in a preheated 350° F
    oven for about one hour. Remove from the pans and cool on a wire rack or across the tops of the loaf pans. Yield: 3 loaves
    Colonel Ed
    Bourbonian of the Year 2006

    Comissioned by Paul Patton, 1999

    "It ain't the booze that brings me in here, it's the solace it distills"

  2. #2
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
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    Re: Recipes for Spent Grain

    Have you (or anyone) ever seen a nutritional breakdown on spent grain? It's supposedly more nutritious than grain in its unspent state, but I don't know the details.

    Probably ten or more years ago now, there was an attempt to create a line of quick bread mixes based on distillery spent grain. If someone could hit on a really good use for the stuff--especially one that uses less energy to dry the slop--there is money to be made.

    Getting rid of stillage is a nuisance for the distilleries and even when they are willing to give it away, wet, they are increasingly having trouble finding farmers willing to take it. Apparently free feed isn't a compelling enough reason to place a big feed lot operation in Kentucky.

    Brown-Forman experimented with raising catfish on the distillery grounds in Shively. Even though the tanks were enclosed, the fish didn't care for Louisville's weather.
    Last edited by cowdery; 11-18-2011 at 14:26.

  3. #3
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    Re: Recipes for Spent Grain

    I saw somewhere it is 18 percent protien. I can tell you this, the farmer who takes ours wet, is glad to get it. He has some of the best looking cows around.

  4. #4
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
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    Re: Recipes for Spent Grain

    I keep urging microdistillers to do it the historic way--keep hogs or cattle themselves. Typically they would send the spent mash down a very long trough so it would be cool enough for the livestock to eat by the time it got to them, and so the pens didn't have to be right next to the distillery.

    I was told once by a Nelson County farmer that you can't feed wet slop to chickens because the trace amounts of alcohol are enough to get them drunk.

  5. #5
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    Re: Recipes for Spent Grain

    Quote Originally Posted by cowdery View Post
    I was told once by a Nelson County farmer that you can't feed wet slop to chickens because the trace amounts of alcohol are enough to get them drunk.
    No basting or marinating required, though...
    Mark Edwards - Proof of Sanity Forged Upon Request

  6. #6
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    Re: Recipes for Spent Grain

    Quote Originally Posted by cowdery View Post
    Have you (or anyone) ever seen a nutritional breakdown on spent grain? It's supposedly more nutritious than grain in its unspent state, but I don't know the details.
    I imagine it has to do with the breakdown of phytic acid and perhaps enzyme inhibitors.

    This ties in with the thread on whole grains.

    perusing one of my cookbooks I found this:

    ...All grains contain phytic acid (an organic acid in which phosphorous is bound) in the outer layer or bran. untreated phytic acid can combine with calcium, magnesium, copper, iron and especially zinc in the intestinal tract and block their absorption. This is why a diet high in unfermented whole grains may lead to serious mineral deficiencies and bone loss. The modern misguided practice of consuming large amounts of unprocessed bran often improves colon transit time at first but may lead to irritable bowl syndrome and, in the long term, many other adverse effects. Soaking allows enzymes, lactobacilli and other helpfully organisms to break down and neutralize phytic acid. As little as seven hours of soaking in warm acidulated water will neutralize a large portion of phytic acid in grains....

  7. #7
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    Re: Recipes for Spent Grain

    Being a millwright I've worked in quite a few feed mills. I've seen spent (dried) corn meal come in from ethanol distilleries, and even fish meal.

    The feed is ordered by customers and blended from several bins, additional supplements and sometimes medicines are added depending on what blend is ordered, and that of course, depends on what species is being fed and what stage of its life cycle its at.

    The point being, this stuff is down to a science.

    Surprisingly, or not so surprisingly if you give it some thought, free wet spent mash may not be a compelling enough reason to locate a feedlot near a distillery. Once apon a time it was. In fact many of the first large scale dairies were located near distilleries. But practices have changed.

    Change is not alwas bad. These first attempts at "factory farming" in the absence of modern sanitation methods and modern stainless steal which is easier to sanitize led to the swill milk scandals and that led to the very unnecessary practice of pasteurization in lue of certification and the greater emphases on sanitation and inspection needed for the proposed certification process.

    http://www.neatorama.com/2011/01/17/...lk-swill-milk/

    In the mid-1800s, it was common for whiskey and other distillers to run dairy and beef businesses on the side. The manufacture of grain alcohol require huge amounts of corn, rye, and other fresh grains, which are cooked into a mash and then distilled. Once that distillation is complete, the remaining “swill” can be discarded… or, as the distiller discovered, it can be fed to cows.
    Profit, not quality, was the priority with “swill herds.” As a result, conditions in many distillery-owned dairies were atrocious. The cows spent their entire lives tied up in tiny pens, which were rarely cleaned. They received no food other than the swill -and no fresh water at all, since distillers though there was already plenty of water in the swill.

  8. #8
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    Re: Recipes for Spent Grain

    Quote Originally Posted by cowdery View Post
    I keep urging microdistillers to do it the historic way--keep hogs or cattle themselves. Typically they would send the spent mash down a very long trough so it would be cool enough for the livestock to eat by the time it got to them, and so the pens didn't have to be right next to the distillery.

    I was told once by a Nelson County farmer that you can't feed wet slop to chickens because the trace amounts of alcohol are enough to get them drunk.

    We considered it, but it is so hard to find people who will work that I would wind up tending to the cows and i have enough to do already. And the state would have a fit probably.

  9. #9
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
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    Re: Recipes for Spent Grain

    I tried to talk the Mt. Vernon folks into doing it at Washington's distillery, since that's surely what they did in the day. They laughed.

  10. #10
    Bourbonian of the Year 2006
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    Re: Recipes for Spent Grain

    I think that drying reduces phytic acid.

    http://www.patentgenius.com/patent/4341805.html
    Colonel Ed
    Bourbonian of the Year 2006

    Comissioned by Paul Patton, 1999

    "It ain't the booze that brings me in here, it's the solace it distills"

 

 

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