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  1. #1
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    Curiosity question-- types of old rye?

    So, I'm going to pick up a few bottles of rye the next time I visit my friend in Delaware. The two Heaven Hill brands are Pikesville Maryland Rye, and Rittenhouse Menongehela Rye.

    Are they distinct styles? Or is it just to denote the lineage of the original distilleries before they went kaput?
    "Suppose he's got a pointed stick!?!"

    - Eric Idle, Monty Python's Flying Circus

  2. #2
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    Re: Curiosity question-- types of old rye?

    Quote Originally Posted by boss302 View Post
    So, I'm going to pick up a few bottles of rye the next time I visit my friend in Delaware. The two Heaven Hill brands are Pikesville Maryland Rye, and Rittenhouse Menongehela Rye.

    Are they distinct styles? Or is it just to denote the lineage of the original distilleries before they went kaput?
    They used to be distinct styles. Rittenhouse was a Pennsylvania Rye; those ryes had very high rye mashbills, usually didn't have corn in the mash and tended to be characterized by spiciness (though it was really a different character of spiciness than today's ryes). Pikesville was a Maryland rye, which from what I've heard (I've never had a real one) tended to be sweet and fruity.

    These are now both Kentucky ryes, and both certainly have a corn in the mash an probably a traditional Kentucky rye mashbill (just about 51% rye). I've always assumed the two were the same recipe, being made at Brown Forman for HH and now at HH, as I don't know HH to have more than one straight rye mashbill.

  3. #3
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    Re: Curiosity question-- types of old rye?

    So, Bulleit Rye, and a lot of the other LDI stuff, would be closer to a Pennsylvania Rye?
    "Suppose he's got a pointed stick!?!"

    - Eric Idle, Monty Python's Flying Circus

  4. #4
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    Re: Curiosity question-- types of old rye?

    I would imagine LDI and our mashibill would be closest. We are 80 rye 20 malt and during our rye runs, I always do a few fermenters of pure rye, using rye malt.

  5. #5
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    Re: Curiosity question-- types of old rye?

    Both Pikesville and Rittenhouse are reasonably priced, you should get a bottle of each and try them!

    Thomas

  6. #6
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    Re: Curiosity question-- types of old rye?

    Quote Originally Posted by boss302 View Post
    So, Bulleit Rye, and a lot of the other LDI stuff, would be closer to a Pennsylvania Rye?
    Yes, in terms of mashbill. My understanding is that most PA ryes in the ninteenth century were all rye (unmalted and malted). High West has tried to recreate this formula with their OMG rye. Somewhere around the turn of the century, the PA distilleries started using barley instead of malted rye.

    I've had three Pennsylvania ryes ranging from 1917 to 1940. Each one has had a similar flavor note that I describe as sandalwood, spicy but more like wood spice than the cooking spices that I tend to get in today's ryes. It's a very nice and very distinctive note that I've never picked up from any rye on the market today.

 

 

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