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  1. #11
    Bourbonian of the Year 2002 and Guru
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    Re: St George Single Malt

    Did it seem at all scotch-like?

  2. #12
    Connoisseur
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    Dec 2012
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    Re: St George Single Malt

    It's not like any SMS I've ever tasted - batch 12. No peat, wood influence is faint, and it's so fruity/malty that it really has no parallel in the world of whiskey IMHO. A true dessert whiskey, even a lady who drinks Riesling and moscato could enjoy this neat. Ok maybe that's pushing it. In the right context it's very enjoyable but too fruity for a stand alone dram.

  3. #13
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    To me, it's a dessert wine with more punch and a hint of smoke.
    ¡Geaux Tigers! - ¡Visca el Barça!

    "Really though, my hands are sore. The tool was doing it's thing with a flex hose." -Barrel_Proof

  4. #14
    Virtuoso
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    Mar 2011
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    Re: St George Single Malt

    Quote Originally Posted by BFerguson View Post
    Had a free sample of this last night. I know, lucky to say the least.

    Hard to describe, as it doesn't really fit into a "category".

    The pear really comes through on the nose. It's really a delight to nose.

    Viscous in the mouth, coats throughly. Sweet, fruity, light.

    it's good, but it's not in my line of taste. But I was happy to down the sample I was poured.

    B
    Forgot to note the first time, this was a free sample of the XXX. I know, the bartender clearing wasn't thinking on this one.

    But like others chimed in, I didn't find it very scotch like.

    B
    "Life is life and fun is fun, but it's all so quiet when the goldfish die."

  5. #15
    Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    283

    Re: St George Single Malt

    My experience is that when you try to make malt whisky from non traditional stills it's just gonna taste different. By nontraditional I mean stills unlike the copper pot stills usually used in Scotland.

    The new small distilleries popping up, not just in the US but also in the rest of the world, often use multipurpose still setups like Carl and Holstein Stills

    If you come into these malts with a scotch heritage these new malts are bound to judged to be tasting a little bit funny and weird. Often a more floral, eua-de-vie 'ish flavour

    Apart from the different tasting sensation I have also often experienced stuff that wasn't made properly (bad cuts) or simply bottled too young, but this is another side of the story. End of the day these stills seems to make another style of whisky

    If you like it or not is a matter of taste. Most people don't prefer this style to traditional. Drinking Habits. Who knows ?. Personally I have had a lot of malt whiskies from these stills which I found pretty not to my taste. It being whisky from Denmark, France, US, Germany, Canada

    Maybe things will change when we see a considerate amount of older stocks where you have some casks to pick between. Making good whisky is also about statistics, and the more casks you have, the bigger chance of something exceptional good rises

    In Denamrk we have a small amount of new small distilleries, and I found the quality of their spirits is directly dependant of the type of stills they use. The ones I think is by far the best is the ones using traditional stills

    Bear in mind, that I am only speaking about malt whisky here. I have tried very good examples of other styles of whiskies from these "new" stills

    The only good examples of good malt whisky from these kinda stills has been either influenced by either peat or intense wine (sherry to be precise) casks

    The one good example I can think on, from the top of my head is McCarthy's Oregon single malt. It is heavily peated

    Steffen

  6. #16
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    Re: St George Single Malt

    Thanks for that post Steffen, very interesting observations. Among the other brands have you had a chance to try the Millstone Dutch Rye whisky from the Netherlands?

  7. #17
    Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    283

    Re: St George Single Malt

    No I didn't. I heard some good things about it.

    I tried some Millstone many years ago. I can hardly remember it so it couldn't have been too bad. I remember other whiskies from that tasting being worse (It was a WORLD WHISKY tasting in Edinburgh). Waldviertler, an austrian whisky came through as revolting and a french buckwheat whisky (technially not a whisky then) which was tasting different than other whiskies I have tried, but not too different

    With all the endless amount of small craft distilleries out there, some of it is bound to be good, if not now, then at some point

    But I think the type of stills used have a great importance to what kind of malt whisky is produced

    Steffen

 

 

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