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  1. #1
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    Sediment In Old Whiskey

    So tbere was a thread on this sometime back but of course is closed. Certainly therehas been a lot of dusty drinkables out there. The 750ml bottles of Old Fitzgerald have sediment. Its the type of sediment you see in bottled tea, where there are some flakes and some lighter colored clouds along the sides.

    In a different forum i read online suggests that this is the hallmark of a good whiskey that hasnt been overly filtered.

    I have opened it and had a pour. It was delicious.

    Questions:

    1. Is is fats, esters, and solidified oils? It's not cork because it's a twist off plastic cap.
    2. If the code on the bottom is any indication of age, could that much sediment appear after only 12 yrs in the bottle?
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  2. #2
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    Re: Sediment In Old Whiskey

    Wow, 38 views and not one comment. Have I stumpped the crowd or...is it just not as interesting to others?

    I have seen sediment in GTS and WLW, but that's char. There was sediments in my Rare Breed,but those were solidified fats.

    As I said, these are clouds of light colored stains on the bottom. Again, there is no cork to taint it. Could it be that whiskey does in fact change in the bottle after a number of years? Is 10 or..(dare I say it) 12 years the magic number before particles coagulate and separate from the alcohol?

    Am I the only SB'er curious?

    When do deer turn into elk?
    Are stars merely pin holes in the curtain of night?
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  3. #3
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    Re: Sediment In Old Whiskey

    Guilty as a viewer, but have no answer. I haven't found my first "dusty" yet, and the only sediment I've seen is in unfiltered bourbons like GTS. But I keep checking back to see what the answer is

    Now deer turn into Elk when they move to Canada, eh. Their antlers need that fur to keep warm is my understanding.
    Gary
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    "Too much of anything is bad, but too much of good whiskey is barely enough." - Mark Twain
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  4. #4
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    Re: Sediment In Old Whiskey

    Quote Originally Posted by darylld911 View Post
    Guilty as a viewer, but have no answer. I haven't found my first "dusty" yet, and the only sediment I've seen is in unfiltered bourbons like GTS. But I keep checking back to see what the answer is

    Now deer turn into Elk when they move to Canada, eh. Their antlers need that fur to keep warm is my understanding.
    LoL!!!! Yeah, that sounds about right. There "technically" shouldn't be any sediment, especially in an 80 proof bottom shelfer like Old Fitz. Of course there are those who believe in the controversial OBE (Old Bottle Effect) Suggesting that whiskey does in fact continue to age in the bottle as the suspended esters, oils, fats, etc continue to interact withthe glass. Although glass has been described as inert, it is always moving (on a molecular level). It is said that the whiskey does begin to interact with it. But....who knows what difference that'll make.

    Going back the sediment in these litterally Old Fitzes...could it be remotely possible that these weren't chillfiltered? When did chillfiltration become an industry standard? Surely the historians here could chime in *cough* Cowdery *cough*.
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  5. #5

    Re: Sediment In Old Whiskey

    Quote Originally Posted by Bmac View Post
    ...Although glass has been described as inert, it is always moving (on a molecular level). It is said that the whiskey does begin to interact with it. But....who knows what difference that'll make....
    Glass has reactive hydroxy groups on the surface which can catalyze all sorts of reactions such as oxidation, hydrolysis, and polymerization. But that's not such a big factor as whiskey has plenty of water and alcohol that do the same. Also, whiskeys have tannins and other components that can act as acids for doing the same thing. So yea, things can change with time. But how about sittin' around for 17+ years in a barrel?

    Of greater concern to me is what happens to it after it's half empty and still sittin' around. The finer stuff seems to lose a little character to me; some of the fruit seems to go away.

  6. #6
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    Re: Sediment In Old Whiskey

    It is protien that was not filtered out. Probably was not chill filtered. When you cut whiskey down past about 90 proof it will take a protien haze.

  7. #7
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    Re: Sediment In Old Whiskey

    Quote Originally Posted by tmckenzie View Post
    It is protien that was not filtered out. Probably was not chill filtered. When you cut whiskey down past about 90 proof it will take a protien haze.
    Might explain why it tastes good.
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  8. #8
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    Re: Sediment In Old Whiskey

    I've seen this in old bottles. I always assumed it was precipitations of the above mentioned organic compounds.

  9. #9
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    Re: Sediment In Old Whiskey

    Quote Originally Posted by StraightNoChaser View Post
    I've seen this in old bottles. I always assumed it was precipitations of the above mentioned organic compounds.
    Have you tried any of the whiskies? Did you find them good, bad, ugly?
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  10. #10
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    Re: Sediment In Old Whiskey

    Lower proof off the still has a lot to do with it. We have it if we are not careful. I have some IW harper that has it and it is great.

 

 

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